Main content

Alert message

2011-2012 School Year

FALL 2011

September 8-11**

Austin City Limits: Music & Songwriting (grades 8-12) [CANCELLED]

September 11-16

Elementary Access to Academic Skills #1 (grades 3-5) (Access to Academics Program)

September 11-14

Elementary Tech Series Part A: Tech for Tykes (grades 2-3)

September 25-30

Junior Access to Academic Skills #1 (grades 6-8) (Access to Academics Program)

October 2-5

Low Vision Tools & Strategies: Elementary

October 11-14

Elementary Tech Series Part B: Tech for Tykes (grades 2-3)

October 23-28

High School Access to Academic Skills #1 (grades 9-12) (Access to Academics Program)

  • Individualized instruction in areas of Expanded Core CurriculumOR

  • Special Focus: Preparing for College

Oct. 30 - Nov. 4

Accessible Math Tools: Algebra, Geometry, and Beyond (Access to Academics Program)

November 10-13**

Low Vision Tools & Strategies: Secondary

November 13-16

Elementary Tech Series Part C: Tech for Tykes (grades 2-3)

December 1-4**

Junior Independence Weekend: Iron Chef (grades 6-8)

December 8-11**

Elementary School Independence Weekend #1 (ages 6-8)


Spring 2012

January 8-13

High School Access to Academic Skills #2 (grades 9-12) (Access to Academics Program)

January 22-27

Elementary Access to Academic Skills #2 (grades 3-5) (Access to Academics Program)

February 5-10

Junior Access to Academic Skills #2 (grades 6-8) (Access to Academics Program)

February 23-26**

High School Independence Weekend: Camping/Geocaching (grades 9-12)

March 22-25

Looking Good (grades 8-12)

March 29-April 1**

Astronomy (Secondary)

April 19-22**

Elementary School Independence Weekend #2 (ages 9-11)

April 26-29**

In the Driver's Seat: Introduction to Safe Driving with Low Vision

May 3-6**

High School Independence Weekend #2: Prom (grades 10-12)

May10-13**

City Travel for COMS and their Students (Secondary)

** indicates a Weekend program; Students miss only one day of school

(Access to Academics Program) indicates an Access to Academics program

Goals for Access to Academics classes are individualized by request, and could include areas such as technology, tactile graphics, math or science tools, braille literacy, ILS, and other areas from the Expanded Core Curriculum.

Note: For Access classes with a Special Focus, students may work in that area or choose any other area of the Expanded Core Curriculum.

 


FALL 2011 CLASSES

Austin City Limits: Music & Songwriting

September 8 - 11 [CANCELLED]
(grades 8 - 12)

Come face to face with the music. Creating music and songwriting are two well recognized areas of the music scene that appeal to personal expression for teenagers. This program presents a beneficial mode for expressing their creative energies. Students often express a love of music and/or a love for writing but never put the two together as an enriching avocation. In addition, students often express an interest in music as a vocation but are not exposed to the realities of creating music and writing songs as a livelihood.

Students will have the opportunity to:

  • Break down the elements of writing a song and explore each.
  • Participate in songwriting workshops with Austin professional writers and musicians.
  • Explore various music technologies including recording studio gear, Braille music, and software applications.
  • Discuss music and songwriting with local musicians and songwriters in a small group setting.

Critical to the program will be a students' ability to share strategies with their peers on how to best integrate music and songwriting into their daily lives.

[Top of Page]

Elementary Access to Academic Skills #1

September 11 - 16
(grades 3 - 5)

This class allows students to focus on learning a particular area of the Expanded Core Curriculum for visually impaired students (ECC). Math and Assistive Technology are two of the more frequent preferences, although other options are also available. The Special Programs teacher and the student’s teacher of the visually impaired jointly determine objectives for each student. Instruction takes place in a small group setting (typically two to three students with a teacher and TA) and students concentrate on their chosen objectives throughout the week. The objectives identify a common focus (e.g., increasing skills in fraction concepts and calculations, increasing use of JAWS keyboard commands), and students work on skills at their own level. The purpose of the class is to increase each student’s ability to access the academic curriculum (TEKS) by using a specific skill set. In addition to the specific objectives selected, students are introduced to unique tools and strategies used by visually impaired learners, as well as social skills and skills of independent living after school. Please be prepared to discuss possible instructional areas when you refer your student.

[Top of Page]

Elementary Technology Series: Tech for Tykes
(Part A, B, & C)

September 11 - 14, October 11 - 14, and November 13 - 16
(Must be able to attend ALL 3 parts)
(grades 2 - 3)

Two or three students who are tactual learners will come to TSBVI 3 times this fall to learn basic JAWS and Windows keyboard commands. Students will arrive on Sundays and depart on Wednesdays. Between sessions, the Special Programs teacher and the local TVI will jointly work to maintain these skills, sharing ideas and strategies. Click here for printable flyer fully describing the program and its benefits.

Requirements:

  • Students (and their families and schools) must commit to attending all three sessions. Please be certain of this before you apply!

  • This must be viewed as a shared effort in learning to teach the student, including conferencing between the Special Programs and local TVI which could include: watching and creating/sharing videos, phone discussions, developing strategies to support the student. The local TVI must be willing to spend the time required to help his or her student maintain these skills.

  • Students must have JAWS already installed on district computers and have daily access to these computers so that they can practice between sessions.

  • Students must have keyboarding skills (a working knowledge of alphabet and number keys). They should be able to type 10 words per minute and to write and compose a complete sentence.

[Top of Page]

Junior Access to Academic Skills #1

September 25 - 30
(grades 6 - 8)

This class allows students to focus on learning a particular area of the Expanded Core Curriculum for visually impaired students (ECC). Students may attend both of the Junior Access to Academic weeks, furthering the skills they learned in the fall, or working on a new set of skills. Math and Assistive Technology are two of the more frequent preferences, although other options are also available. The Special Programs teacher and the student’s teacher of the visually impaired jointly determine objectives for each student. Instruction takes place in a small group setting (typically two to three students with a teacher and TA) and students concentrate on their chosen objectives throughout the week. The objectives identify a common focus (e.g., increasing skills in algebra concepts and calculations, increasing use of JAWS keyboard commands), and students work on skills at their own level. The purpose of the class is to increase each student’s ability to access the academic curriculum (TEKS) by using a specific skill set. In addition to the specific objectives selected, students are introduced to unique tools and strategies used by visually impaired learners, as well as social skills and skills of independent living after school. Please be prepared to discuss possible instructional areas when you refer your student.

[Top of Page]

Low Vision Tools & Strategies: Elementary

October 2 - 5
(grades and ages vary)

The focus of this class is meeting the unique needs of young students with low vision. Many elementary aged students are learning to explore the range of their visual abilities. This program encourages their interest and prompts students to establish visual independence. These students may be having difficulty accepting their visual impairment or may be curious about increasing their access to visual information through the use of tools and strategies.
During the weekend we discuss issues such as self-esteem, self-acceptance, self-advocacy, problem-solving, social-emotional issues, social participation, understanding and explaining one’s visual condition and needs, optical devices, environmental modifications, reading medium, and access to transportation. Students learn about the importance of feeling and being competent, and how competence expands opportunities in areas such as social interactions and independence.

Students will have the opportunity to learn about:

  • Their eye condition and use of functional vision
  • Skills related to the use of optical devices for near, medial, and distance tasks
  • Importance of developing and maintaining a personal portfolio related to their low vision needs
  • Use of advocacy skills particular to their low vision needs in school and personal settings
  • Developing an extended array of accommodations to increase visual access to a variety of tasks
  • Working with their TVI/COMS to increase documentation and communication of visual skills and explain necessary accommodations to others

Most importantly, they learn from observing and sharing with one another.

They participate in activities such as: a scavenger hunt at a local mall, a chance to interview a low vision specialist, experience in learning centers using typical materials in elementary classrooms with a range of optical devices, and completion of a short video documenting what the student learned. By participating in this program, students will have a stronger sense of managing life independently as a young person with low vision.

[Top of Page]

High School Access to Academic Skills #1

October 23 - 28
(grades 9 - 12)

Students taking this class can work on any aspect of the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC) for visually impaired students, and their teachers can request the objectives needed by their student. Students are placed into small learning groups related to the skills they want to learn. At least one group of the fall High School Access class will be designated for students who wish to learn about the issues and challenges associated with getting ready for college (in past years, this has been a larger group of about 6-8 students). We are highlighting College Prep because we have found that visually impaired students have many needs in this area.

Please be prepared to discuss whether you are requesting College Prep or some other aspect of ECC when you refer your student. Although we are offering College Prep, there will be teachers available to teach other content areas, so please refer your student even if College Prep is not your first choice.

Topics for the college prep subgroup include:

  • Learning about services available to visually impaired students and how to obtain them
  • Communicating with and negotiating the complexities of various bureaucracies such as Texas Division of Blind Services, University Offices for Students with Disabilities, and Financial Aid
  • Choosing an appropriate college and filling out applications
  • Obtaining assistive technology
  • Discussing worries and concerns regarding college, and learning to find help for unanswered questions
  • Maximizing the college social experience
  • Developing and networking with valuable professional and peer contacts
  • Receiving information, helpful tips and anecdotes from other visually impaired students who are successfully participating in the college experience at this time.

[Top of Page]


Accessible Math Tools: Algebra, Geometry, and Beyond

October 30 - November 4
(Secondary students)

This math class is designed for secondary students who will be enrolled for credit in Algebra I or a more advanced SBOE mathematics course during the school year. Students will learn to use a variety of tools in the following areas:

  • Improve skills in using linear measuring devices
  • Improve skills in graphing on a number line and coordinate plane
  • Improve skills in interpreting and constructing tactile graphics
  • Improve skills in interpreting and constructing geometric figures
  • Improve skills in using graphing and non-graphing scientific calculators
  • Improve skills in using a talking scientific calculator

The goal of this program is to provide students with the tools and techniques needed by a visually impaired learner to be successful in a regular math course. Unique adaptations will be provided for the blind and for the low vision learner, including exposure to adaptive graphing calculator solutions. Students will leave the program with new adaptive skills and with knowledge about resources available to assist them in future learning.

[Top of Page]

Low Vision Tools & Strategies: Secondary

November 10 - 13
(grades and ages vary)

This class is designed to meet the unique needs of secondary students with low vision, including 1) challenges of accepting their visual impairment, and 2) learning to access visual information through use of tools and strategies.
During the weekend we discuss issues such as self-esteem, self-acceptance, self-advocacy, problem-solving, social-emotional issues, social participation, understanding and explaining one’s visual condition and needs, optical devices, environmental modifications, reading medium, and access to transportation (including driving and alternative modes of travel). Students learn about the importance of feeling and being competent, and how competence expands opportunities in areas such as social interactions and independence.

Students will have the opportunity to learn about:

  • Their eye condition and use of functional vision
  • Skills related to the use of optical devices for near, medial, and distance tasks
  • Importance of developing and maintaining a personal portfolio related to their low vision needs
  • Use of advocacy skills particular to their low vision needs in school, personal, and business settings
  • Developing an extended array of accommodations to increase visual access to a variety of tasks
  • Working with their TVI/COMS to increase documentation and communication of visual skills and explain necessary accommodations to others

Most importantly, students learn from observing and sharing with one another. They participate in activities such as: a scavenger hunt on a university campus, a visit with a low vision specialist, use of optical devices to complete typical young adult tasks in community settings such as restaurants and the mall, and development of a presentation on information learned throughout the program. By participating in this program, students will have a stronger sense of managing life independently as a young person with low vision.

[Top of Page]

Junior Independence Weekend: Iron Chef

December 1 - 4
(grades 6 - 8)

In this class students will prepare and cook a variety of basic foods within a fun context, as they prepare food over the course of the weekend. They will learn a variety of culinary techniques related to working in the kitchen or with food, such as cutting, pouring, measuring, safety, using a timer, storing items, working in a team, reading recipes, setting a table, shopping, etc.

[Top of Page]

Elementary School Independence Weekend #1

December 8 - 11
(ages 6 - 8)

The Elementary, Junior, and High School Independence Weekends provide the opportunity to develop and practice skills of independent living while focusing on various age-appropriate themes. While participating in enjoyable activities, students will be challenged to practice many skills from the Expanded Core Curriculum for visually impaired students, such as social, communication, technology, self-advocacy, organization, academic, spatial-motor, recreation-leisure, and independent living. Most importantly, the weekend classes provide an opportunity for students to interact, learn and share their unique experiences as individuals with vision impairment with their peers.

[Top of Page]


SPRING 2012 CLASSES

High School Access to Academic Skills #2

January 8 - 13
(grades 9 - 12)

This class is similar to the fall class, except that it does not contain the college prep component. Students will again have the opportunity to work on any aspect of the ECC they select, including technology (which is also taught during the two secondary tech weeks). Many students attend both of the High School Access to Academic weeks. During their second class they can choose to further the skills they learned in the fall, or work on a new set of skills.

[Top of Page]


Elementary Access to Academic Skills #2

January 22 - 27
(grades 3 - 5)

This class allows students to focus on learning a particular area of the Expanded Core Curriculum for visually impaired students (ECC). Math and Assistive Technology are two of the more frequent preferences, although other options are also available. The Special Programs teacher and the student’s teacher of the visually impaired jointly determine objectives for each student. Instruction takes place in a small group setting (typically two to three students with a teacher and TA) and students concentrate on their chosen objectives throughout the week. The objectives identify a common focus (e.g., increasing skills in fraction concepts and calculations, increasing use of JAWS keyboard commands), and students work on skills at their own level. The purpose of the class is to increase each student’s ability to access the academic curriculum (TEKS) by using a specific skill set. In addition to the specific objectives selected, students are introduced to unique tools and strategies used by visually impaired learners, as well as social skills and skills of independent living after school. Please be prepared to discuss possible instructional areas when you refer your student.

[Top of Page]


Junior Access to Academic Skills #2

February 5 - 10
(grades 6 - 8)

This class allows students to focus on learning a particular area of the Expanded Core Curriculum for visually impaired students (ECC). Students may attend both of the Junior Access to Academic weeks, furthering the skills they learned in the fall, or working on a new set of skills. Math and Assistive Technology are two of the more frequent preferences, although other options are also available. The Special Programs teacher and the student’s teacher of the visually impaired jointly determine objectives for each student. Instruction takes place in a small group setting (typically two to three students with a teacher and TA) and students concentrate on their chosen objectives throughout the week. The objectives identify a common focus (e.g., increasing skills in algebra concepts and calculations, increasing use of JAWS keyboard commands), and students work on skills at their own level. The purpose of the class is to increase each student’s ability to access the academic curriculum (TEKS) by using a specific skill set. In addition to the specific objectives selected, students are introduced to unique tools and strategies used by visually impaired learners, as well as social skills and skills of independent living after school. Please be prepared to discuss possible instructional areas when you refer your student.

[Top of Page]

High School Independence Weekend: Camping/Geocaching

February 23 - 26
(grades 9 - 12)

This class is available for High School students who would prefer to participate in a camping weekend rather than the prom weekend. In general, we expect that older high school students (grades 11-12) will prefer the prom, and that the younger high school students will be placed in the camping weekend. Students may attend only one of these two classes.

The camping weekend will provide an overnight outdoor camping experience for younger high school students. This will include activities such as outdoor cooking, setting up and breaking a campsite, a guided nature walk, staff who work in parks, learning about outdoor clothing and equipment needs (e.g., tents, sleeping bags, stakes, camping cookware and food), and teamwork.

[Top of Page]

Looking Good

March 22 - 25
(grades 8 - 12)

The primary objective of this program is assisting teenagers with visual impairments to recognize the many aspects of personal presentation (e.g. physical appearance, positive self-image, clothing style) and to make choices in developing their personal style. These students often miss out on fashion and social education that sighted peers gain through casual observation. Instruction on this topic is necessary to help these students understand the importance of looking good.

Students will have the opportunity to:

  • Recognize what clothing style is most appealing for your body shape
  • Find strategies for staying updated in personal grooming and fashion without breaking your budget
  • Identify appropriate looks and etiquette for informal, professional, and dressy settings
  • Review food choices and the effect they have on overall appearance
  • Discuss socializing and dating concerns when your peer group has typical vision

Activities include meeting with skin and hair care staff at a professional salon, exploring style options with fashion specialists at a major department store, taste testing healthy food choices featured by a nutritionist, and identifying techniques for mastering social situations. Most importantly, the students will share and devise strategies on how to succeed in the teenage social scene.

[Top of Page]

Astronomy: Exploring the Final Frontier!

March 29 - April 1
(Secondary students)

This class lets students explore the exciting field of Astronomy with astronomers from the University of Texas. Students will use their tactile, kinesthetic, auditory and visual senses to explore astronomy concepts such as:

  • Navigating the sky, constellations, and patterns of stars
  • How rockets work
  • The solar system, Earth - Moon system and searching for other solar systems
  • The nature of light
  • Large telescopes, the astronomer’s tool
  • Missions in space, and exploring other worlds

Among other activities, students will create a comet, build and launch their own rockets, make a model of the solar system, and enjoy a nighttime Star Party during which they will explore a University of Texas telescope. This class is a great way to explore concepts that students might have found inaccessible in the past. Plus, it’s fun!

[Top of Page]

Elementary School Independence Weekend #2

April 19 - 22
(ages 9 - 11)

This weekend will have a focus on working in teams, developing critical thinking skills, participating in recreation-leisure activities. Potential activities are: kayaking, ziplining, detective work and riddle solving, nature scavenger hunt.

Past themes have included:
Pioneers Life; Deep Time in Texas (focus on dinosaurs, mammoths), Holiday Heroes, and Capitol Holiday.

[Top of Page]

In the Driver's Seat: Introduction to Safe Driving with Low Vision

April 26 - 29
(grade and age appropriate)

Driving is a teenager’s dream. Finding an answer to the question, “Will I be able to drive?” is a complex picture of gathering facts, making decisions, and facing emotional issues for students with visual impairments and their families. This workshop-style program for students and parents presents a range of information. Can I use a bioptic, a mounted telescopic lens system, to drive? What are the visual qualifications to drive in Texas? What additional skills do I need to be a safe driver? Learning objectives include:

  • Steps to develop pre-driver awareness skills
  • Identification of tools helpful for managing safe travel (e.g., GPS, auxiliary mirrors)
  • Awareness of state-to-state differences in driving qualifications
  • Cost and time commitments related to getting a driver’s license
  • Access to alternate forms of transportation as a nondriver
This program will not provide individual vision evaluations on meeting the criteria to drive. Sessions include information from a low vision specialist and a certified driving instructor as well as perspectives from young adult drivers who are visually impaired. Getting the information you need is the driving force of this program.

[Top of Page]

High School Independence Weekend #2: Prom

May 3 - 6
(grades 10 - 12)

Put your dancing shoes on! It’s time to come join your peers for the event of the year! We’ll have team-building activities on Friday and Saturday and students will be encouraged to make their own corsages for the big night. Expanded Core Curriculum areas covered will include social skills, communication, self-advocacy, recreation-leisure, and independent living, all while participating in exciting activities. Most importantly, the students will be able to interact with their friends, as well as learn about and share their unique experiences as individuals with vision impairment.

[Top of Page]

City Travel for COMS and Their Students

May 10 - 13
(Secondary)

Is your student ready to learn about traveling in a metropolitan area but getting to a large city doesn’t fit into the time allotted for O&M lessons? Here’s your opportunity to teach a variety of the skills needed in a busy metropolitan area:

  • Bus travel
  • Commuter train travel
  • Busy downtown one-way and two-way streets
  • Complex lighted intersections
  • Large indoor and outdoor malls with escalators
  • Large buildings with banks of elevators and revolving doors
  • A large university campus (University of Texas-Austin)
  • Much more!

Come with your student and design the three-day schedule based on your student’s needs. Ruth Ann Marsh, the O&M Consultant for TSBVI Outreach Services, will facilitate your individual program and be available as a resource to you. Only student-O&M pairs will be accepted to this class.

City Travel for COMS and Their Students is a special-focus class for middle and high school students and their O&M Specialists from across Texas. The major goal of this class is to provide a “big city setting” for O&M instruction and practice, with guidance from an O&M Specialist who knows Austin well.

Students and COMS will arrive on campus on Thursday late afternoon or evening, May 10th. Please discuss your travel options with us, and don’t allow transportation issues to keep a student from attending. TSBVI will support the student’s travel expenses to and from Austin. Class will begin on May 10th and end after noon on Sunday, May 13th.

[Top of Page]


There is strong emphases in Texas schools on assuring that students are well prepared and able to master the statewide curriculum (TEKS).  Students with visual impairments may have high academic potential, yet fall behind if their vision limitations prevent them from accessing this curriculum.  There is a rational concern that if a student attends a Short-Term Program, s/he could fall behind in classroom instruction. In our experience, however, the very opposite can occur.  Once students learn the special adaptations needed to access the curriculum, their subsequent learning is much faster and more efficient.  In addition, participating in instruction with other bright visually impaired students and adults can provide a tremendous transformation in a student's personal motivation to succeed in school.  Their attitude can shift from thinking they are only partially able to succeed to giving success their all.  This change in motivation can have an impact on their success in mastering the TEKS as well.

The following table demonstrates how participation in a Short-Term Program can help students improve their performance on the Statewide Curriculum.

How Vision Loss Impacts LearningHow A Short-term Program Can Help

Fact: Vision loss causes deficits in underlying concepts, which affects all aspects of instruction.

80% of learning is acquired through vision. Classroom instruction is designed for sighted students who share a core of visually-acquired concepts. Students with weak underlying concepts lack a base for understanding higher order concepts taught in the general curriculum (TEKS). Subsequent learning is always built upon that weak foundation.

We support academic achievement by providing hands-on, experiential instruction to demonstrate basic concepts that sighted children learn visually. Even secondary students need to fill in these gaps in order to master the curriculum.

  • Reading: much vocabulary is learned visuallye.g., prepositions (under, after), adjectives (few, full), nouns (branch vs. tree, vehicle types), verbs (shrug, crash).
  • Math: e.g., number, portions, spatial & temporal sequence, shapes, measurement

Fact: Students with visual impairments have difficulty accessing the general curriculum (TEKS). They must learn unique access skills not addressed in the general curriculum.

Tailored, intensive instruction in specific tools and techniques is required to master the core academic areas of No Child Left Behind. It can be difficult for local teachers of students with visual impairment to stay current in these rapidly changing technologies, or to provide the level of intensity needed.

We provide a short time away from multiple classroom demands to teach the unique knowledge and skills needed by academic students. We assist students with their school assignments so they don't fall behind.

  • Computer technologies: screen readers /enlargers, electronic notetakers, scanning textbooks electronically, and unique strategies for creating and reading word documents, databases, spreadsheets.
  • Braille for literacy or abacus; Nemeth Code for math and science.
  • Tactile graphs, maps, tables. Tactile tools to measure time, weight, distance, etc.

Fact: Research documents significant social isolation and dependence in visually impaired students taught in inclusive settings. Self-esteem correlates highly with motivation and success in school & adult life.

Learning in the company of peers and adults who experience similar difficulties can be a life-changing experience.

Short Classes at TSBVI allow students to belong to both worlds: they remain a part of their family and community while developing lifelong friends who share their unique experiences.

Students often return home with a renewed commitment to learning and enhanced feelings of self-worth. They are better able to describe and advocate for adaptations they need in order to compensate at school and in life.

Fact: Adults with visual impairments often remain unemployed and dependent upon others, even if they were successful in school.

National data indicate a 30% employment rate for persons who are visually impaired.

Students attending Short Classes meet a range of successfully employed adults who are visually impaired. They listen as these people describe the challenges that they overcame to live independently, successfully, richly, and happily.

If you know a student who may benefit from any of these programs, or if you would like to share or receive additional information, please contact:

Sara Merritt, Principal of Short-Term Programs
Phone: (512) 206-9176
FAX: (512) 206-9168
email: 

What Time Programs End

Most of our classes end at noon on the final day, and students go to the dorm for lunch. They should be picked up at the dorm between 12:30-3:00pm.

Series classes end at 3:00pm on Wednesday. Students may depart earlier depending upon travel arrangements. We ask that students be picked up at the dorm between 3:00 - 6:00pm.

Classes ending on Tuesdays end at 3:00pm. We ask that students be picked up at the dorm between 3:00 - 6:00pm. Depending on available flights, students who are flying home might depart on Wednesday morning.

You will be notified about any other exceptions.

What You Receive After The Class

After a class ends, you will receive:

  • Class Report. A report describing the class objectives and activities, plus a description of how your student performed in the class. The reports for our week-long classes are much more specific and include suggestions for what to do next.

  • Class survey.  Your feedback is essential in helping us plan future classes and complete our report to the Texas legislature.

  • Attendance Report.  This is a letter to the TVI from our principal verifying attendance on the days your student was here. You can give this to your program administration to assure that students are not counted absent from the local district when attending a Short-Term Program class.

Transition Activities to Maintain Skills

To obtain the highest level of retention, skills that are learned in a Short-Term Programs class must be practiced and reinforced when the student returns home. This is true for our Access to Academics and Series classes, which focus on compensatory skills, as well as our weekend classes, which focus on other areas of the Expanded Core Curriculum.

From the time your student is accepted to an Access to Academics class, our teachers will discuss with you various options for maintaining skills to fit your needs and those of your student.

Transition activities may include lesson plans, checklists, videos, and other instructional resources. Some of our classes use the Edmodo platform for sharing these materials, as well as student successes and challenges. Student Edmodo pages create a progress portfolio that may include classroom teachers, family, and the district TVI, as well as TSBVI staff.

[Back to Top]

This class is for students who use ZoomText and/or Windows Accessibility features to access the computer.  Their need to lean in close to the screen and search for the cursor can significantly interfere with their efficient completion of computer tasks, especially as they become older students. Changes to the computer's settings and the use of keyboard commands can help students better access the computer and manage more sophisticated assignments. This group will focus on computer concepts, Windows' accessibility features (select contrast options, increase size of text, change the mouse size, etc.) and Windows-specific keyboard commands. Increasing their pace and efficiency in this area will improve their ability to work alongside their sighted peers.

The class is for students who can work alongside their typically sighted peers, in order to maintain the same pace as their peers.  

Return to general workshop description

 

Coding Attendance for Students Attending a Short-Term Program Class

at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

 

 

Since the 1999-2000 school year, the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI) has provided a service delivery model called Short-Term Programs (STP). This program serves students who attend school in their local district, but come to the TSBVI campus one or more times during the school year for a three-to-five day class designed to address the unique needs of students with visual impairments.

Texas Education Agency officials have determined that, in accordance with 19 TAC 129.21(k)(1), students who attend a short-term program at TSBVI should be counted as “in attendance” in their local school on those days that the student attends short-term program classes. On any school day that the student might travel to and from the TSBVI program but not actually attend classes, the student may not be counted “in attendance”. A provision to this effect is included in the agreement between the student’s district and TSBVI, addressing the student’s attendance in short-term programs (see provision #6. Attendance Accounting). To assist local districts with attendance counting, TSBVI sends a letter to the local school at the end of each class, verifying the dates that their student was attending an STP class.

Signature for Sara Merritt

Sara Merritt
Principal, Short-Term Programs
512-206-9176