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Gaylen Kapperman, Professor Emeritus

Northern Illinois University

Amie Anderson, Graduate assistant
Northern Illinois University

Matthew Flynn, Graduate Assistant
Northern Illinois University

BASIC INFORMATION

The TRX GO is a strength training tool that is designed to be used by anybody, anytime, and anywhere. This guide provides the information you need to get started using the device. Before you begin, please read the following safety guidelines and the instructions on how to properly set up and anchor your TRX GO.

Included in your training kit are the following items:

  1. TRX GO Suspension Trainer straps: Two straps with foot cradles connected by a circular fabric locking loop and a fabric equalizer loop with a carabiner clip above it
  2. TRX Door Anchor: Additional piece consisting of strap and rectangular anchor covered in fabric (hereafter referred to as “pillow”)
  3. TRX Suspension Anchor: Additional strap approximately two feet in length with a carabiner clip on one end and gaps in fabric creating loops along the entire strap
  4. Access to My Locker: Removable card on upper flap of box which contains your unique code and directions to access the TRX My Locker website
  5. Mesh carry bag: Draw string bag that allows you to fold up and take your TRX straps anywhere

SAFETY GUIDELINES

Follow these guidelines to maximize your safety and the life of your TRX. Improper storage or use can cause the TRX to wear prematurely or break, which could lead to injury. The user assumes the risk of injury and all liability resulting from the use of this product. Maximum weight is 350 pounds.

  1. Consult your physician before beginning this or any exercise program.
  2. Inspect your TRX before each use. Do not use a TRX with worn or damaged components. Replace worn or damaged components immediately.
  3. Use a strong, secure anchor point that can support your body weight and securely attach the TRX to it. Weight-test it by pulling hard on the TRX.
  4. Do not attach the TRX to an anchor point with sharp edge. Rubbing against a sharp edge will weaken or cut nylon.
  5. Make sure you are using the correct anchor depending on whether you are using a door or another anchor point
  6. Make sure the floor on which you plan to exercise is not slippery.
  7. Protect the TRX from the elements when not in use. Prolonged exposure to sunlight, damp, and extremes of heat and cold can weaken nylon and metal components.
  8. Do not pull on the handles of the TRX in a pulley-like, sawing motion. This will cause excessive wear on the equalizer loop. If it begins to wear, replace your TRX immediately.

SETTING UP YOUR TRX GO ON A DOOR

  1. Connect TRX Door Anchor to TRX Suspension Trainer Straps via the carabiner.
  2. Place or throw the pillow of the TRX Door Anchor over the door and slide pillow into corner as close to the hinge side as possible for a secure anchor point.
  3. Make sure the rectangle is on the outside of the door as opposed to the same side that you are on and shut door tightly.
  4. Grasp the handles and pull to ensure the door can support your bodyweight.

SETTING UP YOUR TRX GO ON OTHER ANCHOR POINTS

  1. Find an overhead anchor point that is approximately 7-9 feet above the floor that can support your bodyweight, such as a tree, post, or other high, sturdy objects.
  2. Connect the loop at the end of the TRX Suspension Anchor to the TRX Suspension Trainer Straps via the carabiner.
  3. Wrap the TRX Suspension Anchor around the anchor point as many times as necessary until bottom of the suspension anchor hangs about 6 feet above the floor.
  4. Fasten the carabineer of the TRX Suspension Anchor into one of its loops. Pull on anchor to set in place.

ADJUSTING STRAP LENGTH

You will find that different TRX exercises require different strap lengths. The length descriptions are as follows:

  1. Fully lengthened: Straps lengthened as much as possible, approximately 3 inches from the floor
  2. Mid-length: Straps lengthened to tactile halfway mark
  3. Mid-calf length: Straps lengthened so that when hanging straight down, the foot cradles hang at your midcalf when you are standing next to the device, approximately 8 inches from the floor.
  4. Fully shortened: Straps shortened as much as possible

TRX straps can be lengthened and shortened using the following methods. Make sure the TRX straps are not twisted before adjusting.

To shorten:

  1. Hold one strap of the TRX.
  2. Locate the metal buckle on that strap and pull it back with your thumb.
  3. With your other hand, locate the fabric adjustment tab a few inches above the buckle.
  4. Simultaneously press the buckle and push the adjustment tab up along the strap towards the anchor point.
  5. Repeat with other strap.

To lengthen:

  1. Hold one strap of the TRX in each hand.
  2. Simultaneously press down on both buckles with thumbs.
  3. Pull downward, away from the anchor point

RECOMMENDED STRAP LENGTHS

Each exercise provides a recommended strap length, but the general guidelines of strap lengths for certain types of exercises are as follows:

  1. Standing exercises: Mid-length
  2. Row exercises: Fully shortened
  3. Pressing exercises: Fully lengthened
  4. Floor exercises: Mid-calf length

SINGLE HANDLE MODE

Some TRX exercises require the use of one handle. The following instructions explain how to connect the two handles so they can be safely used together.

  1. With one handle in each hand, hold one hand above the other.
  2. Pass the lower handle through the triangle-shaped opening of the higher handle (where the grip is the bottom of the triangle) and switch hands.
  3. Repeat by passing the current lower handle through the triangle-shaped opening of the current higher handle and switch hands.
  4. Pull the now higher handle towards you to lock.

HOW TO PLACE FEET IN FOOT CRADLES FOR floor EXERCISES

Heels in foot cradles for face-up exercises:

  1. Lengthen TRX so that bottom of the foot cradles is about 8 inches from the floor.
  2. Sit facing the TRX and hold each foot cradle between your thumb and index finger.
  3. While still holding the foot cradles, roll on your back with your knees tucked in and simultaneously put both heels into foot cradles.
  4. Press down with heels and extend legs.

Toes in foot cradles for face-down exercises:

  1. Lengthen TRX so that bottom of the foot cradles is about 8 inches from the floor.
  2. Sit facing the TRX and hold each foot cradle between your thumb and index finger.
  3. Place right foot toes-first into left foot cradle.
  4. Cross left foot over right and place toes-first into right foot cradle.
  5. Roll body over to the right into a plank position, allowing feet to rotate inside foot cradles.

PROGRAM INSTRUCTIONS

For each exercise, perform two 30-second sets. (For single-sided exercises, perform 30 seconds on each side.) Rest 30 seconds after each set.

Listed below are individual exercises that can be done in isolation or one after another for a complete workout. For more information about exercises visit TRX workout sequences (www.trxtraining.com).

TRX EXERCISES

TRX Resisted Torso Rotation

Target area: abs, obliques

Strap length: Mid-length

  1. Turn your body so your side is facing the anchor
  2. Grasp one of the handles, leaving the other one hanging
  3. Step away from the anchor until the strap is taut
  4. Hold the handle with two hands at the sternum
  5. Split your stance so your foot closest to the anchor is in front and the other foot is in the rear
  6. Keeping the spine and hips straight, rotate your shoulders and suspend so your top half is facing the anchor
  7. Rotate back up to the starting position
  8. Repeat on other side

TRX Crunch

Target area: abs, obliques, shoulders

Strap length: Fully lengthened

  1. Sit on the floor facing the anchor and put your toes in the opposite foot cradles
  2. Flip over so you are on your hands and knees, keeping your feet in the straps
  3. Lift your knees from the floor so you are in a push-up position
  4. Keep your arms straight and back flat, and bring your knees into your chest
  5. Push back out to the starting position

TRX Side Plank

Target area: obliques

Strap length: Mid-calf length

  1. Sit on the floor facing the anchor
  2. Hold the handles and put your feet all the way through the foot cradles
  3. Turn your body to the right and stack your left foot on top of your right foot
  4. Press the heel of the top foot into the toes of the bottom foot, keeping both feet parallel to the floor and with toes pulled back towards shins
  5. Stack your bottom elbow directly under your shoulder, with hand and forearm on floor
  6. Keeping your midline straight, lift up your hips
  7. Hold for 30 seconds, making sure your ears, shoulders, and hips are in alignment so that your body is not rotated facing the floor
  8. Gently lower your hip down to floor to rest
  9. Repeat on the other side

TRX Pike

Target area: chest, shoulders, arms, abs

Strap length: Mid-calf length

  1. Sit on the floor facing the anchor and put your toes in the opposite foot cradles
  2. Flip over so you are on your hands and knees, keeping your feet in the straps
  3. Lift your knees from the floor so you are in a push-up position
  4. Drive your hips up over your head and shoulders, extending your legs and pulling your toes towards your shins
  5. Return slowly to push-up position

TRX Mountain Climber

Target area: abs, glutes, quads, hamstrings, shoulders, chest, upper back

Strap length: Mid-calf length

  1. Sit on the floor facing the anchor and put your toes in the opposite foot cradles
  2. Flip over so you are on your hands and knees, keeping your feet in the straps
  3. Lift your knees from the floor so you are in a push-up position
  4. Keeping your shoulders over wrist and with a flat back, bring one knee to the center of the chest while keeping the other leg straight
  5. Alternate back and forth

TRX Leg Lowering

Target area: lower abs

Strap length: Mid-calf length

  1. Sit down on the floor with your back to the anchor
  2. Hold the handles in your hands and move forward until the straps are taut
  3. Lie with your back on the floor
  4. Hold your knees up at 90 degrees with your head and shoulders raised
  5. Leading with your heel and pressing down on the handles, push one leg out into a straight line then bring back to 90 degrees
  6. Repeat on other side

TRX Hip Press

Target: hamstrings, glutes, back extensors

Strap length: Mid-calf length

  1. Lie on your back with your feet facing the anchor
  2. Put your heels in the foot cradles (May also use toes if it is more comfortable)
  3. Make sure you have a 90-degree bend at the hip and knee
  4. Keeping feet flexed, push into foot cradles and drive hips into air, creating a straight line from the knees to hips to shoulders
  5. Return to starting position

TRX Squat

Target: abs, quads, glutes, hamstrings

Strap length: Mid-length

  1. Facing the anchor point, grasp the handles and move back until you feel tension
  2. Stand with your feet hip-width apart with your elbows under your shoulders touching your sides
  3. Move hips back and down until your knees and hips make a 90-degree angle, keeping your feet flat on the floor and keeping your forearms and biceps at 90-degree angles
  4. Push back up through your heels to the starting position

TRX Hamstring Curls

Target: thighs, glutes, hips

Strap length: Mid-calf length

  1. Lie on your back facing the anchor point and place your heels in the foot cradles
  2. Stretch your arms outward and position them on the floor
  3. Move your heels toward your body until your knees are positioned over your hips, keeping your hips elevated above the floor and your back flat on the floor
  4. Return your legs to a straight position while maintaining contraction of your abdominal muscles

TRX Suspended Plank

Target: abs, obliques, shoulders

Strap length: Mid-calf length

  1. Sit on the floor facing the anchor and insert your toes into the opposite foot cradles
  2. Turn-over on your hands and knees, keeping your feet in the straps
  3. Lower forearms to the floor and hold this position, keeping your shoulders over your elbows and maintaining a straight back
  4. Return to starting position

TRX Low Row

Target: back, abs, shoulders, biceps

Strap length: Fully shortened

  1. Face the anchor point and grasp the handles
  2. Lean back until your body weight is supported by your heels and your arms are extended straight in front of you
  3. Bend your elbows and pull your body up until your torso meets your hands, keeping your shoulder blades squeezed together
  4. Return to starting position 

TRX Crunch and Curl

Target: biceps, abs

Strap length: Fully shortened

  1. Grasp handles with an underhand grip
  2. Sit facing the anchor
  3. Lie down with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor and your arms extended upward in front of you
  4. Lift your shoulders and upper back off the floor while simultaneously bending your elbows and curling your hands towards your shoulders 
  5. Return to starting position

TRX Tricep Press

Target: triceps

Strap length: Fully lengthened

  1. Hold handles and face away from the anchor point 
  2. Extend arms in front of shoulders and walk forward until you feel tension on the strap
  3. Once in place, bend elbows, lean forward, and bring thumbs to temples 
  4. Straighten arms to return to starting position

TRX Chest Press 

Target: arms, chest

Strap length: Fully lengthened

  1. Hold handles and face away from the anchor point 
  2. Move your feet backwards towards the anchor point until you are at an angle at which you are comfortable
  3. Lower your body by bending your elbows to 90 degrees 
  4. Press into handles and extend elbows to return to start position 

TRX Step Forward Lunge with T-Fly

Target: chest, upper back, quads, hamstrings, glutes

Strap length: Mid-length

  1. Hold handles and face away from the anchor point
  2. Extend your arms at shoulder level with palms down 
  3. Step forward until you feel tension in the strap
  4. Take a long step forward with one leg and open your arms to a “T” position
  5. Lower front knee to a 90-degree angle
  6. Move back up by pushing through front heel and pressing into the handles, returning to starting position
  7. Repeat on other side

TRX Gliding Plank

Target: shoulders, triceps, glutes, abs

Strap length: Fully lengthened

  1. Kneel facing away from the anchor
  2. Place feet in straps directly under the anchor point, positioning forearms on the floor directly under your shoulders
  3. Lift one knee at a time coming to a plank position, keeping your shoulders and hips parallel to the floor so your back is straight
  4. Inhale and glide forward until your head is just beyond your hands
  5. Return to starting position by exhaling and gliding backward until your head is positioned behind your hands

TRX Overhead Squat

Target: abs, hamstrings, shoulders

Strap length: Mid-length

  1. Stand facing the anchor point 
  2. Grasp the foot cradles with your hands and extend your arms overhead
  3. Lower your hips toward the floor while moving your hands back and keeping your arms extended
  4. Move back up using your heels to starting position

TRX Roll Out

Target: abs, obliques, lats

Strap length: Fully lengthened

  1. Hold the handles and stand facing away from the anchor point with feet shoulder-width apart
  2. Extend arms forward and lean forward
  3. Slowly raise arms overhead, keeping body straight as it moves forward, not bending arms
  4. Return to start position

TRX Power Pull

Target: upper back, abs, shoulders, obliques

Strap length: Mid-length

  1. Grasping one handle, stand facing the suspension trainer and move as far back as you can until you feel tension
  2. Hold the handle next to your chest
  3. Rotate your free arm towards the floor and extend the arm that is holding the handle, keeping hips square to the anchor
  4. Return to starting position by pulling yourself up with the arm that is holding the handle while rotating your free arm back toward the TRX until that hand meets the other
  5. Repeat on other side

TRX Deltoid T-Fly

Target: back, shoulders

Strap length: Mid-length

  1. Face TRX and grasp handles
  2. Step backwards until you feel tension
  3. Place your feet with one slightly in front of the other
  4. Move body forward by pulling arms back to a straight position
  5. Return to start position
  6. Repeat on other side

References

TRX Go “Get Started” packet (in box)

TRX Go Set-up video (www.trxtraining.com/train/set-up-and-use-for-the-trx-suspension-trainer)

Gaylen Kapperman, Professor

Visual Disabilities Program
Northern Illinois University

Phyllis Dratnol
Graduate Research Assistant
Visual Disabilities Program
Northern Illinois University

Caitlin Madden
Graduate Research Assistant
Visual Disabilities Program
Northern Illinois University

Introduction

A kettlebell is a solid object that has an easily grasped handle protruding from its top. Kettlebells are readily available in many different weights. The authors recommend that the potential user of kettlebells should have the opportunity to handle a variety of kettlebells varying in weights before attempting the exercises which they have described below. Their recommendation is made in order that the user of kettlebells can select the proper weights appropriate to the level of fitness of the user.

The authors developed the descriptions of various exercise routines by viewing many commonly available videos in which kettlebell exercise routines are demonstrated by experts. All of the videos are inaccessible to individuals who have little or no vision. As a consequence, to enable potential users of kettlebells with little or no vision, the authors have carefully analyzed the routines. They chose to describe three levels of exercise routines and “cool down” procedures.

 It is recommended that each routine or subroutine be carried out in one-minute increments. As a consequence, the authors recommend the use of a timing device, which will provide auditory feedback signifying one-minute increments without the exerciser having to release the grasp of the kettlebell to control the timing device.

The authors have provided step-by-step detailed, written descriptions that a person without useable sight can read using appropriate technology. Since no recorded versions of the descriptions could be provided, the authors recommend that the reader memorize the steps involved in each routine in order to be able to complete the exercises in an uninterrupted fashion.

Any questions or comments should be addressed to the lead author, Gaylen Kapperman, using the following information:

E-mail:

Telephone: 815-753-8453

Visual Disabilities Program

Northern Illinois University

DeKalb, IL 60115

Disclaimer: You should understand that when participating in any exercise or exercise program, there is the possibility of physical injury. If you engage in this exercise or exercise program, you agree that you do so at your own risk, are voluntarily participating in these activities, and assume all risk of injury to yourself.

Kettlebell Freestyle: Level Easy

Warm-Up 1: Full Body Squat

For the warm-up, begin standing with your feet hips-width apart and your feet pointed straight ahead. Allow your arms to hang loosely at your sides. The palms of your hands should be facing your body with the thumbs facing forward.

  1. Without changing the position of your hands and keeping your arms straight, raise your arms up until they are above your head. Your arms should be parallel with your ears and at a slight angle outward from your shoulders.
  2. Now do a slow, deep squat. As you slowly count to 5, start bending your knees to lower your body, making sure the knees do not move over the ankles.
  3. Slowly rise up out of the squat position.
  4. Repeat the full body squat 5 times.

Warm-Up 2: Shoulder Swing

For this warm-up, begin standing with your feet hips-width apart and pointed straight ahead. The palms of your hands should face your body and your arms should hang loosely at your sides.

  1. Begin the shoulder swing by bringing your arms straight out in front of you with your hands facing each other and pointing forward.
  2. Raise your arms straight up and, without stopping the movement, bring your arms backwards, feeling your muscles in your upper back tightening. At this point your arms should be straight and positioned at an angle slightly behind your head and neck. Finish the movement by bringing your arms down until they stretch forward in front of you with your palms facing each other.
  3. Perform the movement slowly. Complete a total of 5 complete movements.

Exercise 1: One Arm Row

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Assume a slight bend in the knees. The kettlebell should be placed on the floor in front of your right foot and the handle should be parallel with the side of your body. Bend forward at your waist and bring your chest towards the floor in order that your torso is at a 90 degree angle with your legs and your chest is parallel with the floor.

  1. Hold the kettlebell by the handle with your right hand and lift it up to your chest. Your arm should be parallel to the side of your body and your elbow should be pointing up towards the ceiling.
  2. Slowly return the kettlebell back down, but maintain your grasp of the handle.
  3. Steps 1 and 2 represent one repetition. Once you have completed 10 repetitions on your right side, repeat the same movements on your left side.

Exercise 2: Front Squat

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Hold the kettlebell by the handle with both hands at your midline with your arms straight.

  1. Lower your body by bending at your knees but not bending at the waist.
  2. Slowly stand back up, returning to the starting position.
  3. Steps 1 and 2 represent one repetition. You should complete a total of 10 repetitions.

Exercise 3: Upright Row

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Hold the kettlebell by the handle with both hands at your midline with your arms straight.

  1. Hold the kettlebell close to your body and bend your elbows raising the kettlebell up to your chin. At this point, your hands should be below your chin and your elbows should be pointing out to the sides.
  2. Slowly straighten your arms and return the kettlebell to the starting position being held by both hands at your waist.
  3. Steps 1 and 2 represent one repetition. Complete a total of 10 repetitions.

Exercise 4: Outside Foot Pick-Up

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. The kettlebell should be placed on the floor to the side of your right foot. The handle should be parallel with the side of your body.

  1. Lower your body by bending at your knees, making sure your knees do not cross over your ankles.
  2. When your thighs are parallel to the floor, pick up your kettlebell by the handle with your right hand.
  3. Slowly stand up straight continuing to keep your arms straight and keeping the kettlebell close to the right side of your body.
  4. Once you are at your full height, lower your body until the kettlebell almost touches the floor.
  5. Steps 1 through 4 represent one repetition. Once you have completed 5 repetitions on your right side, switch to your left side by placing the kettlebell to the left of your body. Repeat the same movements.

Exercise 5: Biceps Curl

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Maintain a slight bend in your knees. Hold the kettlebell by the handle with your right hand. The palm of your hand should face forward away from your body with your thumb facing to the side.

  1. Raise the kettlebell towards your right shoulder, keeping your elbow close to your body and your wrist straight and then lower back down.
  2. Steps 1 and 2 represent one repetition. Once 10 repetitions are completed on your right side, repeat the same movements on the left side.

Exercise 6: Windmill Dead Lift

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. The kettlebell should be placed behind your right foot.

  1. Keeping your arms straight lift them straight up from your sides until they are at shoulder height, parallel to the floor.
  2. Bend your hips to the right to point your right arm down and your left arm up.
  3. Stretch your right arm down to grasp the kettlebell by the handle.
  4. Maintaining your grasp on the kettlebell, straighten back up to the starting position.
  5. Once again, bend at your hips. This movement will result in your left arm pointing down to the floor and your right arm stretching up toward the ceiling with your right hand continuing to hold the kettlebell.
  6. Move back up to the starting position with both arms extended outward from your shoulders and parallel to the floor.
  7. Steps 1 through 6 represent one repetition. Once you complete 5 repetitions on your right side, you should repeat the same routine on your left side.

Exercise 7: Single Arm Swing

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Grasp the kettlebell by the handle with the right hand. Hold the kettlebell at your midline with your arm straight and positioned parallel to the floor.

  1. To begin the swing, bend your knees, maintaining a straight arm, and bend at your waist in order that the kettlebell moves between your legs.
  2. To create the upward swing, use the natural force of straightening your legs and hips to drive the kettlebell forwards and up.
  3. When the kettlebell reaches shoulder height, let it fall back moving between your legs bending the knees once again.
  4. Steps 1 through 3 represent one repetition. Once 5 repetitions are completed on the right side, repeat the same movements on the left side.

Cool Down 1: Shoulder and Arm Stretch

For this cool down exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Maintain a slight bend in your knees.

  1. Straighten your right arm and lift it in front of you in order that it is perpendicular with your body.
  2. Position the left hand holding the outside of your right arm. You may hold the arm either below or above the elbow, but do not place the hand directly on the elbow.
  3. Using the left hand, pull the right arm in towards the chest. The right hand should touch the left shoulder and the right forearm should touch the chest as close as possible. A stretch in the back of the shoulder should be felt as well as in the upper arm.
  4. Hold this position for 30 seconds and then repeat the movement on the left side.

Cool Down 2: Quad Stretch

For this cool down exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Maintain a slight bend in the knees. Balance on one foot. You may wish to stand near a wall or chair for support if needed.

  1. Standing firmly on the left foot, bend the right leg to bring the right foot towards the right glute.
  2. Reach back with the right hand to hold the top of the right foot and pull it in towards the glute. You should feel a stretch in the top of the thigh.
  3. Hold this stretch for 30 seconds and then repeat on the left side.

 

Kettlebell Freestyle Level Intermediate

To complete this entire workout routine, you should repeat a chosen series of exercises for one minute each. During each minute, you should continue repeating the specific exercise as many times as you can. At the beginning, complete the exercises at a slow, steady pace to ensure proper form is maintained. You may wish to begin with a lighter weight until you are accustomed to the movements. Then, you may wish to increase the weights of the kettlebells. The weight which you choose to use should be light enough in order that you are able to maintain the movements involved in each exercise for the full minute, but heavy enough that you sense that your muscles are being stressed sufficiently during the full minute. As you get stronger, you may wish to increase the pace for a greater challenge and eventually increase the weight as well. Remember, correct form is the most important aspect of the exercises. Thus, do not increase the pace or weight to the extent that your form is compromised.

Between exercises, try to avoid taking breaks. If absolutely necessary, limit breaks between exercises to a maximum of 30 seconds to 1 minute. This workout routine is designed to be done at a fast pace in order that you can achieve the best results in a short period of time.

This workout routine should require about 20 minutes. If you would like a longer workout, repeat Exercises 1 through 8 a second time before you complete the Cool Down phase.

Warm-Up 1: Running in Place

For this warm-up, you should begin standing, with your feet hips-width apart. Your hands should be held up near your chin, with your palms facing inward toward your chin. Make your hands into fists to prepare to begin the exercise.

  1. Start running in place by quickly alternating between lifting your right foot, bending your knee to a 45 degree angle, and alternating by lifting your left foot after lowering your right foot, and continuing bending your knees at a 45 degree angle. Your knees should not reach a 90 degree angle with your hips, but rather should rise half the distance between the floor and your hips.
  2. Additionally, your arms should be included in the movement by punching upward as you alternate lifting your feet.
  3. You should begin at a slow, steady pace, and gradually increase your speed in order that your heart rate increases.
  4. To quicken your run-in-place, maintain a balance on the balls of your feet rather than placing your foot flatly on the floor each time you alternate.
  5. Continue this warm-up exercise for one full minute.

Warm-Up 2: Upper-Body Twist

For this warm-up exercise, you should widen your stance to a little more than hips-width apart and squat down in order that your legs are at a 45 degree angle – maintaining a moderate squat rather than a deep squat – with your feet parallel to each other and pointing forward. The goal is to squat to a depth that you can maintain for a full minute.

Lift your elbows and bend them in order that they are at the level of your chest and move your hands to your midline.

Engage your abdominals by squeezing your stomach muscles.

  1. Twist your entire upper body to your right side while maintaining your squat. Do not allow your legs to move. Your lower body should remain facing forward as you twist your upper body as far to the right as is comfortable.
  2. Twist your upper body to the left following the same movement as you twisted to the right. Alternate between twisting to the left and right.
  3. Begin at a moderate pace and increase the pace to the point at which your heart rate increases.
  4. Continue the warm-up exercise for one full minute.

Exercise 1: Sumo Deadlift

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet in order that they are no further apart than hips-width. Hold a kettlebell with both hands, arms hanging down straight and relaxed at your center line. Use both hands to hold the handle of the kettlebell. Your feet should not point directly forward, but instead they should point slightly out away from the center of your body.

  1. Slowly bend your knees into a squat position until the kettlebell touches the floor. Slowly return to the standing position. As you return to that position, be sure to squeeze and engage your glutes. This is one repetition.
  2. Your back should remain straight. Do not lean forward.
  3. Make certain that your knees do not bend forward past your ankles. If your knees cross over the ankles, move your feet slightly farther out until this no longer happens when you assume the squat position.
  4. Repeat the movement at a pace that you can maintain for one minute.

Exercise 2: Kettlebell Floor Press

To begin this exercise, lie on your back on the floor. Your knees should be bent and your feet should be positioned firmly on the floor. Hold the kettlebell by the handle with one hand. Your arm should be bent at a 90 degree angle with your upper arm resting on the floor. The hand holding the kettlebell should point to the ceiling with the kettlebell resting on the back of the hand throughout the exercise. The elbow of the arm should be positioned to the side of the body forming a perpendicular angle rather than pressed against the midsection. Your other arm should lie flat on the floor, you may press your palm into the floor for extra support.

Lift your hips off the floor and squeeze your glutes while keeping your feet firmly on the floor. Maintain this position for the duration of the exercise.

  1. Lift the kettlebell up until reaching the point at which there is a slight bend in the arm. Return the arm back to a 90 degree angle resting on the floor. This is one repetition.
  2. Repeat this repetition as many times as you can in one minute, then switch your kettlebell to the other hand.
  3. Repeat the movements with the other arm for one minute.

Exercise 3: Biceps Curl, Squat, and Overhead Press Combo

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your feet pointed forward. Bend your knees slightly. Hold the kettlebell by the ball with both hands rather than by the handle. Your palms should be pressed against the sides and your thumbs should be pressed into the base of the handle. Lift your arms in order that your hands are positioned at the midline near your chin with your elbows bent. The handle of the bell should point in toward your body at a perpendicular angle.

  1. Slowly lower the kettlebell down towards your feet until your arms are almost straight and your forearms touch the tops of your thighs. At this point, the handle of the bell should be pointing outward away from your body. Slowly raise the kettlebell back up and reposition the handle to face your body.
  2. While maintaining this position, move into a deep squat. Slowly return to the standing position.
  3. As you stand up, raise the kettlebell above your head to the point that your arms are nearly straight. Slowly return your arms to the starting position.
  4. Steps 1 through 3 represent one repetition. Complete as many repetitions as you can for one minute.

Exercise 4: Glute Bridge and Crunch Combo

 To begin this exercise, lie flat on your back, with your knees bent and feet firmly on the floor. For best results, your feet should be positioned close enough to your glutes in order for you to be able to touch your ankles with your hands without sitting up. Hold your kettlebell by the ball with both hands and begin with it resting on your lower stomach or pelvis area whichever is most comfortable for you.

  1. Slowly raise your hips and squeeze your glutes. Make sure to keep your feet flat on the floor. Your head should also continue to rest on the floor.
  2. Slowly lower your hips back down to the starting position. Move the kettlebell to your chin area and allow it to rest on your chest.
  3. Complete a crunch in this position by lifting your head and shoulders up while maintaining contact with the floor with the rest of your body. The goal is to engage your abdominal muscles by tightening your stomach and using those muscles to lift your head and shoulders. To aid with the engagement of your abdominal muscles, tighten them and press down towards the floor causing your back to be flat on the floor. Maintain this position throughout the duration of the crunch. If you feel any tension or pain in your neck, switch to a lower weight for this exercise until you can focus the movement on your abdominal muscles.
  4. Return your arms and the kettlebell to the starting position.
  5. Steps 1 through 4 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one minute.

Exercise 5: High Pull Back from Hang

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart, toes pointing directly forward. Hold one kettlebell by the handle in the right hand allowing the arm to hang straight down next to your right leg. Your knees should be slightly bent.

Move your hips back when you bend your knees. When completing this movement, move your kettlebell to hang between your knees. The weight of your body should be felt in your heels. Be certain that your knees are not crossing over your ankles.

  1. From the bent over position, swing the kettlebell forward and up in order that it reaches above your right shoulder. While you swing the kettlebell, you should stand up straight at the point that your legs are straightened somewhat but continuing to maintain a slight bend. Make sure to squeeze your glutes as you come to the standing position. When you have reached this position, your elbow should be at the level of your shoulder perpendicular to your body. Imagine that your elbow is pointing at someone standing directly to your right. Also, as the kettlebell reaches the level of your shoulder, it should be hovering over your shoulder next to your ear. In this position, it should be perpendicular to the floor.
  2. Swing your arm and kettlebell back down between your legs.
  3. Steps 1 through 2 represent one repetition. The routine should be completed in a smooth, swift manner. You should not pause between any of the movements. Focus on creating a smooth flow from one movement to the next. Continue this routine completing as many repetitions as you can in one minute.
  4. Once you have maintained the movement for one minute with your kettlebell in your right hand, repeat the same steps for one minute with the kettlebell in the left hand.

Exercise 6: Reverse Lunge and Bicep Curl Combo

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart, toes pointing directly forward. Your weight should be focused on your left leg in order that your right foot is resting lightly on the floor. Hold one kettlebell by the handle in the right hand allowing your arm to hang straight down next to your right leg. Hold the kettlebell in order that your fingers face directly forward and your thumb points to the right. Your arm should be positioned tightly next to the right side of your body. You may rest your left hand on your left hip throughout the exercise.

Move your right foot to the rear far enough that you are able to bend your left leg achieving a 90 degree angle without your knee crossing over your ankle. Your right leg should also be bent at a 90 degree angle with only the ball of your foot and your toes making contact with the floor. Your shin should be parallel to the floor. Maintain your arm position as you lunge back.

  1. While holding the lunge position and keeping your upper arm close to your body, complete a bicep curl by lifting the kettlebell to the point that your fingers are positioned up and in towards your shoulder. Slowly return your arm back down to the starting position.
  2. Use your left leg to move back to a standing position and return your right leg to the starting position. Avoid lifting your right foot off the floor as much as possible because you should concentrate on using the muscles of your left leg for this exercise.
  3. Steps 1 through 2 represent one repetition. Continue the routine as many times as you can for one minute.
  4. Once you complete the routine for one minute with your right arm and leg, switch the kettlebell to your left arm and repeat the routine for one minute with your left arm and leg.

Exercise 7: Kettlebell Halo

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart with toes pointing directly forward, with a slight bend in your knees. Your arms should be bent in front of you with your elbows pointing down towards the floor and your two hands holding the kettlebell in front of your chin at the midline position. Hold the kettlebell by the ball with both palms pressed against the sides and your thumbs hooked into the base of the handle. The handle of the kettlebell should be facing up. Your thumbs should be closest to your body while the fingers of both hands face away from your body.

  1. With both hands, slowly lift the kettlebell up and to the right in order that it is positioned next to your right ear and above your right shoulder.
  2. From your right shoulder, bring the kettlebell back and up in order that it is positioned behind and slightly above your head. In this position, your elbows should be pointed directly up towards the ceiling with the back of both upper arms facing directly in front of you and parallel to your ears.
  3. From above your head, bring the kettlebell down and to the left in order that it is positioned next to your left ear and above your left shoulder.
  4. From your left shoulder, bring the kettlebell back down to the starting position at your midline.
  5. Reverse the movement moving the kettlebell in a circle first to your left side and then to your right side and return it to your midline.
  6. Steps 1 through 5 represent one repetition. These movements should be combined to create one smooth, swift movement. Imagine circling the kettlebell around to form a halo around your head. Continue the routine completing as many repetitions as you can in one minute.

Exercise 8: Kettlebell Swing

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet a little wider than hips-width apart with your toes pointing directly forward and with a slight bend in your knees. Hold the kettlebell by the handle with both hands at your midline with your fingers facing forward away from your body. Your arms should be positioned straight down and the kettlebell should be positioned near your pelvis. The handle of the kettlebell should be facing up.

  1. Bend your knees slightly to a 45 degree angle while swinging the kettlebell back between your legs.
  2. Swing the kettlebell forward while straightening your legs. Swing the kettlebell back between your legs and then swing it out in front of you to above your head maintaining straight arms throughout this routine. As the kettlebell moves up, straighten your legs and squeeze your glutes. Pause for one second when the kettlebell reaches the top of the movement.
  3. Swing the kettlebell back down between your legs.
  4. Steps 1 through 3 represent one repetition. Continue the routine completing as many repetitions as you can for one minute.

Cool Down 1: Quad Stretch

For the cool down routine, you should begin by standing with your feet hips-width apart. You may need to use a structure upon which to brace yourself. It can be a wall, table, or a chair. You may wish to practice balancing by not using any structure for bracing. Shift your weight in order that it is focused on your left leg.

  1. Bend your right knee in order that the heel of your right foot is positioned as close to touching your right glute as possible. Perform this action by holding your right foot with your right hand and pulling your right leg up positioning your right foot as close to your glute as possible.

Your right foot, which should be facing behind you away from your body, should be positioned as close as possible to your glute.

  1. Your knee should point directly down at the floor. The inner thighs of both legs should press together at your midline. Your left foot should be firmly on the floor. You should feel a stretch in the front of your right leg.
  2. Hold this position for 30 seconds and then repeat the same routine stretching your left leg.

Cool Down 2: Toe Touch into Scarecrow

For this cool down exercise, begin standing with your feet together touching at your midline with toes pointing directly in front of you.

  1. Stretch your arms straight down towards your feet. Keep your legs straight allowing only a slight bend in the knees. Reach as close to your feet and the floor as you can without bending your knees significantly.
  2. Stand back up stretching your arms up overhead with palms facing forward.
  3. Bring your elbows down in order that they are in line with your shoulders perpendicular to your body in order that your elbows are pointing out to your right and left sides. Your arms should be bent at a 90 degree angle with your fingers pointing straight up and your palms facing forward. Arch your back slightly.
  4. Move from the bent arms position directly back to stretching your arms down to your feet.
  5. Repeat these movements for 30 seconds slowly moving between each movement in order that you feel the stretch in your legs, back, arms, and shoulders.

Cool Down 3: Page Turner

For this cool down exercise, begin lying on the floor on your right side in order that your right shoulder, torso, hip, legs, and feet are in contact with the floor. Bend your knees to a 90 degree angle in order that they are perpendicular to your body. Straighten your arms in front of you in order that your right arm is resting on the floor with palm facing up and your left palm is resting on your right palm.

  1. Lift your left arm in order that it is perpendicular to your body and your fingers are pointing directly up. Move your head in the same direction following this movement in order that your face also is directed up. Only your head and arm should move. The other parts of your body should remain stationary.

Move your left arm reaching back behind your torso towards the floor on the other side of your body. Move your left hand, with the palm facing up, as close to the floor as you can without straining your back. Your head should follow the movement of your arm, so that your face turns towards your left shoulder moving as far back as you can without straining your neck.

  1. Reverse this movement by bringing your left arm back up so that it is perpendicular to your body and then move it back down in order that your left palm touches your right palm.
  2. This routine should be carried out in one smooth, slow movement in order that you can feel the stretch in your back, neck, and arm.
  3. Repeat these movements for 30 seconds on your left side, then switch to your right side and repeat for additional 30 seconds.

Cool Down 4: Child’s Pose into Upward Facing Dog

For this cool down routine, begin by assuming a position on the floor on your hands and knees resting your weight mainly on your legs to reduce the pressure on your wrists. Your palms, knees, and the tops of your feet should be positioned flatly on the floor.

  1. Press your hips back and bend your knees in order that your glutes come as close to resting on your heels as possible. Stretch your arms straight out in front of you and position your forehead on the floor. You should feel the stretch in your arms and back.
  2. Move back up to the “all fours position” and then straighten your legs out behind you. Your arms should be positioned directly below your shoulders with palms pressed on the floor. Your chest should be facing forward. Arch your back if the movement causes no pain. Your face should be directed forward and slightly upwards without straining your neck. You should feel this stretch in your abdominal muscles and your back.
  3. Repeat the movements for a duration of 30 seconds.

 

Kettlebell Freestyle Level Advanced

To complete this entire workout routine, you should repeat each series of exercises for a duration of one minute for each set. Within each minute, you should repeat each routine as many times as you can. At the beginning, complete the exercises at a slow, steady pace to ensure proper form is maintained. You may wish to begin with a lighter weight until you are accustomed to the movements. Then, you may wish to challenge yourself using heavier weights. The weight you use should be light enough in order that you are able to maintain each movement properly for the full minute. The weight should be heavy enough in order that you sense that your muscles are stressed throughout the full minute. As you get stronger, you may increase your pace for a greater challenge and eventually increase your weight as well. Remember, correct form is the most important aspect. Thus, do not challenge yourself to the extent that your form is compromised.

Between routines, avoid taking breaks. If absolutely necessary, limit breaks between routines to a maximum of 30 seconds to 1 minute. The workout routine is designed to be done at a fast pace in order that you can achieve the best results in a short period of time.

In general, this workout routine should require about 20 minutes for completion. If you want a longer workout, repeat Exercises 1 through 10 a second time before you complete the Cool Down stretching segment.

Warm-Up 1: Jumping Jacks

For this warm-up routine, begin standing with your feet a little wider than hips-width apart and your knees slightly bent.

  1. Raise your arms up overhead in order that your palms face forward and your arms are slightly bent.
  2. In one movement, jump to move your feet together while moving your arms down to your sides.
  3. In one movement, jump to move your feet back out to the starting position and your arms back up overhead.
  4. Make the movements repeatedly in a swift manner in order to increase your heart rate.
  5. Continue the warm-up routine for one full minute.

Warm-Up 2: High Punch-Out

For this warm-up routine, begin standing with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Your arms should be bent with your hands in fists in line with your chin. Engage your abdominals by squeezing your stomach, imagine forcing your abdominal muscles back towards your spine.

  1. Move your right fist up and out in order that your arm is extended fully in front of you and your fist is at the level of the top of your head. Return it back to the starting position.
  2. Repeat the same movement with your left arm and then return it back to the starting position.
  3. Alternate the movements quickly in order that you punch forward rapidly. Continue this warm-up for one full minute.

Warm-Up 3 Opposite-Side Toe Touch

For this warm-up routine, begin standing with your feet a little wider than hips-width apart with your toes pointing forward, and your knees slightly bent. Raise your arms up in order they are in line with your shoulders and parallel to one another. Your elbows should have a very slight bend.

  1. Bend at the waist towards your toes. Bring your right arm across your body to touch your left foot.
  2. Stand back up returning to the standing position.
  3. Repeat the same movements moving your left arm across your body to touch your right foot.
  4. Again, return to the standing position.
  5. Alternate between the two movements for one full minute.

Exercise 1: Squat and One-Arm Row Combo

To begin this routine, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Hold one kettlebell by the handle with your right hand and your arm extended down in front of your right leg.

  1. Move your hips back and bend your knees to squat down. As you squat, your arm should stay straight and the kettlebell should touch the floor between your feet. Do not allow your knees to cross over your ankles.
  2. Maintain the squat position as you bend your arm to bring the kettlebell up to your chest. Your elbow should bend and be directed towards the back of your body. Your upper arm should be in line with your torso.
  3. Return the kettlebell back down to touch the floor.
  4. Straighten your legs to resume the standing position. Squeeze your glutes as you stand.
  5. Steps 1 through 4 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.
  6. Once you have done one minute with the kettlebell in your right hand, switch to your left hand and repeat the same routine for one more minute.

Exercise 2: Single-Repetition Swing and Bear Plank Combo

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet wider than hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Hold one kettlebell by the handle at your midline with both hands. Bend over in order that your kettlebell rests on the floor in front of you. It should be placed approximately one foot in front of your feet. Bend your knees considerably.

  1. Maintain the position of your legs as you lift the kettlebell slightly off the floor and swing it back between your knees.
  2. As you swing the kettlebell forward, straighten your legs in order that you come to a standing position. At the end of this movement, you should be standing with your legs straight, arms extended straight out in front of you at the level of your chin. Squeeze your glutes as you come to the standing position.
  3. Bend your knees to swing the kettlebell between your legs returning to the position in step 1.
  4. Swing the kettlebell in order that it comes to rest on the floor and you have returned to the starting position.
  5. Release your grip on the handle of the kettlebell and place your hands on either side of the kettlebell next to it directly below your shoulders touching the floor with your hands.

Jump back to the point that your feet are in line with your hips.

Bend your knees and move back in order that your hips are up and your arms are in front of you with your hands remaining on the floor. Your knees should be suspended above the floor and only your toes and balls of your feet should be touching the floor.

  1. Jump up in order that your feet return to the starting position. Grasp the handle of the kettlebell.
  2. Steps 1 through 6 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.

Exercise 3: Curl and Press Combo

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Grasp the kettlebell by the handle with your right hand, your arm should be positioned straight down at your side. Hold the handle of the kettlebell so that the palm of your hand and your fingernails are facing forward.

  1. Press your upper arm tight to the side of your body as you bend your elbow to bring your hand towards your right shoulder. Your elbow should be bent sufficiently that it is pointing straight down towards the floor at the end of the movement. At this point, the palm of your hand and your fingernails should be facing in towards your shoulder.
  2. Maintain this position of your arm while you twist your wrist and the kettlebell moves in order that the palm of your hand and your fingernails are facing your chin. Continue to twist until the palm of your hand faces forward. At this point, your kettlebell should be resting on the back of your hand.
  3. Press your kettlebell straight up towards the ceiling and straighten your arm. Bring your kettlebell back down to your shoulder and then back down to the starting position.
  4. Steps 1 through 3 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.
  5. Once you have completed the movements for one minute with the kettlebell in your right hand, switch to your left hand and repeat the same routine for one more minute.

 Exercise 4: Single-Repetition Swing and Deadlift Jump Combo

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet wider than hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Hold the kettlebell by the handle at your midline with both hands. Bend over allowing your kettlebell to rest on the floor in front of you. It should be about one foot in front of your feet. Bend your knees considerably.

  1. Maintain the position of your legs as you swing your kettlebell straight back between your knees.
  2. As you swing the kettlebell forward, straighten your legs to come to a standing position. At the end of this movement, you should be standing with your legs straight and arms extended straight out in front of you in line with your chin. You should squeeze your glutes as you come to the standing position.
  3. Bend your knees to swing the kettlebell back between your legs returning to the position in step 1.
  4. The kettlebell should come to rest on the floor as you return to the starting position.
  5. Jump forward placing your feet in line with the kettlebell as you maintain your grip on it keeping the kettlebell on the floor.
  6. Move up to the standing position and jump up in one swift movement. As you jump, hold the kettlebell with both hands at your midline.
  7. Return the kettlebell to the floor and jump back in order to position your feet in the starting location.
  8. Steps 1 through 7 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.

Exercise 5: One-Arm Clean

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Hold the kettlebell with your right hand positioned straight down at your side.

  1. Flex forward at your hips with a slight bend in your knees causing your chest to move slightly towards the floor and the kettlebell moves down between your knees at your midline. The palm of your hand and your fingernails should be facing in towards your body.
  2. Press your upper arm tight to the side of your body as you swiftly bend your arm to bring your hand towards your right shoulder. Your elbow should be bent in order that it is pointing straight down towards the floor. The palm of your hand and your fingernails should now be facing in towards your shoulder.
  3. Return to the position in step 1.
  4. Steps 1 through 3 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.
  5. Once you have done one minute with the kettlebell in your right hand, switch to your left hand and repeat the same routine for one more minute.

Exercise 6: Gorilla Row

To begin this exercise, place the kettlebell on the floor in front of your left foot. Stand with your feet hips-width apart, toes pointed forward.

  1. Flex forward at your hips, bending your knees moving your chest parallel to the floor. Your right arm should reach across your body to grasp the handle of the kettlebell.
  2. Maintain this position as you move the kettlebell across and under your body to the right side of your torso. Your elbow should be pointing up towards the ceiling.
  3. Move your arm back down across your body and tap your kettlebell on the floor in front of your left foot.
  4. Steps 1 through 3 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.
  5. Once you have completed one minute with the kettlebell in your right hand, switch to your left hand and repeat the same routine for one more minute starting with your kettlebell on the floor in front of your right foot.

Exercise 7: Reverse Lunge

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Hold one kettlebell by the handle in your right hand. Your arm should be positioned straight up in line with your shoulder in order that the palm of your hand and your fingernails are facing in towards your midline. The kettlebell should rest on the back of your hand. Hold your arm in this position for the entire minute for the duration of the exercise.

  1. Move your right foot back in order that both of your knees assume a 90 degree bend. Gently tap your right knee on the floor behind you.
  2. Stand back up to the starting position. Be sure not to push up from the floor with your right foot but rather you should use your left leg to push up to the standing position.
  3. Steps 1 through 2 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.
  4. Once you have completed one minute with the kettlebell in your right hand, switch to your left hand and repeat the same routine for one more minute on your left side.

Exercise 8: Uneven Push-Up

To begin this exercise, you should be positioned on the floor in a push-up position with legs straight back, with the balls of your feet and your toes on the floor with arms straight under your shoulders. Your face should be facing down at the floor. Place the kettlebell at the location where your right hand is on the floor. Hold the kettlebell by the handle in this position. Engage your abs by tightening your stomach muscles.

  1. Bend your elbows in order that your chest moves as close to the floor as possible.
  2. Straighten your arms in order that your body moves back up to the starting position.
  3. Steps 1 through 2 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.
  4. Once you have completed one minute with the kettlebell in your right hand, switch to your left hand and repeat the same routine for one more minute.

Exercise 9: Side Lunge and Press Up

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and your toes pointed forward. Hold the kettlebell with your right hand with your arm bent to the extent that your elbow points straight down toward the floor and your hand is in front of your shoulder. The palm of your hand and your fingernails should be facing inward towards your chin. The kettlebell should rest on the back of your hand.

  1. Move your right foot out to the right horizontally to the extent that your right knee assumes a 90-degree bend. Both of your feet should still be facing forward. Your left foot should remain stationary. Push back up to the standing position.
  2. While standing, move your arm straight up in line with your shoulder. Move it back down to the starting position.
  3. Steps 1 through 2 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one full minute.
  4. Once you have done one minute with the kettlebell in your right hand, switch to your left hand and repeat the same routine for one more minute lunging with your left foot towards your left side and moving the kettlebell up in your left hand.

 Exercise 10: Front Squat and Rotational Press Combo

To begin this exercise, stand with your feet slightly wider than hips-width apart. Grasping the handle of the kettlebell. Hold it with your right hand in front of your shoulder. Your elbow should be bent pointing down towards the floor. The palm of your hand and your fingernails should face inward towards your head.  The kettlebell should rest on the back of your hand.

  1. Squat as far down as you can without allowing your knees to cross over your ankles. Push back up to the standing position and squeeze your glutes.
  2. Move your feet with your toes facing to the left as you rotate your body to face the left. Move your arm straight up in line with your shoulder.
  3. Rotate back to face forward as you bring your arm back to the starting position.
  4. Steps 1 through 3 represent one repetition. Repeat this routine as many times as you can for one minute.
  5. Once you have completed one minute with the kettlebell in your right hand, switch to your left hand and repeat the same routine for one more minute, rotating your body towards the right side as you move your left arm up.

Cool-Down 1: Wall Angel

For this cool down exercise, stand with your feet together and your back against a wall. Move your arms to the point that your upper arms are parallel to the floor and your fingers are pointing straight up to the ceiling. Your palms should be facing out in front of you with the back of your hands pressing against the wall.

  1. Slowly slide your arms up the wall as straight as possible.
  2. Slowly slide your arms back down the wall bringing your elbows past the starting position and towards your torso. You should sense the stretch in your back and shoulders.
  3. Repeat these movements for 30 seconds.

Cool-Down 2: Toe Touch

In this cool down exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart and toes pointing forward.

  1. Reach down to bring your fingers as close to touching your toes as possible. Maintain a slight bend in your knees. You should sense this stretch in your hamstrings and shoulders.
  2. Hold this position for 30 seconds.

Cool-Down 3: Butterfly

In this cool down exercise, sit on the floor with the soles of your feet touching at your midline and your knees bent in order that the sides of your legs touch the floor and your knees are pointed out away from your midline.

  1. Grasp your ankles with your hands and pull your feet in towards your pelvis to the extent that you sense a stretch in your inner thighs.
  2. As you pull your feet in, press your elbows into your legs to push them down towards the floor.
  3. Hold this position for 30 seconds.

Cool Down 4: Chest Opener

In this cool down exercise, stand with your feet hips-width apart.

  1. Interlock your fingers behind your back with your arms straight down towards the floor.
  2. Pull your shoulders back while pushing your chest forward and pushing your hands down towards the floor. You should sense this stretch in your chest and arms.
  3. Hold this position for 30 seconds.

We wanted to show how low-tech, low-cost methods can improve lighting and contrast in an environment, to help students with low vision be more comfortable and function more efficiently.

Our sincere thanks to Dorm 575 staff, who graciously agreed to let us “makeover” their space.

Disappearing Door

Doors that are painted the same color as the surrounding wall are hard to locate visually.
Door, trim and wall painted the same color

Appearing Door!

Contrast provided by coordinating color trim brings a door forward.
door trim with contrasting color

Living Room Light

Overall, the room is dim, with little light for those who might want to read.
living room with insufficient lighting

Reading Lights

Lamps, such as these Ott lights that can be individually positioned, allow the individual to manage his or her lighting needs independently.
floor lamps provide additional light for reading

More Reading Light

Barely visible on the right is a smaller lamp on an end table; another approach to adaptable lighting.
Table lamp provides more proximity lighting

A place for small items

Can you find the TV clicker? (Neither can we.)
living room with table, tv stand, and  couch

TV Clicker Found!

A caddy on the central table provides a specific spot for the clicker … now everyone just needs to remember to put it there!
small box with no top, on living room table with TV remote inside

Safety Issues

Curling rug corners … we can fix that!
rug in living room with curled up corner

Safety Issue Solved

The rug was repositioned so that a sofa holds the curling corner flat. (They can also be taped down.)
couch leg sitting on rug corner, removing curl.

Appliance Cabinet

White appliances in a white cabinet aren’t easy to see.
appliance cabinet with white interior and white appliances

Appliance Cabinet …
With Appliances!

With a high-contrast background (just bulletin board paper), they are easy to identify.
appliance cabinet with interior back and sides in red.

Invisible Plastic Containers

Plastic containers in a white cabinet … How many can you count?
cabinet with white interior with clear plastic containers - invisible plastic contatiners

Visible Plastic Containers!

Again … it’s amazing how they appear when contrast is increased.
interior of cabinet has contrasting color (not white) - visible plastic contatiners

Labels on Cabinet Doors

Doors are labeled … but are fonts large enough?
label on the inside of cabinet door (for organization)

Legible Labels

Larger Font is easier to read at a “working distance.”
legible label inside cabinet door - larger font in bold

Oven Door Handle

The oven door handle is in an unusual position. How readily did you find it?
white oven door, white handle on right side of door

Oven Door Handle Found

A strip of high-contrast tape makes the vertical oven door handle easier to see.
oven handle with blue painters tape. makes handle easier to find.

Stove Hood

We’ve all bumped our heads on the white stove hood …
white stove vent hood with white cabinets.

Stove Hood Visible

Maybe we won’t keep doing it, with this high-contrast tape making it stand out.
white vent hood outlined with blue painters tape, so you know where the edge of the hood is.

Student Desk

Glare from sunlight might be a problem at this desk; the student has no control over light where he works.
student desk in dorm room under window at left side of desk

Better Desk

The desk was positioned so that the student’s back will be toward the window … and a variable intensity lamp provided.
desk facing away from window

Toiletries Basket

With white blinds behind it, the basket provided for student use is hard to see.
white basket on dresser with white top, with white venitian blinds as backdrop

Better Basket

A similar plastic basket with an opaque color is much more visible.
basket of colored plastic

Bathroom Containers

White plastic basket and trash can don’t stand out.
white bathroom containers, beige floor, white walls

Better Bathroom Containers

A laundry basket and a trash can in contrast colors are more visible.
bathroom containers (trashcan, clothes basket) made of colored (non-white) plastic.

Small Step-Down to Shower

There’s a tiny ledge just high enough to stub your toe on at the shower entrance.
step-down into shower, same color tile on floor and base of shower

Visible Step-Down

Contrast tape helps make that small obstacle visible ... It might save your toes!
blue tape makes the step-down stand out

Shower Shelf

The shower shelf in the shower could use some highlighting also.
white tiled shower shelf in a white tiled shower

Visible Shower Shelf

Again, contrast tape makes the edge of the shelf visible.
white shelf outlined in blue tape

Towel Shelves

White towels … white shelves … low contrast can be improved.
white towels in cabinet with white interior walls and shelves

Better Towel Shelves

Contrast tape makes the shelves visible … and look what a difference colorful towels make! blue tape on front of shelf, colored towels on bottom shelf

Fire Extinguisher

A white box on a yellow wall lacks contrast … but in an emergency, we would need to find the fire extinguisher in a HURRY.
white fire extinguisher door on beige colored wall

Fire Extinguisher - Visible

Yet again, the blue tape provides excellent contrast, making the white box “stand out” against the yellow wall.
fire extinguisher door outlined in blue tape

Materials List

  • Tape … many varieties; we used colorful duct tape.
  • Bulletin board or Contact paper to line kitchen cabinets.
  • Ott lamps, both table and floor models.
  • APH Variable Intensity Lamp.
  • A little creative thinking.

Thank you!        

TSBVI Low-Vision Aids Study Group

Cindy Bachofer, John Castillo, Blanca Cunningham, Margot Marshall, Dennis Powell, Margaret Edwards, Belinda Rosas, Stephanie Savoie, Pat Stephenson

Versión Español de este artículo (Spanish Version)

By Holly Cooper, Technology Specialist, TSBVI, Outreach

Art is something most children enjoy doing, and it does not necessarily require great vision or motor skills. There are a lot of quick and easy ways to make art activities easier for kids with visual impairments, even those who have other disabilities. When developing ideas for activities, look for things that involve more than just coloring and drawing with pencils or markers. Consider materials that emphasize texture and dimension or teach concepts and skills. Many of the traditional arts activities are appropriate if you keep some things in mind.

Make work easy to access

  • Use trays (cafeteria type, cookie sheets, or APH work/play trays) to keep materials from rolling or sliding away. Trays also can be used to help contain wet materials.
  • Attach paper to the work surface with masking tape. Remember, don't remove them until they are dry or the paper might tear!

Make backgrounds high contrast

  • Make sure that background papers contrast highly with the materials being used.
  • Dark colors such as black or dark blue generally work best for backgrounds, and brighter, more intense colors make better foreground figures. If the work calls for more colorful backgrounds, consider medium blues, purples, and greens. Red, orange, and yellow are backgrounds that contrast well with each other and most other colors.
  • Use a light box, overhead projector, or other suitable light source to help provide contrast. Tape a thin-ply paper such as typing or copy paper to the overhead and use water color markers alone or with stencils. DO NOT use wet materials such as fingerpaints or watercolor paints with overheads or light boxes! This can lead to a nasty shock!!

Consider tactile issues

Finger painting or play dough can be a great activity for many children who are not able to hold paint brushes easily. However, if they are tactilely defensive, you may need to prepare them for touching the medium with their hands.

  • Before these activities, take time to wash or bathe the child's hands in a tub of warm water with a little soap. Massage the fingers gently and encourage the child to rub his hands together. Scrub gently with a brush or washcloth. Wipe them with a towel to dry and rub a little lotion on them.
  • Never put the child's hands into a substance without telling him/her what he/she is going to touch. If language is an issue, take time to let the child explore the substance using other senses such as smell.
  • If possible, warm the substance a little before he touches it. You can put a jar of finger paint directly into a tub of warm water or put playdough-like substances in a ziplock bag, then into warm water. DON'T MICROWAVE, as this tends to produce hotspots that may burn the child! You want to get the substance just close to body temperature. Touch it yourself before offering it to the child.
  • Lead the child's hand to the substance using a hand-under-hand technique. Let him experience you working with the material first before expecting him to move his hands into the paint or dough.

Utilize "themes" to help build concepts

Each season generally has colors, shapes, and objects associated with it. For example, around Valentine's Day there are heart shapes, "X"s and "O"s for hugs and kisses, and the colors of red, pink, and white. A summer theme might teach concepts about water and animals that live in the water, round sand dollars and star-shaped fish, the colors blue, green, yellow and white, gritty sand and fuzzy beach towels, one fish and many fish. By repeating these colors, shapes, textures, and concepts in a variety of art activities during the season, you can help the child learn some specific concepts while they are exercising their creative muscles.

Utilize a variety of materials that emphasize different skills

You can work on developing motor skills by choosing specific materials. If the child needs to practice grasping, try using sponges or a bottle with a sponge applicator. If drawing small circles with a crayon is too difficult a task, she might be able to grasp the extra large chalk and draw bigger circles on the sidewalk. She can work on head control, reaching and grasping while lying on a therapy ball or wedge, using a potato half or corncob to stamp or roll on paint. If your child does not have enough vision to draw shapes with a pencil, can she glue macaroni, cloth, or other materials inside a raised outline made from glue that forms different shapes and patterns? If she can't use her hands to fingerpaint, can she do some painting with her feet? Practice cane skills by walking around and collecting things to make a collage. Build concepts and practice having conversations as you discuss the items you find together.

Art is a great way to keep children entertained, but it is also a great way to teach concepts and skills. As those summer days set in, make some plans to be creative with your child. You both will benefit from the experience. Invite the neighborhood children to join in as well. Creative activities done together can help build fast friendships and provide opportunities to work on important social skills.

SeeHear Spring 2002

Invierno 2000 Tabula de Contenido
English version of this article (Versión Inglesa)

Por: Ron Lucey, Coordinador de Recursos para el Consumidor, Comisión de Ciegos de Texas

Año tras año es un placer ofrecer a los lectores de VER/Oír la información que tengo sobre los campamentos. Espero inspirarlos para que comiencen a buscar su colchoneta de dormir y su mosquitero. El cupo de nuestros campamentos podría estar ya lleno para el tiempo que las flores de primavera comiencen a brotar. En este artículo les doy información sobre tres campamentos residenciales de verano, cada uno de estos campamentos ha sido acreditado por la Asociación Americana de Campamentos. Puede encontrar una lista más completa en el sitio de TSBVI en la Red www.tsbvi.edu.  También, su trabajadora social, consejero de transición o su maestra VI podría darle más información sobre los campamentos locales y regionales.

CAMPAMENTO CAMP (ASOCIACIÓN PARA EL MÁXIMO POTENCIAL DE LOS NIÑOS)

Campamento CAMP es un campamento al que los niños incapacitados y sus hermanitos pueden asistir. Este campamento tiene la reputación de aceptar niños que han sido rechazados por otros campamentos debido a la severidad de su incapacidad. El director de Campamento CAMP, Sam Van Neste, orgullosamente declara: "El número de rechazados es cero". La enfermería con personal completo y la proporción de atención de niño por adulto les permite la habilidad de aceptar a cualquier niño que padece de cualquier incapacidad.

Este campamento está ubicado en Center Point, acepta niños de 3 a 21 años de edad, y entre las actividades que ofrece se encuentran la natación, paseos en canoas, manualidades y paseos a caballo. Con todo lo que este campamento ofrece y el hecho de su participación en ellas su hijo posiblemente adquirirá más confianza en sí mismo. A los padres también les caerá bien una semana de merecido descanso.

Este verano están ofreciendo seis sesiones, y cada una de ellas está dedicada a una incapacidad de desarrollo específica. También tienen sesiones de descanso y sesiones de fines de semana durante todo el año. El costo de cada sesión es $475.00 con escala de disminución de tarifa siendo la tarifa más baja $100.00 Las solicitudes para los campamentos de verano estarán listas después del 1º de enero del 2000. Escriba o llame al:

Campamento CAMP, P. O. Box 27086, San Antonio, TX 78227

Teléfono: (210) 292-3566; Fax (210) 292-3577

Sitio en la Red: http://www.campcamp.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=150&Itemid=122

CAMPAMENTO SUMMIT

El campamento Summit se encuentra ubicado al norte de Dallas-ForthWorth, en Argyle, en 117 hectáreas hermosas repletas de árboles y un campamento residencial libre de obstáculos para las personas con necesidades especiales. La directora del campamento, Lisa Braziel dice: "Nosotros ponemos nuestra atención en las capacidades en lugar de las incapacidades. El personal del campamento pone su atención en alentar el desarrollo de las habilidades que ya tienen los niños y a reforzar lo que las familias están ya haciendo" Este campamento es para niños desde la edad de seis años, los jóvenes y los adultos que padecen de incapacidades físicas, demoras en su desarrollo, incapacidades dobles (sordera y ceguera) y multiincapacitados. Si el campamento puede atender las necesidades médicas del campista, no se hacen excepciones respecto a la extensión de las incapacidades. Este campamento ofrece un consejero por cada dos campistas.

El Campamento Summit ofrece natación, paseos a caballo, estudio de la naturaleza, manualidades, pesca y un curso de cuerda que ayuda a los campistas a adquirir confianza en sí mismos. Todas las actividades son adaptadas a la habilidad del campista en particular. El Campamento Summit pone todo su énfasis en el desarrollo de las habilidades sociales. Las actividades se hacen en grupo. Las fogatas y los bailes ofrecen la oportunidad para que los campistas practiquen sus habilidades sociales al mismo tiempo que se divierten.

Los programas de verano están divididos en diez sesiones de una semana, por edad e incapacidad. También ofrecen un campamento de una semana para los sordociegos de 6 a 50 años. Las solicitudes que llegan primero tienen preferencia. En el otoño tienen sesiones de descanso de fin de semana.

El costo por semana es $500.00 Para los que viven en el área de servicios de Dallas United Way también ofrecen tarifas con escala de disminución. Las solicitudes para el Campamento Summit estarán a su disposición en febrero. Campamento Summit necesita recibir las solicitudes completas diez días antes del día que comienza la sesión. El personal del campamento exhorta a los padres a que llamen si tienen preguntas y a que asistan al día de visita de reconocimiento el primer domingo de mayo.

Campamento Summit, Inc., 2915 Freeway, Suite 185, Dallas, TX 75234

Teléfono: (972) 484-8900 o (972) 620-1945

Email:

Sitio en la red www.campsummittx.org

CAMPAMENTO DEL CLUB DE LEONES DE TEXAS

El Campamento del Club de Leones de Texas se encuentra ubicado en Kerrville y abarcar más de 500 hectáreas en el Valle de Texas. El Campamento del Club de Leones ofrece, gratis, un campamento para los niños con incapacidades físicas, incapacidades del oído y/o la vista, y para los niños diabéticos. El año pasado el Campamento de los Leones cumplió cincuenta años de ofrecer su campamento residencial y sus servicios de descanso a los niños incapacitados en Texas y a sus familias. Este año, el Club de Leones de Texas se ha fijado la meta de patrocinar a 2,000 campistas. El campamento está siendo remodelado para ofrecer mejor acceso a los niños. Entre las remodelaciones que están haciendo se encuentra la alberca olímpica, un comedor más amplio y un área sombreada para picnics, con tres pabellones nuevos.

El Campamento de los Leones es para los niños de 6 a 17 años que padecen de incapacidades físicas, y para los niños de 9 a 16 años que padecen de diabetes Tipo 1. Aún que el campamento cuenta con personal médico, solamente acepta un cierto número de campistas que padecen de problemas médicos o incapacidades específicas. Muchos padres dicen que el principal beneficio que recibió su hijo al asistir al Campamento de los Leones es el aumento de confianza en sí mismos.

"Los niños desarrollan autoestima, hacen amistades y relaciones, adquieren confianza en sí mismos con la atención personal que reciben, practican nuevas actividades y aprenden a tomar riesgos", dice Deb Buehler, directora de desarrollo. Entre las actividades que ofrecen se encuentra la natación, los paseos a caballo, la natación, el estudio de la naturaleza, el tenis, los deportes y hasta salen a acampar fuera una noche.

La fecha límite de inscripción en cualquiera de las sesiones es dos semanas antes del comienzo de la sesión, dependiendo del cupo. Las solicitudes estarán a su disposición el 6 de enero. Descargue su solicitud del sitio en la Red del Club de Leones o escriba o llame al Club de Leones de su localidad. Muchos clubes de Leones también ayudan a las familias con la transportación y ayuda para llevar y traer al niño al campamento.

Campamento del Leons de Tejas, P. O. Box 290247, Kerrville, TX 78029-0247

Teléfono: (830) 896-8500; Fax (830) 896-3666

Email: Sito en la Red: www.lionscamp.com

Winter 2000 Table of Contents
Versión Español de este artículo (Spanish Version)

By Ron Lucey, Consumer Resources Coordinator, Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (formerly known as Texas Commision for the Blind)

Each year I enjoy sharing information about summer camps with SEE/HEAR readers. I hope to inspire you to look now for the sleeping bag and mosquito netting. Even before the bluebonnets blossom, camp sessions may already be filled. Three exceptional residential summer camps, each accredited by the American Camping Association for safety and quality, are featured here. A more complete and updated listing of Texas summer camps is on the TSBVI web site <seehear/winter99/february.htm>. Your local TCB children's caseworker, transition counselor, or VI teacher may also have more information on local and regional camps.

CAMP CAMP (CHILDREN'S ASSOCIATION FOR MAXIMUM POTENTIAL)

Camp CAMP provides integrated camping for children with disabilities and their siblings. It has a reputation for accepting children who may have been rejected by other camps due to the severity of their disability. Camp CAMP's director, Sam Van Neste, proudly boasts, "We have a zero rejection policy." An onsite-staffed infirmary and a one-to-one camper to staff ratio affords it the ability to accept any child with a disability.

Located in Center Point, Camp CAMP serves campers ages 3 - 21 and offers traditional camping activities, including canoeing, swimming, arts and crafts, and horseback riding. With all it has to offer, your child will likely achieve greater self-confidence from the exploration of these new experiences. Parents will also benefit from a week of much needed respite while children are participating.

Six sessions are offered this summer, and each focuses on a specific developmental disability. Respite and weekend sessions are also available throughout the year. All camp sessions cost $475 with a sliding fee as low as $100. Summer camp applications will be available after January 1. The deadline for receiving applications is May 1, 2000. Contact Camp CAMP to request an application and a camp schedule.

Camp CAMP, PO Box 27086, San Antonio, TX 78227
Phone: (210) 292-3566; Fax: (210) 292-3577
Website: <www.serve.com/campcamp>

CAMP SUMMIT

Camp Summit is located north of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex in Argyle on 117 beautifully wooded acres. The camp provides residential barrier-free camping for persons with special needs. Camp Director Lisa Braziel says, "We focus on abilities rather than disabilities. The camp staff encourage the skills that campers already have and reinforce what the family is working on." Camp Summit serves children from the age of 6, youth and adults who are physically challenged, developmentally delayed, dual sensory impaired (deafblind) and multidisabled. No limit is placed on the extent of disabilities as long as the camp can meet medical needs. Two nurses handle medications and a doctor is on-call. The camp ratio is a counselor for every two campers.

Camp Summit offers swimming, horseback riding, wilderness and nature study, arts and crafts, fishing, and a ropes course that will challenge campers and build their self-confidence. All activities are adapted to the individual camper's ability. Camp Summit places an emphasis on social skills. All activities occur as a group. Bonfires and evening dances allow campers to practice their social skills while having fun.

Summer programming is divided into ten one-week age and disability appropriate camp sessions. The camp also offers a one-week deafblind camp for individuals ages 6 - 50. Camp availability is offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Respite services are also available on weekends during the fall.

The cost of Camp Summit is $500 per week. A sliding fee is available to residents who live in the Dallas United Way service area. Applications for Camp Summit will be available in February. Applications must be completed and received by Camp Summit ten days before each camp session. The camp staff encourages parents to contact Camp Summit with questions and attend the open house during the first Sunday in May.

Camp Summit, Inc., 2915 LBJ Freeway, Suite 185, Dallas, TX 75234
Phone: (972) 484-8900 or (972) 620-1945
E-mail:
Website: <www.campsummittx.org>

TEXAS LIONS CAMP

The Texas Lions Camp is located in Kerrville on 500-plus acres in the Hill Country. Texas Lions Camp provides, without charge, a camp for the physically disabled, hearing/vision impaired, and diabetic children. Last year the Lions Camp celebrated its 50th year of providing residential camping and respite services to Texas children with disabilities and their families. This year, the Texas Lions Clubs have set a goal to sponsor 2,000 campers. The camp is undergoing some renovations to improve access such as the addition of an accessible Olympic swimming pool, expanded dining hall, and a shaded picnic area with three new pavilions.

The Lions Camp serves children, ages 6 - 17 with physical disabilities, and children, ages 9 - 16 with type 1 diabetes. Although the Lions Camp has onsite medical staff, they limit the number of campers who have specific medical conditions and disabilities. Many parents feel the main benefit their child received from Lions Camp is an improved sense of confidence. "Children are building self-esteem, and building relationships and friendships, gaining self-confidence with personal care, trying new things and taking risks," says Deb Buehler, Development Director. Activities include swimming, horseback riding, fishing, nature study, tennis, field sports, and even an overnight camp out.

The application deadline for all sessions is two weeks before the beginning of the session, depending on availability. Camp applications will be available January 6. Families may download the applications from the Lions Camp web page or contact local Lions Clubs. Many Lions Clubs also assist families with transportation and support to get a child to and from camp.

Texas Lions Camp, PO Box 290247, Kerrville, TX 78029-0247
Phone: (830) 896-8500; Fax: (830) 896-3666
E-mail:
Website: www.lionscamp.com

Otoño 1999 Tabula de Contenido
English version of this article (Versión Inglesa)

Por: Jean Robinson, Especialista en Apoyo a Familias, TSVI, Servicios VI

Recientemente recibí alguna información de Partners Resource Network con el esbozo de un nuevo proyecto que acaba de recibir subsidio y se llama El Proyecto SURE. La misión de SURE (Búsqueda Ilimitada de Experiencias Recreacionales) es mejorar la calidad de la vida, por medio de actividades de recreación y sociales, de los niños y adultos que padecen de incapacidades. Las metas del proyecto son:

  1. La construcción del Rancho Partners, un centro para retiros y campamentos construido en 26 acres cerca de Evadale, Tx. El campamento será 100% accesible a las personas con incapacidades.
  2. La integración de las personas incapacidades en los programas ya existentes. Esto se hará por medio de la educación y la conscientización de la comunidad.
  3. La creación de actividades de recreo y sociales para niños y adultos con incapacidades.
  4. La adquisición de estabilidad económica por medio del apoyo de la comunidad y colectas de fondos.
  5. La diversión y los juegos.

El Proyecto SURE comenzará a auspiciar eventos y actividades durante el transcurso del año. Una de las áreas principales en las que enfocará sus esfuerzos es la creación de actividades al aire libre (Ej. caminatas al aire libre, juegos de pelota, acampar al aire libre y los picnics). El proyecto solicitará la ayuda de varias organizaciones de servicio, así como de individuos que deseen ayudar como voluntarios. Los eventos y actividades se llevarán a cabo principalmente en los condados de Angelina, Chambers, Hardin, Jasper, Jefferson, Liberty, Montgomery, Ncogdoches, Newton, Orange, Polk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, Tyler y Walker.

Para obtener información al día llame al Proyecto SURE al (409) 898-4684. Este proyecto está financiado con subsidio federal por medio del Departamento de Educación de los Estados Unidos.

Para más información comuníquese a: Partners Resource Network, Inc.- El Proyecto SURE, 1090 Longfellow, Suite B, Beaumont, TX 77706-4819. Teléfono (409) 898-4684 o (800) 866-4726, o visite el sitio en la Red http://www.partnerstx.org

www.puzzlemaker.com ¡Maestras y padres, bienvenidos a Puzzlemaker! En este sitio en la Red usted puede crear rompecabezas y juegos para sus noticieros, volantes, avisos y tareas de clases.

Otoño 1999 Tabula de Contenido
English version of this article (Versión Inglesa)

Publicado con permiso del Brownsville Herald

Una pequeñita con pelo largo hasta sus hombros recogió una estrella de mar, y con ella en el hueco de su mano le tocó la boca en el centro. "Mira, mira esto" exclamó Brittany Madsen al ver que la cosa se movía.

Madsen, con su bastón blanco bajo el brazo, amontonada con otros estudiantes alrededor de una mesa, estaba examinando unas algas marinas, unos erizos de mar y otras criaturas que estaban en unas grandes charolas de plástico claro. En la cabecera de la mesa se encontraba Scarlet Colley enseñando una inmensa jaiba hermita a un grupo de estudiantes.

"Esta es una jaiba hermita roja", ella dijo. "Tiene ojos verdes, verdes"

"¡Maravilloso!" casi sin aliento exclamó otra niña.

Los estudiantes estaban en una gira de estudios marítimos en la que se les permitía tocar lo que estaban estudiando. Este curso fue ofrecido por George y Scarlet Colley, educadores del medio ambiente en la Isla del Padre. Estos niños podrían haber pasado como cualquier otro niño en el campamento, la única diferencia era que estos niños tenían incapacidades de la vista.

Desde hace siete años el Centro de Servicios Educacionales Región I ha ofrecido campamentos para los estudiantes ciegos. Los últimos tres años también los centros de la Región II en Corpus Christi y la Región III en Victoria han participado. "Este campamento fue diseñado tanto para los niños como para sus papás", declaró Peter Graves, quien con Linda Chromaster formuló la primera solicitud de subsidio. Los dos son especialistas en educación y están certificados como instructores de la vista. "Nuestra meta es ayudar a los papás a relajarse" continuó, "también ayuda a los niños incapacitados a desarrollar habilidades de vida independiente".

Graves dijo que espera que en el futuro muchos campistas auspiciados por la Escuela de Ciegos e Incapacitados de la Vista en Austin asistan al campamento. Nuestro campamento podría ser su "primera salida a campamento" cerca de casa. Si nunca han salido de su hogar antes, la salida a un campamento más lejos podría ser mucho más difícil. "Este campamento ayuda a preparar al niño y a sus familias para otras experiencias" Graves dijo.

Este es el segundo año que Jessica Blake, de ocho años, asiste al campamento. Su mamá, Cheryl Blake, dijo que desde principios de enero de lo único que Jessica quiere hablar es de su viaje al campamento. "Ellos aprenden a hacer cosas por sí mismos. Realmente los ayuda a adquirir confianza", dijo ella. La Sra. Blake, enfermera del Valley Baptist Medical Center, se ofreció de voluntaria para ayudar este año en el campamento. "Los niños que sienten nostalgia por su casa pueden llamar gratis en la noche, los papás pueden llamar o visitar el campamento para ver cómo les está yendo a sus hijos", declaró.

El miércoles los niños fueron al Jeremiah Water Park. "El parque tiene caminitos con barandales en ambos lados", la Sra. Graves mencionó, así que "una vez que los niños se sienten con confianza, ellos pueden moverse independientemente (aún que) siempre estamos ahí para cuidarlos".

A partir del lunes, los 32 campistas, de 7 a 18 años de edad han estado yendo a pescar a la Isla de la Princesa, han ido a jugar al parque Jeremiah, han manejado los go-carts y han puesto su orden de comida en en restaurante Blackbeard's"

"La mayoría de los niños nunca habían hecho nada de eso", dijo la Sra. Graves. "Hay niños que nunca habían ido a la playa, que nunca habían ido a un restaurante a comer el buffet o pedido una cena en un restaurant". Un campista que asistió el año pasado jamás había visto una lavadora de platos.

"En el campamento los niños refinan sus habilidades para la vida cotidiana", dijo Christie Waida, una de las maestras de la Región III en Victoria. "Los campistas preparan sus propios desayunos y almuerzos, recogen su ropa y hacen sus camas. Algunos nunca habían preparado un sándwich o tostado pan en la tostadora".

La Srita. Graves les da a los campistas dinero para que compren su cena, y ellos tienen que decidir cuánto dinero pueden gastar en la comida, sumando el refresco y la propina. Los campistas escogen del menú lo que quieren comer, los menús los escribe Graves en braille.

Además de que aprenden responsabilidad, el campamento les ofrece la experiencia de sentirse libres. El miércoles en la noche los campistas, que nunca manejarán un carro, pueden controlar la velocidad y el volante de un go-cart, con una maestra diciéndoles cuando voltear a la izquierda o a la derecha. Hilda Niño, una jovencita de 16 años alumna del Bachillerato Rivera High dijo: "Al principio yo dije: ¡Oh, no! ¿Voy a manejar? pero después dije: ¡Esto es realmente divertido!"

"A mí no me gusta salir de noche" comentó Yesenia Burgos, también de 16 años y alumna de la Escuela Lopez. (Burgos padece de vista limitada en la noche) "¡Chocamos un par de veces, pero estuvo muy divertido!" Burgos dijo que el campamento le ofrece a los estudiantes incapacitados de la vista la oportunidad de conocer a otros jóvenes con incapacidades.

"Ahí no nos tratan como si fuéramos diferentes", Niño indicó. "En la escuela, la gente tiene miedo de platicar contigo y hasta de tocarte. En el campamento eso no sucede". Este es el segundo año que Hilda va al campamento, y el tercer año para Yesenia. Algunos niños regresan cuatro o cinco veces. Muchas maestras y salvavidas también regresan año tras año.

La Srita. Waida comenta que es testigo de "descubrimientos maravillosos" cuando ve a los campistas tocar por primera vez a un pescadito, o sostener en sus manos a una jaibita y sentir lo suaves que son sus tenazas.... sentir la espuma de las olas.

El Sr. Fabian Lara ha sido un salvavidas de campamento los últimos tres años. Al terminar su primer año decidió cambiar sus cursos universitarios para estudiar especializarse en incapacidades de la vista y del oído. "Algunos de estos niños jamás han estado cerca del agua", comentó. "Nada más por ver sus expresiones cuando se meten al agua por primera vez hace que regrese cada año", añadió.

Fall 1999 Table of Contents
Versión Español de este artículo (Spanish Version)

By Jean Robinson, Family Support Specialist, TSBVI, VI Outreach

I recently received some information from Partners Resource Network outlining a new project that has just been funded and is called The SURE Project. The mission of the SURE (Seeking Unlimited Recreational Experiences) Project is to improve the quality of life for children and adults with disabilities through recreation and social activities. The project's goals include:

  1. Build Partners Ranch, a 26 acre camp/retreat center near Evadale, TX. The camp will be 100 % accessible to people with disabilities.
  2. Integration of people with disabilities into current programs through community education and awareness.
  3. Create recreation and social activities for children and adults with disabilities.
  4. Become financially stable through community support and fundraising.
  5. Have some fun and games.

The SURE project will be sponsoring events and activities year round. One of the main areas of focus is outdoor activities, e.g., nature hikes, ball games, camp-outs, and picnics. The project will enlist the help of various service organizations as well as individuals who would like to volunteer their time. Events and activities take place primarily in Angelina, Chambers, Hardin, Jasper, Jefferson, Liberty, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Newton, Orange, Polk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, Tyler, and Walker Counties.

Contact SURE Project at (409) 898-4684 for an up-to-date schedule of new activities. This project is funded by a federal grant through the US Department of Education.

For more information contact: Partners Resource Network, Inc. - The SURE Project, 1090 Longfellow, Suite B, Beaumont, TX 77706-4819; phone (409) 898-4684 or (800) 866-4726; or visit their website at <http://www.partnerstx.org>.

Fall 1999 Table of Contents
Versión Español de este artículo (Spanish Version)

By Mel Huff, The Brownsville Herald, Brownsville, Texas
Reprinted with permission by the Brownsville Herald

A young girl with shoulder-length brown hair held a starfish upside down in her cupped hand and touched the mouth at its center. "Look at that!" Brittany Madsen exclaimed as the thing curled a leg.

Madsen, a white cane tucked under her arm, crowded around a table with other students who were examining seaweed, urchins and other creatures in one of several large plastic trays. At the head of the table, Scarlet Colley held a large hermit crab close to a group of students.

"This is a red hermit crab," she said. "He's got green, green eyes!"

"Awesome!" another girl breathed.

The students were taking a hands-on tour of marine life with environmental educators George and Scarlet Colley on South Padre Island. The students could have been any children at camp, but these children are visually impaired.

For seven years now the Region I Education Service Center has held camps for blind students. For the last three years, children from Region II in Corpus Christi and Region III in Victoria have joined them. The camp was designed with parents as well as children in mind, said Peter Graves, who wrote the original grant proposal with Linda Chromaster. Both are Region One education specialists and certified vision instructors. Graves noted that it's hard for lots of parents to let a child with a disability go away and develop independence. "Our goal is to help parents learn to relax," he said. At the same time, children with disabilities can have a hard time developing independent living skills.

Graves said he expects that many campers will go to camps sponsored by the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Austin in the future. Our camp is a "first camp experience" close to home. If they have never been away from home before, the transition is much more difficult. "This helps prepare them and their families," Graves said.

This is the second year Jessica Blake, 8, has been to the camp. Her mother, Cheryl Blake, said going to camp again was all Jessica could talk about since January. "They learn they can do things by themselves. It really builds their confidence," she said. Blake, a nurse at Valley Baptist Medical Center, volunteered to help with her daughter's camp this year. "Homesick youngsters can call home at no charge at night, and parents can call or visit camp to see how their children are doing," Blake said.

The children were at Jeremiah's Water Park on Wednesday. The park has a trail with railings on both sides, Graves noted, so "once kids get the feel of it, they're on their own, (although) we're always there watching."

Since Monday, the 32 campers, ages 7-18 have gone fishing on the Island Princess, played at Jeremiah's, driven at Ben's Go-Karts and ordered dinners at Blackbeard's.

"Most haven't had these kinds of experiences," Graves said. "We have children who have never been to the beach, who have never been to a buffet or ordered a meal in a restaurant." One camper last year had never seen a dishwasher.

Camp refines the children's skills for daily living, said Christie Waida, a teacher from Region III in Victoria. The campers make their breakfasts and lunches, pick up their clothes, and make their beds. "Some have never made their sandwich or put a toaster pop in the toaster," Waida said. Graves gives the campers money to buy their own dinners, and they have to figure out how much they can spend for a meal, adding in their drink and tip. They order from menus Graves types in Braille.

In addition to providing campers the experience of responsibility, camp gives children the experience of freedom. Wednesday evening many campers who will never drive a car controlled the speed and steered go-karts, with a teacher telling them when to turn right or left. "At first I said, `Oh, no! Am I going to drive?'" said Hilda Niño, a 16-year-old student from Rivera High School. "Then I said, `This is really cool!'"

"I don't like to go out at night," remarked Yesenia Burgos, also 16 and a student at Lopez. (Burgos has limited night vision.) "We crashed a couple of times, but it was really fun!" she added. Burgos said the camp offers visually impaired students an opportunity to meet others who are like them.

"They don't treat us differently," Niño said. "At school, they are afraid of talking to you or even touching you. Here they aren't." This is Niño's second year at camp and Burgos' third. Some children have come back for four or five years. Many teachers and lifeguards also come back year after year.

Waida talks about witnessing "the wonder of discovery" when she watches campers touch a fish for the first time or hold a fiddler crab and see how soft its claws are or experience what a wave is. "This is the greatest refresher and learning experience I have all year," she said. "It reminds me why I decided to dedicate my life to teaching."

Fabian Lara has been a lifeguard at the camp for three years. After the first year, he changed his major to education for the hearing and vision impaired. "Some of these kids had never been near the water," he said. "Just to see their expression change" when they get in is what draws him back every year.