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National Agenda Logo

Kathleen M. Huebner, Ph. D.
Pennsylvania College of Optometry

Complete text of presentation below or
Download Powerpoint presentation (262k)

A Quick Review of What is Included in the Expanded Core Curriculum

  • Compensatory Skills (Braille; listening skills; handwriting skills; abacus)
  • O&M
  • Social Skills
  • Independent Living Skills
  • Recreation and Leisure Skills
  • Career Education
  • Assistive Technology
  • Visual Efficiency Skills (NA-1995)

What Itinerant Teachers Report as Most Time Spent on Expanded Core (CO)

  • Braille Reading and Writing (listed on survey)
  • Nemeth Instruction
  • Braille Preparation
  • Independent Living Skills
  • O&M
  • Vision Utilization (not listed on survey)
  • Technology Training
  • Materials Adaptation
  • Large Print Production (Suvak 1999)

What Itinerant Teachers Report as Most Time Spent Teaching NON-Expanded Core (CO)

  • Math
  • Language Arts (Suvak 1999)

Additional Responsibilities and Time Consuming Activities

  • Communication-Teachers-Parents-Administrators
  • Travel
  • Report preparation/paperwork
  • Assessment
  • Reinforce students' other needs--MH
  • Other Expanded Core areas-social skills, career education, recreation/leisure
  • Materials ordering
  • Professional development

Current Concerns of 70 Experienced Teachers (TX)

  • Keeping up with required paperwork
  • Arranging a balanced schedule
  • Keeping up on morale and confidence

Another Suspected but Unreported Time Eater

  • TUTORING !

How to Make the Best of the Time We Have - Strategies to Make Best Use of Limited Time

  • Teach Only Expanded Core
  • Do Not Tutor
  • Examine Your Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Develop Appropriate and Shared Responsibilities-- Other Teachers/ Aides/Parents
  • Increase Team Effectiveness

Teach Only Expanded Core

  • Be convinced
  • Be determined
  • Be resourceful--in other words YOU have to make it happen
  • Be firm

Avoid Tutoring

  • Ask the question-- Does student need help because the visual impairment is impeding learning?
  • If yes--teach
  • If no--defer to other teacher, personnel, peer tutor, parents

Examine Your Strengths and Weaknesses

  • Be honest with yourself--Identify your weaknesses--its between you and yourself--not the world
  • Weaknesses result in lack of confidence, slowness to accomplish tasks, and defensiveness
  • Weaknesses result in inefficiency and ineffectiveness

Change Weaknesses into Strengths

  • Develop strategies and a plan to change weaknesses into strengths
  • Seek out constructive ways to strengthen your skills and professionalism
  • Work independently and seek out support where needed

Weaknesses Changed into Strengths

  • Recognize your improvements
  • Note that tasks now take less time
  • Note that you now have more confidence in your decisions and the quality of your work
  • Note that you no longer procrastinate or resist doing what used to be weaknesses

ADD OTHERS TO YOUR TEAM
Reauthorization of IDEA (1997)

  • Parents as members of the team
  • Participation of regular educator

Develop Appropriate and Shared Responsibilities-- Other Teachers/ Aides/Parents

  • Model--teach in the regular classroom
  • Provide positive reinforcement
  • Observe students in their regular classes.even snippets of time can tell you a lot
  • Provide formal and informal training
  • Teach your students to direct others for meaningful information-self advocate

Appreciate Other's Diversity

  • Culture
  • Education
  • Socio/Economic Status
  • Response to having a child with a disability
  • Confidence
  • Trust
  • Lifestyle
  • Responsibilities

Keep an OPEN MIND and HEART

  • Don't bring old baggage into the relationship
  • Approach each new relationship with parents with a positive approach
  • Find out parents' perspectives, beliefs, strengths, realities of lifestyles
  • Have high--yet realistic--expectations for not only your students but their families as well

Facilitate Parent Participation

  • Keep an OPEN MIND and HEART
  • Consider parents' individuality/diversity
  • See parents as child's mentors/teachers
  • Consider parent's perspective
  • Give information to the parents through various means and modes

Parents as Teachers/Mentors

  • "When my son was born blind, I didn't get enlightened as to how to teach him everything, but he is my fourth child, I know some things about raising children. Respect me but help me."

Parent's Perspective

  • "Teachers are not always hearing what I'm saying. I see my child at home and I know what he can do and can't do. Why don't the teachers believe me when I tell them I see things they don't?"

Give Parent's Information

  • "Don't just tell me to do it, explain how."
  • "Taking classes made me feel better, like I know something."
  • "Parents need resources too!"
  • "You have no idea how good it made me feel when you asked me to help teach the mom of the new VI child at the school."

Increase Team Effectiveness

  • Build & maintain positive relationships
  • Maintain close contact
  • Communicate a sense of teamwork
  • Don't complain
  • Be a good listener
  • Neither intimidate nor be intimidated
  • See others' perspectives
  • Ask questions

Team Goals

  • Group move toward common goal
  • Each member needs a clear purpose
  • Team members directed toward a goal that may not be clear to others

Support Comes From Many

  • Within yourself (UP TO YOU)
  • Family and friends (90%)
  • Students (80%)
  • Special education teachers (61%)
  • Other Vision Teachers (53%)
  • Parents (52%)
  • Administrators (46%)
  • Regular Classroom teachers (40%)
  • Community (26%) (Seitz, 1999)

TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS
AND ENJOY YOUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Hosted by Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

National Agenda Logo

Kathleen M. Huebner, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania College of Optometry

Complete text of presentation below or
Download Powerpoint presentation (209k)

What is the National Agenda ?

  • A set of common goals designed to improve the QUALITY and QUANTITY of educational opportunities for children who are blind or visually impaired including those with multiple disabilities.

Why a National Agenda ?

  • A realization that our children were not all receiving the QUALITY and QUANTITY of education services specific to their needs -- and that
  • Parents, Professionals and Persons with visual impairments TOGETHER have the power to create positive change

A Quick Review of the 8 Goals

  • REFERRAL of appropriate program --30 days
  • Full PARENTAL PARTICIPATION and partnership
  • Universities prepare sufficient specialized PERSONNEL
  • SERVICE DELIVERY-caseloads based on needs of students-on-going professional development
  • Full array of service PLACEMENT OPTIONS
  • ASSESSMENT- with appropriate expertise
  • INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS available in appropriate media and at the same time as sighted peers
  • EXPANDED CORE CURRICULA

Relevant Publications

The National Agenda for the Education of Children and Youths with Visual Impairments, Including Those with Multiple Disabilities. Corn, Hatlen, Huebner, Ryan, & Siller, 1995, AFB Press.

The Report to the Nation, Corn & Huebner, (1998), AFB Press.

A Call to Action: Practical Suggestions for the Achievement of the National Agenda Goals, Stryker, Huebner, Hatlen, 1999. TSBVI

The National Agenda
"little blue book"

  • Brief History of Development
  • The National Goal Statements
  • Importance of Statements
  • Strategies for Achievement
  • National Committees and Endorsements

The Report to the Nation
"bigger blue book"

  • National baseline data on each goal
  • Reports of 28 state-level activities
  • Vehicle for communicating about the status as of 1997
  • Appendices on caseload policies
  • Resource information
  • OSERS Policy Statement

A Call to Action
A Dynamic Document

For each goal the following is presented:

  • Major issues
  • How to determine current status
  • How to develop a plan of action for your state

Locate it on the Call to Action page.

National Agenda: Replications

  • NA in Australia, New Zealand, and England
  • National Agenda on Vision and Aging

Significant National Off-Shoot Activities

NTPT - National Plan for Training Personnel to Serve Children with Blindness and Low Vision, 2000,Council for Exceptional Children.

NASDE Guidelines - Blind and Visually Impaired Students Educational Service Guidelines, Pugh, & Erin, 1999. Perkins School for the Blind.

 

National Plan for Training Personnel to Serve Children with Blindness and Low Vision--NTPT

3 Goals

  • Personnel Preparation and Development
  • Leadership Development
  • Recruitment and Retention

Cross-Goal

  • National Personnel Preparation Coordinating Council

Personnel Preparation/Development

  • Establish a Personnel Preparation Technical Assistance Network (PPTAN)
    • to facilitate and support collaboration
    • facilitate the application of national program standards
    • provide technical assistance to new and existing programs
  • Extend OSEP program support
    • 5 years
    • increase the award size

Leadership Development

  • Establish a Leadership Development Institute
    • Doctorates
  • Establish a Research to Practice Institute
    • design, collect, analyze, and disseminate data affecting personnel needs in blindness and visual impairment
    • validate practices
    • conduct outcome studies
    • collect accurate counts of children and service providers

Recruitment and Retention

  • Establish a Recruitment and Retention Project
  • We all need to recruit

Cross-Goal
National Personnel Preparation Coordinating Council

  • Comprised of representatives of each of other components and other stakeholders
  • Mission is to guide and provide formative evaluation to facilitate implementation and outcomes of the National Plan

NTPT and NA Goals

Addresses Goals

  • 2 Parent Participation
  • 3 Personnel Preparation
  • 4 Caseloads-Recommends 8 :1 Student:Teacher Ratio
  • 5 Full-Array of Service Options
  • 6 Assessment
  • 8 Expanded Core Curriculum

NASDE Guidelines

  • Over 70 stakeholders including parents involved
  • 13 Participating organizations, including professionals, parents and consumers
  • Intention: Present best practices without value judgements of existing programs or personnel

NASDE Guidelines Content

5 Chapters

  • Foundations
  • Supportive Structure and Administration
  • Assessment
  • Program Requirements and Placement Options
  • Personnel

NASDE Guidelines-Chapter Structure

  • Foundations
    • 10 unique needs, policy/legislation, philosophies, array of options, diversity, multiple disabilities
  • Supportive Structure and Administration
    • 8 roles of personnel and supportive LEA/SEA administration
  • Assessment
    • 6 comprehensive, formal, informal, clinical, expanded core
  • Program Requirements and Placement Options
    • 11 families, options, mentors, extracurricular, equal access, technology, multiple disabilities
  • Personnel
    • 12 specialized training, parent-professional relationships, diversity, O&M, expanded core curricula, certifications

NASDE Guidelines and NA Goals

Addresses All Goals

  • 1 Referral
  • 2 Parent Participation
  • 3 Personnel Preparation
  • 4 Caseloads
  • 5 Full-Array of Service Options
  • 6 Assessment
  • 7 Instructional Media
  • 8 Expanded Core Curriculum

Textbook and Instructional Materials Forum

Addressing:

  • Lack of standardization of electronic file formats provided by textbook publishers
  • Inaccessibility of multimedia textbooks
  • Variation in sate textbook regulations
  • Inconsistent interpretation of copyright law
  • High expense of producing specialized materials and lack of fiscal incentives to develop new technologies
  • Shortage of qualified braille transcribers and production resources
  • Communication and collaboration barriers

5 Workgroups

Solutions Forum and NA Goals

Addresses Goals

  • 2 Parent Participation
  • 3 Personnel Preparation
  • 7 Instructional Media
  • 8 Expanded Core Curriculum

NA Reported Challenges

  • Full Inclusion prevailing philosophy
  • Special schools/services threatened
  • Too few qualified staff/emergency credentialing
  • Loss of staff at all levels, state level leadership to direct service
  • Lack of time
  • Lack of outcome research

NA REPORTED

National Agenda Reported

Deterrents

Facilitators

Loss of Personnel

Additional Personnel

Lack of mutual goals

Mutual goal setting

Lack of information

Widespread understanding

Lack of funding

Financial support

Lack of state adopted texts

Statewide textbook adoption

Lack of leadership

Strong leadership

Lack of planning

Strong action planning

NA not on state conference agendas

NA on conference agenda or special conferences

LEA Control

LEA Control

NA Reported Effective Strategies

  • Partnerships
    • Parents, Teachers, Administrators, Legislators
  • Infusion into many activities
  • Development of best practice guidelines
  • Grass roots infusion of philosophies and actions
  • Increase and/varied tools for communication
  • Adoption of new policies
  • Everyone thinking "expanded core curricula"
  • National backing opens doors/gives backbone to efforts

NA Predominant Positive Responses

  • Feeling of working on common goals--across the country, within the state, within an LEA, within a special school
  • Feeling of HOPE for the future
  • Not alone
  • So many working on so many different aspects toward a common good
  • Family involvement growing
  • Encourages holistic view of our students/services

NA NEXT NATIONAL STEPS

  • Recognize need for more effective advocacy and tools
    • Spanish NA booklet (TSBVI)
    • Mentoring program between NGLs and State Coordinators
    • Parent document about NA by parents
    • Teacher document about NA by CEC-DVI
    • Data for State and local administrators-handy and persuasive

What Else Can YOU Do?

  • Commit yourself professionally to the philosophy and let it show in all of your efforts
  • Stay on top of what your state, your colleagues in state and in the nation are doing
  • Familiarize yourself and USE the NA and related materials such as Solutions Forum, NASDE guidelines
  • Be an active advocate and support your colleagues
  • Teach your students and help their parents become strong self-advocates
  • Believe in quality services and let that belief drive your actions
  • Take pride in what you and your students do
  • Recruit others into the field

And Most of All

Believe and have high expectations for your students, their families and yourself!

Hosted by Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

National Agenda Logo

Anne L. Corn

Vanderbilt University
Downloadable PowerPoint presentation at end of article

What is the National Agenda?

  • Parents, professionals, and adults with visual impairments who have a passion for making education services for children with visual impairments and blindness better (numbers unknown)
  • A journey with a destination but without a complete roadmap

Background

  • A satirical presentation
  • An open letter to professionals and parents
  • A topical meeting
  • A steering committee formed
  • Five committees write goals
  • 19 goals are written
  • Likelihood-impact analysis
  • Data from 400 responses analyzed
  • Eight goals are drafted
  • Reviews by professionals, parents, and consumers
  • National Agenda established
  • National Goal Leaders
  • Advisory board
  • Endorsing organizations
  • Publication of data
  • Publication of the National Agenda booklet

Ten Goals of the Agenda

  • Goal 1: Early referral
  • Goal 2: Parent participation
  • Goal 3: Professional personnel
  • Goal 4: Caseloads
  • Goal 5: Array of services
  • Goal 6: Assessment
  • Goal 7: Access to instructional materials
  • Goal 8: Expanded core curriculum
  • Goal 9: Transition *
  • Goal 10: On-going professional staff development *

* New goals added by the National Agenda goal leaders and work teams

Expanded Core Curriculum (Hatlen, 1996)

  • Compensatory
  • Orientation and mobility
  • Social and interpersonal
  • Independent living
  • Career education
  • Recreation/Leisure
  • Technology
  • Visual efficiency
  • Self-determination *

* Newly identified ECC content area

Basic Premises

  • Change is measurable
  • Empowerment of parents, professionals, adult consumers
  • No ownership
  • Parent-professional partnerships
  • Flexibility at state and local levels for goal setting and activities
  • National supports with state and local efforts
  • Local and state efforts drive national directions
  • The National Agenda is not the solution  people are the solution

Structure

  • Steering committee
  • Parent and professional leadership
  • Advisory board
  • National goal leaders (NGLs)
  • State co-coordinators
  • Endorsing organizations and school programs

National Snapshot of Services

  • National goal leaders gather data for their goals
  • Report to the Nation is published
  • States use national data to compare, contrast, set goals

National, State, and Local Strategies

  • A Call to Action
  • National Web Site
  • Assessment compendium
  • Babies Counts
  • NAPVI parent training in IDEA
  • IMAA included in the newly reauthorized IDEIA
  • Caseload analysis tools and position papers
  • NASDSE Educational Guidelines Training
  • RECC
  • Hadley courses
  • Video
  • Pamphlets developed in both English and Spanish
    • Parents
    • Teachers
    • Administrators

States Efforts

  • Publications
  • Web Sites
  • Legislation (VA)

Spin-off Projects (examples)

  • National Plan for Training Personnel to Serve Children with Blindness and Low Vision (goal 3)
  • Education Guidelines from the National Association of State Directors of Special Education
  • American Foundation for the Blind Textbook and Instructional Materials Solutions Forum (goal 7)
  • Research on the Expanded Core Curriculum for Students with Visual Impairments (goal 8)

Uses of the National Agenda

  • Vehicle to garner political support for change
  • State planning
  • Support for parents
  • Organizer for communications, e.g., newsletters to parents (goal 8)
  • Organizer for personnel preparation (goal 8)

Benefits

  • Functions as a change agent at the national level
  • Facilitates parents and professionals forming partnerships
  • Enhances communications among professionals
  • Identifies assessments and a curriculum that all students with visual impairments should receive
  • Helps administrators understand the roles and functions of the TVI, COMS
  • Facilitates cross agency and cross-disciplinary communications
  • Leadership opportunities
  • Commitment of professionals and parents
  • Empowers professionals and parents to make change (when state or government supports are not available)

Challenges

  • Politics within states
  • States and organizations needing technical support
  • Funding
  • Communications and meetings
  • Organizational status
  • Challenges
  • Autonomous efforts (in the name of)
  • Insufficient data to track change
  • Frustrations with how far we still need to go
  • Accepting change that has occurred as accomplishments worthy of celebration

Current Status

  • Five-year re-assessment resulted in continuation of identified national goals and creation of two new goals
  • New efforts to support states that are motivated but in need of mentorship

Affirmation of Beliefs

When

  • There are early referrals that result in quality services,
  • Parents are true collaborative partners,
  • There are sufficient personnel,
  • There are appropriate case loads for professionals based on the assessed needs of students,
  • Assessments are valid and reliable for the population,
  • There is a fluid array of service delivery options based on the intensity and instruction that each student needs at any point in their educational career,
  • Texts and instructional materials are in appropriate media and available at the same time as for sighted peers,
  • The Expanded Core Curriculum for Students with Visual Impairments is taught by highly qualified educational professionals,
  • Transition planning is developed in partnership with student and family, based on their preferences and interests of the student
  • TVIs and COMS receive on-going professional staff development to hone skills and learn new skills&

Then

  • Children and youths with visual impairments, including those with multiple disabilities will receive an appropriate, quality education in their least restrictive learning environment that results in positive adult outcomes.

National Planning

  • Determine levels of satisfaction with current practices
  • Acknowledge needs exist (if any)
  • Volunteer Steering Committee
    • Respected individuals
    • Individuals without personal agendas
  • Strengths and resources
  • Consider barriers
  • Communications
  • A beginning plan
    • Buy-in from individuals and groups
    • Data
    • Review and input from the field
    • Commitment of several agencies to support effort (examples)
      • American Foundation for the Blind
      • National Goal Leader organizations
      • Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
      • American Printing House for the Blind
      • AER
    • Time
    • Flexibility
    • Patience

Conclusion

When education services are not what you want them to be:

  • Believe you can make change
  • Believe others want to join you in making change
  • Believe you will arrive at your destination, even if you dont have the entire road map
  • Believe you can make change
  • Believe others want to join you in making change
  • Believe you will arrive at your destination, even if you dont have the entire road map
Hosted by Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

National Agenda Logo

Anne L. Corn, Ed.D.
Kathleen M. Huebner, Ph.D.

Complete text of presentation below or
Download Powerpoint presentation (65k)

THE REPORT TO THE NATION PROVIDES:

  • NATIONAL BASELINE DATA ON EACH GOAL
  • A REPORT OF STATE-LEVEL ACTIVITIES TO ACHIEVE GOALS
  • A VEHICLE FOR COMMUNICATION ABOUT THE STATUS OF THE FIELD
  • RESOURCE INFORMATION FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN BECOMING INVOLVED IN THE NATIONAL AGENDA EFFORTS

THE REPORT TO THE NATION WAS DEVELOPED:

  • BY AND FOR PARENTS, PROFESSIONALS, AND CONSUMERS
  • AS PART OF THE PROCESS FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS
  • AS A VEHICLE FOR CHANGE

THE REPORT TO THE NATION CAN BE USED TO:

  • INCREASE ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE PROVISION OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
  • EMPHASIZE THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS, INCLUDING THOSE WITH MULTIPLE DISABILITIES
  • COMMUNICATE WITH EDUCATORS, LEGISLATORS, ADMINISTRATORS, AND OTHERS WHO CAN IMPACT SERVICES
  • HIGHLIGHT THE STARTING POINTS FOR EFFORTS TO ACHIEVE THE GOALS ON A NATIONAL LEVEL
  • PROVIDE COMPARISON DATA FOR LOCAL AND STATE EDUCATION SERVICES

GOAL 1 REFERRAL

PARENT SURVEY: 27 States/240 Families

FINDINGS

  • 71% referred by 6 months of age
  • 85% referred by 12 months of age
  • 52% enrolled in EC by 6 months of age
  • 77% enrolled in EC by 12 months of age
  • 94% enrolled in EC by 3 years of age

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • MORE AND BETTER INFORMATION TO ALL MEDICAL PERSONNEL WHO REFER

GOAL 2 PARENT RIGHTS

NATIONAL SURVEY--Degree to which parents felt knowledgeable with their child's education

101 FAMILIES from 18 STATES

FINDINGS

Felt knowledgeable about their child's:

  • 48% ed. needs
  • 58% legal rights
  • 69% abilities
  • 59% available programs/services
  • 50% future potential

RECOMMENDATIONS:

  • Professionals MUST provide: more information to parents, improve communication, & develop procedures to create parent-professional relationships

GOAL 3 PERSONNEL PREPARATION

  • NATIONAL SURVEY- NUMBERS OF PROFESSIONALS BEING TRAINED & NEEDED BY 2000/ Findings disseminated
  • MODEL OF EXCELLENCE DEVELOPED & PRESENTED TO OSERS/POLICY FORUM
  • PROJECT FUNDED TO STUDY POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
  • NATIONAL COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH EFFORTS UNDERWAY
  • APPLICATION OF NATIONAL STANDARDS ENCOURAGED
  • ENCOURAGE COLLABORATIVE PLANNING AMONG SPECIAL ED. AND PERSONNEL PREP FOR ACCURATE COUNTS OF CHILDREN SERVED
  • ESTABLISH SYSTEMS OF CAREER LEADERSHIP e.g.., MENTORS, MASTER TEACHERS, TEACHERS AS RESEARCHERS, ETC.

GOAL 4 CASELOAD SIZE

NATIONAL SURVEY FINDINGS:

  • SIGNIFICANT VARIABILITY
  • 47 STATES RESPONDED
  • 72% REG. STANDARDS/ POLICY FOR SPECIAL ED
  • 57% REG. STANDARDS / POLICY FOR VI

RECOMMENDATION

  • THERE IS SIMPLY NOT ONE BEST MANNER TO DETERMINE CASELOADS FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE BLIND/VI

GOAL 5 FULL ARRAY OF PLACEMENT OPTIONS

NATIONAL SURVEY 1525 MAILED TO PARENTS-- 359 COMPLETED RETURNED, 24.3%

FINDINGS:

  • 72.6% in PUBLIC SCHOOLS;
  • 6.7% SEPARATE DAY SCHOOLS;
  • 19.3%RESIDENTIAL PLACEMENTS
  • 70% ONLY INFORMED ABOUT THE PLACEMENT THE DISTRICT IS RECOMMENDING;
  • 15% ONLY INFORMED OF TWO OPTIONS

RECOMMENDATION

  • PARENTS NEED TO BE BETTER INFORMED ABOUT HOW THEIR CHILD'S EDUCATION WOULD BE AFFECTED IN EACH PLACEMENT OPTION

GOAL 6 ASSESSMENT

NATIONAL SURVEYS

  • Parent & Professional
  • Information on all standardized, formal, informal assessments used

THREE THEMES EMERGED

  • What is assessed
  • What instruments are used
  • What type of assessment training is needed

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • DEVELOP ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES AND INSTRUMENTS
  • EVALUATE INSTRUMENTS BEING USED
  • DEVELOP GUIDELINES FOR ADAPTING INSTRUMENTS AND INTERPRETING RESULTS
  • DEVELOP/PUBLICIZE TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR PROFESSIONALS WHO ADMINISTER & INTERPRET ASSESSMENT RESULTS

GOAL 7 ACCESS TO MATERIALS

NATIONAL SURVEY

  • 150 SENT, 30 RESPONDED (27 STATES)
  • 81% TO 100% OF THE STUDENTS NEED SPECIAL MATERIALS
  • NOT RECEIVING MATERIALS AT SAME TIME

FINDINGS:

  1. $3.5 MILLION SPENT ANNUALLY
  2. TIME SPAN BETWEEN ORDERS AND DELIVERY 4 TO 7 WEEKS

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • ESTABLISH GUIDELINES FOR STAFFING MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTERS
  • CREATE UNIFORM ACCESS STANDARDS FOR TEXT IN ALTERNATIVE FORMATS
  • OFFER ACCOMMODATION FOR ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM
  • ESTABLISH GUIDELINES FOR STANDARDIZATION OF GRAPHICS
  • ENCOURAGE VENDORS TO DEVELOP FULL-PAGE TACTILE GRAPHICS

GOAL 8 CORE CURRICULUM

CORE CURRICULUM (CC) DEVELOPED

  • REVIEWED BY MEMBERS OF NA WORKING GROUPS
  • DISSEMINATED IN RE:view and NA Packets, WWW
  • CC ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY PREPARED & DISSEMINATED BY TSBVI
  • CC Adopted 1996 AER RESOLUTION

SURVEY:

  • 100 TEACHERS/10 STATES CC

FINDING:

  • CHILDREN ARE NOT RECEIVING "CC"

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Complete and disseminate annotated bibliographies on all areas of the CC
  • Adoption of CC by SEAs
  • Personnel preparation programs assure future teachers are prepared to teach CC
  • Assess implementation of CC
Hosted by Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

National Agenda Logo

Wisconsin National Agenda

This survey is the beginning stage of a response to Goal No. 4 of the Wisconsin State Plan which states: ... "teachers of the visually impaired will be able to receive adequate courses and inservices in the area of the visually impaired within our state to prepare them to meet their student needs ..." This survey will direct our efforts in providing beneficial topics to be addressed within our state. Please check all topics which address issues within your service area for which you would like more information or training. The information/training would come to you in the form of courses or inservices. Comments are welcome on this sheet.

Check areas of interest:

  • Everything you need to know about the National Agenda and the WI. State Plan
  • IDEA 97
  • Assessment: (list specific discipline on back)
  • Learning Media Assessments
  • Vocational Education/Guidance
  • Itinerant Woes: (list issues)
  • Low Vis./Functional Vis. Assessments
  • Early Intervention/Pre-School Issues
  • Reading Rates for Visually Impaired
  • Discipline/Behavior Management
  • Optics
  • Orientation and Mobility
  • Daily Living Skills
  • Social Skills
  • Transition
  • Listening Skills
  • Academic vs. Functional track
  • Pre-school children
  • Professional Organizations (WAER)
  • Network for VI teachers in Wisconsin
  • Visual Efficiency Skills
  • IEP writing
  • Inter-staff relationships
  • Burn-Out
  • Teaching kids with multiple disabilities
  • Braille
  • Inclusion issues: (be specific)
  • Evaluation of magnification needs
  • VI curriculum
  • Technology: Assis., Tchr., Pupil
  • Testing/Portfolio
  • P.E./Sports
  • Adapting curriculum
  • Recreation
  • Outreach Services
  • State and National Agencies: VI

Rank order top four interest areas:

1. ________
2. ________
3. ________
4. ________

Comments/Other: (may use back of sheet)

Please hand in at AER conference or mail to:

Mary Tellefson
C/O Cambridge Elem. School
802 W. Water Street
Cambridge, WI 53523

Hosted by Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

National Agenda Logo

Wisconsin National Agenda

What School Can My Child Attend?

Goal No. 5 of the National Agenda for Students with Visual Impairments, Including Those with Multiple Disabilities, states that a full array of placement options will be available for students who are visually impaired.

Wisconsin Placement Options for Students with Visual Impairment

School and Residential Facility. Wisconsin School for the Visually Handicapped (WSVH), a component of the Wisconsin Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired: Students from all over the state of Wisconsin attend school at WSVH, either boarding at the school or attending as day students. WSVH is a 24-hour facility providing comprehensive instruction on a daily basis in academics, communication skills including braille, activities of daily living, Orientation and Mobility, technology, as well as other needed skills. One strength of a residential placement is expanded opportunity for participation in extra-curricular and social activities with other students with visual impairment. Integration in classes within the Janesville Public School system is available for students whose IEP's reflect such a setting. Placement at WSVH can vary from a few weeks to several years, depending on the needs of a particular student.

Contact:
Dr. Tom Hanson, WSVH Superintendent
1700 West State Street
Janesville, WI 53546
1-800-8323-9784
1-608-758-6120

Special Class. A Special Education Program located in a regular school building, which serves children with visual impairment in the majority or all of the instructional areas within the special education classroom. Individual students may be integrated into other regular or special education programs, for short periods of time during the day. As a strength of this program, students receive a high level of direct instruction in one-to-one or small group settings. As a result, students will be better prepared to participate successfully in general education and community environments.

Resource Program. Regional resource programs are designed to serve students with visual impairment from a number of school districts. Students are integrated into general education academic classes. In addition, students receive instruction in specific skills within the resource program as needed. A strength of this program is the opportunity for socialization with both regular education peers and peers with visual impairment. The resource teacher provides direct instruction, student support in all classrooms, and consultation with regular education staff.

Itinerant Programs. A special education program for students with visual impairment in which the teacher serves students in several schools, often in several school districts. The itinerant teacher can provide a range of services including direct instruction and indirect consultation, based on student need. A strength of this program is that students receiving itinerant services attend the majority of general education classes and have the opportunity to participate in regular extra-curricular activities.

Information on Program Options

Samantha Hoffman
The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
Education Consultant--Visual Impairment
125 South Webster
Madison, WI 53702
1-800-441-4563

Private Agencies Serving Students with Visual Impairment in Wisconsin

Holy Assumption Resource Room for the Blind
1526 South 72nd Street
West Allis, WI 53214
Contact: Sister Mel Marie Stoll
414-774-8783

Center for Blind and Visually Impaired Children: Non-profit special education and therapy services for blind or visually impaired children, and their families.
5600 West Brown Deer Road
Milwaukee, WI 53223
Contact: Erica Weise
414-355-3060

Did You Know the Following?

  • According to IDEA 97 (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act--Federal Special Education Legislation), you are an equal participant on your child's Individualized Education Program (IEP) team.
  • There is a nationally recognized curriculum for students with visual impairment (see the National Agenda document). The needs of your child should determine educational placement decisions made by the IEP team.
  • Each school district, Local Education Agency (LEA), must provide a Free, Appropriate, Public Education (FAPE) in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE).
  • School districts, LEA's, must provide a variety of placement options for students with disabilities.
  • Your child can attend his/her local school and also attend the Wisconsin School for the Visually Handicapped (WSVH) during the same school year.
  • At any time, one or more of the following placement options may be beneficial to meet the needs of an individual student.

This document is available in alternative formats upon request. Please feel free to copy this document as needed or for additional copies, please contact:

Wisconsin Council of the Blind
354 West Main Street
Madison, WI 53703
608-255-1166
800-783-5213
(Revision date) 1-28-2000

For Academic Secondary Students

appliance
Learning to use small appliances

bank
Visiting a bank and learning about personal finance

shopping2
Grocery shopping

June 19 - 30

Sample Class Report

Living independently in an apartment, home, or college dormitory is an important aspect of adult living. School age students spend most of their school time learning academics, so they may not have opportunities to acquire and practice the equally important skills of daily living, which are essential for successful adult independence.

In this two-week class, students will explore a wide range of skills that underlie successful independence, such as:

  • Travel about town using public transportation
  • Learn to negotiate local businesses such as a grocery store and a mall
  • Practice money skills in the community, including paying and getting change
  • Visit a bank and learn about setting up and checking a bank account with adaptations for individuals with visual impairments
  • Visit apartment buildings and learn about setting up a living space
  • Explore the basics of housekeeping and clothing care
  • Prepare food and have friends over

In these and other shared experiences with peers, students will explore independent living, discover their strengths, and develop a personal plan to remediate areas where additional skills are needed. They will have the opportunity to visit with successful role models with visual impairments.

 

For information about program content, contact
Margaret Edwards
(512) 206-9476

For information about the application process, contact
Cathy Olsen
(512) 206-9182

 

Hosted by Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

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Wisconsin National Agenda

Property of Wisconsin Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired courtesy of the Wisconsin National Agenda Project

1 B & L Handheld Magnifier 5x

1 B & L Handheld Magnifier 3x-4x (7x)

1 Agfa Stand Magnifier 8x

1 Selsi 403 Piano Convex Magnifier

1 Magni-Rule 8" Bar Magnifier

1 4x12B Short Focus Handheld Monocular

1 6x16 Short Focus Handheld Monocular

1 8x20 Short Focus Handheld Monocular

2 Leaf Occluders (1 50 mm, 1 48 mm)

1 Patch Occluder

1 LEA Single Symbol Distance Acuity Flip Book with symbol chart

1 LEA Pocket Size Near Symbol Chart

1 HOTV Near Point Card

1 Feinbloom Distance Low Vision Test Chart

1 White Plastic Ruler

Hosted by Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

National Agenda Logo

Wisconsin National Agenda


For the Education of Children and Youths with Visual Impairments, Including Those with Multiple Disabilities

Wisconsin State Coordinator Lisa Tomberlin
CESA 6
P.O. Box 2568
Oshkosh, WI 54903

April 20, 2000
Dear Parents:
The National Agenda Committee of Wisconsin is still offering a limited number of FREE memberships to one of the national organizations for parents of visually impaired children. We encourage you to read the enclosed information regarding The Wisconsin Parents of Blind Children and The National Association for Parents of the Visually Impaired. These organizations both have state chapters. It is our hope that these organizations will offer support and information to you and your family. To join one of the organizations, fill out the appropriate application and mail to:

Peggy Trainor
Wisconsin Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1700 West State Street
Janesville, WI 53546

Please contact one of us if you have any questions:

Peggy Trainor at: 608-758-6124; or, 608-758-7030 (voice mail) or
e-mail
Karen Heesen at: 608-758-6130 or 608-758-7772 (voice mail).

We look forward to receiving your application(s).
Sincerely,
Karen Heesen
Peggy Trainor

Co-Leader, Goal 2 Co-Leader, Goal 2

Hosted by Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

National Agenda Logo

Wisconsin National Agenda

Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

from http://www.dpi.state.wi.us/dpi/een/pdf/2015.pdf

INSTRUCTIONS: To completed by a vision care specialist (ophthalmologist or optometrist). Send a completed copy to the referring individual or to the child's school district.
TYPE OR PRINT
CONFIDENTIAL
COMPLETE BOTH PAGES

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Student's Name ----
Sex ----
Date of Birth ----
Name of Parent ----
Address of Parent Street, City, County, State, Zip ----
Telephone Area/Number ----
Signature of Parent* ----
Date Signed ----

*Consent: Parent signature for Voluntary Release to county agency (if the child is B-3), local school district, Department of Public Instruction for purposes of educational programming and/or registry with the American Printing House for the Blind. This consent can be revoked at any time, cannot be redisclosed to others for any purpose, and is valid for three years from date signed.

II. REFERRAL

Name of Person Making Referral ----
Address Street, City, State, Zip ----
Telephone Area/Number ----

QUESTIONS AND CONCERNS BY REFERRING PERSON ----
PHYSICIAN RESPONSE ----

Were Low Vision aids recommended?
Yes ---- If Yes, please list.
No ----

III. Signatures

Name of Examiner Please Print ----
Date of Examination ----
Recommended Date For Next Exam ----
Signature of Examiner ----
M.D. ----
O.D. ----
Date Signed ----
Address Street, City, State, Zip ----
Telephone Area/Number ----

Student's Name: ----

IV. MEASUREMENTS

Measurements are:
Accurate ----
Approximate ----

Visual Acuity
Right Eye (O.D.)
Left Eye (O.S.)
Both Eyes (O.U.)
Distant Vision Without Correction With Best Correction
Near Vision in M Sizes Without Correction With Best Correction
Prescription Sph. Cyl. Axis Add
Instruments Used Preferential looking tests VEP (Visual Evoked Response) Lighthouse Feinbloom Snellen Lea Symbols HOTV Other

Is child determined to be legally blind (equivalent to 20/200 Snellen Acuity) for distance vision?
Yes ----
No ----

Field Loss
Tested Yes ---- No ----
If Yes Central ---- Peripheral----
Widest Diameter of Remaining Visual Field In Degrees
O.D. ----
O.S. ----

Is Child Legally Blind for field Restriction: 20 degrees or less
Yes ----
No ----

Does child exhibit deficits in:
Color Blindness ----
Depth Perception ----
Nightblindness ----
If unable to test, does the diagnosis suggest a visual acuity of 2/70 or less in the better eye after correction or a field restriction of 50 degrees or less?
Yes ----
No ----

V. CAUSE OF BLINDNESS OR VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

Present ocular and/or cortical condition(s) responsible for vision impairment and Etiology.
Etiology: ----
Present Ocular Pathology:
O.D. ----
O.S. ----
O.U. ----
Cortical Visual:
Yes ----
No ----

VI. PROGNOSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

A. Student's Vision Impairment
Stable ----
Degenerative ----
Uncertain ----
Potentially Degenerative ----
B. Recommended Treatment:
Patching ----
Drops ----
Pressure Checks ----
Low Vision Evaluation ----
Other Specify ----
C. Glasses Check all that apply:
Prescription ----
Tinted Lenses or Sunglasses ----
Safety Lenses ----
Not Needed ----
Worn constantly ----
Worn for distance viewing ----
Worn for close work ----
D. Physical Activities Is there a medical reason for limiting
participation in contact sports or physical education?
No ----
Yes ---- If yes, explain.