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by Nancy Levack
© TSBVI 1994 - 264 pages Order # 59422LVP (20 oz.)

Also available on disk - MAC or DOS (textfile-no forms) Order # 59422LVD 

Go to Table of Contents for this book.

Plan and implement programming by using these guidelines and suggestions for assessing and enhancing your student's visual functioning.

  • Diagnosing, assessing, and evaluating:
    • students who are young or delayed
    • common ophthalmological terms
    • suggested assessment instruments
    • genetic counseling
  • Medical information:
    • eye conditions/diseases
    • eye medications and their effects
    • physical conditions and the sensory systems
    • psychosocial implications
  • Strategies for teaching and adaptations:
    • enhancing visual functioning
    • modifying instruction
    • adapting materials and environment
    • low vision devices

Contents of Low Vision: A Resource Guide with Adaptations for Students with Visual Impairments

by Nancy Levack

Purpose of the Resource Guide

  • Intended Users
  • Intended Student Population

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Components of Programming

  • Philosophy
  • The Challenge of Programming for Students Who Are Visually Impaired
  • The Role of the Instructor
    • Assessment
    • Educational Programming
    • Support
  • Different Student Groups and Their Programming Needs
  • Programming for Students Who are Near, At, or Above Their Developmental Level
  • Programming for Students Who are Significantly Developmentally Delayed
  • Programming for Students Who Have Severe Cortical Visual Impairments
  • Additional Readings and Resources

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Assessment

  • The Assessment Process
    • Detection
    • Vision Screening
    • Examination by an Eye Specialist
    • Clinical Low Vision Evaluation
    • Functional Vision Evaluation
    • Learning Media Assessment
  • The Medical Examination and Report
  • Clinical Procedures
  • Common Medical Terms
  • Special Considerations for Successful Examinations
    • When the Students are Young or Have Developmental Disabilities
    • When the Students Are Capable of Communicating with the Doctor
  • Clinical Low Vision Evaluation
  • The Functional Vision Evaluation and Report
  • How to Use the Functional Vision Evaluation Observation Form
  • Recommended Components for the Functional Vision Evaluation Report
  • Assessing Students Who are Very Young or Who Have Significant Developmental Disabilities
  • The Learning Media Assessment
    • What it is
    • When a Student is Determined to be Functionally Blind
    • Guidelines for Making Decisions About Learning and Literary Media
  • Genetic Counseling
  • Assessing for Learning Disabilities
  • Additional Readings and Resources
    • Functional Vision Evaluations
    • Functional Vision Evaluations Designed for Students Who are Multiply Impaired

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Planning, Teaching and Evaluation

  • How to Choose the Tasks and Visual Skills That Need to be Taught
  • Choosing the Instructional Approach
    • Visual Environment Management
    • Visual Skills Training
    • Visually Dependent Task Training
  • General Guidelines for Modifying Instruction
  • Evaluation
  • Additional Readings and Resources

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Adaptations

  • Adaptations in Color and Contrast
  • Adaptations in Illumination
  • Adaptations in Space and Arrangement
  • Adaptations in Size and Distance
  • Examples of Print Sizes
  • Low Vision Devices
    • Optical Devices
      • Magnifiers
      • Telescopes
      • Microscopes
      • Field Utilization Aids
      • Other Optical Devices
    • Nonoptical Devices
    • Closed Circuit Televisions (CCTVs)
    • Computer Access
    • Evaluating for Technology Needs
    • Other Nonoptical Devices
  • Adaptations to Visual Cues
  • Adapting the Materials
  • Modifying the Immediate Workspace
  • Modifying the Larger Environment
  • Guidelines When Planning Adaptations
  • Identifying the Least Restrictive Adaptation
  • Adaptations for Students Who Also Have Cognitive Impairments
  • Adaptations for Students Who Also Have Learning Disabilities
  • Additional Readings and Resources

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Medical Information Related to Visual Impairment

  • The Anatomy of the Eye
  • How the Eye Works
  • Normal Vision Development
  • Outline of Visual Abilities
  • Eye Conditions
    • Genetic Conditions
    • Syndromes Which Impact Eye Conditions
    • Specific Eye Conditions and Diseases With Corresponding Adaptations
    • Chart
    • Other Conditions That Could Have Implications for the Eye
    • Eye Medications and Their Effects
    • Other Medications Which May Influence Eye Conditions
  • Additional Readings and Resources
    • Information About the Eye
    • Developmental Sequence of Vision
    • Eye Conditions

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Physical Conditions, the Sensory Systems, and How They Affect Visual Performance

  • Changes in Muscle Tone
    • Low Muscle Tone
    • Increased Muscle Tone
    • Fluctuating Muscle Tone
  • Movement Disorders
    • Athetosis
    • Spasticity
    • Ataxia
  • Reflex Activity Affecting Posture
    • Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (ATNR)
    • Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR)
  • Postural Control
    • Poor Balance
    • Poor Ocular-Motor Control
    • Poor Head Control
    • Poor Sitting Posture
    • Muscle Weakness
  • The Sensory Systems
  • Perception and the Integration of Vision with Other Forms of Sensory Input
    • How Perception Integrates Sensory Input
  • Impairment of the Tactile System
  • Impaired Proprioceptive Functioning
  • Inability to Fully Utilize Vestibular Sensation
  • Difficulty with Depth Perception
  • Difficulty with Form Perception
  • Difficulty Perceiving the Relative Position in Space
  • Additional Readings and Resources

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Psychosocial Implications of Visual Impairment

  • Personal Factors Which Affect Psychosocial Functioning
  • Social Factors Which Affect Psychosocial Functioning
  • The Students' Identity as a Person Who is Visually Impaired
  • Programming for the Issues Related to Social Skills
  • Positive Steps for Building Self-Esteem
  • Additional Readings and Resources
  • State of Texas Interagency Eye Examination Report (Master for Duplication)
  • Observations for the Functional Vision Evaluation (Master for Duplication)
  • Functional Vision Evaluation Report (Sample)
  • Instruments for Assessing Low Vision

Glossary

References

Index

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A Guide to Assist Teachers of Blind and Visually Impaired Students in Texas

by Peggy Wade

Book Excerpt
Read Chapter 3 or,
Read Chapter 3 (in PDF)

So, what exactly is transition planning? It is a process that insures school personnel, the student, and family, are planning an educational program that will help prepare the student for his identified adult-life outcomes. To effectively develop transition plans and related programming for students with visual impairments, information regarding all significant areas of adult functioning needs to be gathered. Skills the student will need in order to function as independently as possible are identified and included in his programming.

Information and resources to assist students, professionals, and families answer questions related to specific domains of adult living are included in this guide. The domains are:

  1. Employment Considerations
  2. Education and Training
  3. Housing and Related Resources
  4. Recreation and Leisure
  5. Medical and Health Issues
  6. Transportation and Mobility
  7. Financial Information
  8. Legal Considerations

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by Millie Smith and Nancy Levack
© TSBVI 1997 - 550 pages Order # 59429VMP (48 oz.)
Also available on disk - MAC or DOS (textfile-no forms) Order # 59429VMD

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"The" resource guide for VI certified teachers serving students in regular, special ed, and resource classrooms as itinerant and classroom teachers

  • Assessment guidelines with sample assessments and reproducible assessment tools and forms
  • Strategies for IEP development, instruction, and transition planning address common and uncommon issues VI certified teachers are confronted with daily
  • Information on adapting materials and environments includes tactual and visual symbols as a means of communication
  • Special needs of students with cortical visual impairment and post trauma vision syndrome
  • Biobehavioral state management for students with profound impairments
  • The importance of intervention for infants and toddlers
  • Meeting the needs of students with deafblindness and multiple impairments
  • Special considerations for students with visual and severe motor impairments
  • Adapting materials and environments
  • Orientation and mobility for students with multiple impairments
  • Issues related to student behaviors
  • Annotated resources
  • Answers to questions commonly asked

Contents of Teaching Students with Visual and Multiple Impairments: A Resource Guide

by Millie Smith and Nancy Levack

Population and Best Practices

  • Who Do We Serve? What Do We Provide?
    • The VI Teacher's Responsibility
      • Population
      • Incidence
      • Ages
      • Settings
      • Questions
      • References
    • Best Practices for VI Teachers Serving Students with Visual and Multiple Impairments
      • The VI Teacher's Responsibility
      • Teaming
      • Types of Services
        • Direct Pull-Out
        • Integrated Direct
        • Monitoring and Role Release
        • Consulting
      • Working with Parents
        • Assessment
        • IEP Development
        • Implementing Instruction
        • Reporting Progress
      • Working with Classroom Teachers
      • Working with Paraprofessionals
      • Working with Related Service Staff and Other Specialists
      • Working with Administrators
      • Questions
      • Annotated Resources
      • References
  • Best Practices Generally Accepted for Students with Multiple Impairments
    • The VI Teacher's Responsibility
    • Program Standards
    • Curricular Options
    • Instructional Setting Options
    • Instructional Strategy Options
      • Cooperative Learning
      • Thematic Units
      • Task Analysis
      • Routines
      • Matrixing
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References

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Roles of the VI Teacher

  • Assessment
    • The VI Teacher's Responsibility
    • The Importance of Collaborative Assessment
      • Guidelines for Sharing Information
      • Sharing with the Team Members
      • Sharing with the Parents
      • Sharing with Eye Specialists
      • Arena Assessment
    • Comprehensive Individual Assessment
      • Eligibility for VI Services
      • Screening
      • Eye Exam
      • Learning Media Assessment
      • Functional Vision Evaluation
      • Additional VI Assessments
      • Clinical Low Vision Evaluation
      • Orientation and Mobility Assessment
      • Reevaluations
      • Special Assessment Issues Related to Eligibility for Other Handicapping Conditions
      • Assessment of Learning Competencies
    • Sample Assessments
      • Learning Media Assessment
      • Sensory Response Assessment
      • Functional Vision Evaluation
      • Assessment of Biobehavioral States and Analysis of Related Influences
    • Questions
      • About Assessment
      • About the Eye Exam
      • About Functional Vision Evaluations
      • About Learning Media Assessments
    • Annotated Resources
    • Reference
  • IEP Development
    • The VI Teacher's Responsibility
    • Comparison of Traditional and Collaborative IEP Development
    • Writing Goals and Objectives
      • Prioritzing Goals and Objectives
      • Integrating Skills
    • Determination of Type and Amount of Service
    • Progress Reports and Evaluations
    • Modifications
      • Sample Individual Education Plan
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References
  • Instruction
    • The VI Teacher's Responsibility
    • Comparison of Traditional and Collaborative Instruction
    • Establishing a Schedule of Meaningful Activities
    • Choosing Settings for Instruction
    • Lesson Plans: Specific Adaptations and Strategies
    • Monitoring Effectiveness in Instruction
    • Visual Skill Instruction
      • Functional Context Vision Training Model
    • Tactual Skills Instruction
      • Guide for Functional Applications of Tactual Skills
    • Sample Instructional Tools
      • Planning Matrix
      • Daily Schedule
      • Routine and Data Sheet
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References
  • Transition
    • The VI Teacher's Responsibility
    • Goals of Successful Transition
    • Vocational Assessment for Students with Visual and Multiple Impairments
    • Person-Centered Transition Planning
    • System-Centered Transition Planning
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References

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Special Needs of Students with Visual and Multiple Impairments

  • Students with Cortical Visual Impairment and Post Trauma Vision Syndrome
    • Definition of Terms
    • Eligibility for VI Services
    • Cortical Visual Impairment
      • Characteristics
      • Suggestions and Interventions
    • Post Trauma Vision Syndrome
      • Characteristics
      • Suggestions and Interventions
    • Suggestions for Classroom Techniques
      • Communication
      • New Information
      • Spatial Orientation
      • Attention and Concentration
      • Task Completion
      • Impulse Control
      • Dealing with Anger
      • Social Integration
      • Social Conversation
      • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References
  • Biobehavioral State Management for Students with Profound Impairments
    • Definition
    • Assessing States and Influences of States
      • Environmental Influences
      • Medical Influences
      • Nutrition and Hydration Influences
    • Manipulating States
    • Using the Senses to Enhance Learning
      • Vision
      • Touch
      • Hearing
      • Taste and Smell
    • Questions
    • References
  • Infants and Toddlers
    • The Importance of Intervention
    • Working with Parents
    • Working with Infants and Toddlers
    • What Is ECI?
      • Interagency Cooperation
      • Orientation and Mobility Services
    • Working with ECI Teams
      • Assessment
      • IEPs and IFSPs
      • Implementation
    • The Importance of Screening
      • Screening for Visual Impairment
      • Screening for Motor Impairment
      • Screening for Auditory Impairment
      • Screening for Communication Problems
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References
  • Students with Deafblindness and Multiple Impairments
    • Definition and Eligibility for Service
    • Meeting the Needs of Students with Deafblindness
    • Best Practices for VI Teachers Who Serve Students with Deafblindness
    • Conditions with a High Likelihood of Vision and Auditory Loss
    • Basic Information on Auditory Impairments
      • Types of Hearing Loss
      • Conductive Impairment
      • Sensorineural Impairment
      • Mixed Hearing Impairment
      • Degrees of Hearing Loss
    • How to Screen Students with Visual Impairments for a Hearing Loss
    • Assessing the Functional Implications of Vision Loss with Regard to Sign Language and Fingerspelling for Students with Deafblindness
      • Assessment of Students Using Visual Communication Forms
      • Observations, Modifications, Adaptations, and Teaching Strategies
    • Educational Impact of Vision Loss by Students Who Are Hearing Impaired
    • Educational Impact of Hearing Loss on Students Who Are Visually Impaired
    • Service Delivery for Deafblind Individuals
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References
  • Students with Visual and Severe Motor Impairments
    • The Importance of Intervention
    • Students with Cerebral Palsy
    • Positioning
      • Visual Functions Affected by Position
    • Sensory Integration
    • Tactual Defensiveness
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References
  • Adapting Materials and Environments
    • Adapting Visual and Tactual Materials
    • Adapting Materials Used for Communication and Functional Reading
      • Definition of Terms and Types of Symbols Used for Communication and Reading
      • Progression of Tactual Symbols
      • Progression of Visual Symbols
      • Visual Symbols for Low Vision Students
    • Adapting Materials for Counting and Computation
      • How to Use the Counting Method
    • Adapting Electronic Devices
    • Adapting Environments
    • When Outdoors
      • When Cooking and Doing Household Chores
      • When Participating in Recreational Activities
      • When Reading and Writing
      • Other Adaptations Used Successfully
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References
  • Orientation and Mobility for Students with Multiple Impairments
    • The Role of the Orientation and Mobility Instructor
    • Early Movement
      • Body Awareness
      • Reaching and Grasping
      • Crawling and Walking
    • Concept Development
    • Travel Skills
      • Canes and Adaptive Mobility Devices
      • Artificial Landmarks on Familiar Routes
      • A Model Functional Orientation and Mobility Program
      • Orientation and Mobility Skills for the Child with Visual and Motor Impairments
      • Techniques for Students Using a Wheelchair
      • Techniques for Students Using a Walker or Support Cane
    • Suggestions for Encouraging Independence in the Home and Classroom
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References
  • Issues Related to Student Behaviors
    • Behavior and Communication
    • Sensorineural Causes of Behaviors
      • Responding to Sensorineural Causes of Behavior
    • Physical Causes of Behaviors
      • Responding to Physical Causes of Behaviors
    • Task-Related Causes of Behaviors
      • Responding to Task-Related Causes of Behaviors
    • Stereotypical Behaviors
    • Self-Injurious Behaviors
    • Developing Behavior Management Plans
    • Questions
    • Annotated Resources
    • References

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Appendices

  • Appendix 1. Assessment Tools
    • State of Texas Interagency Eye Examination Report
    • ECI Vision Screening Form
    • Picture Assessment
    • Informal Assessment of Tactual Symbol Use
    • Assessment of Auditory Functioning
    • Assessment of Biobehavioral States and Analysis of Related Influences
    • Infused Skills Assessment
  • Appendix 2. Sample Forms
    • Instructional Modifications/Supports for Deafblindness
      • Documenting Modifications in the IEP for the Student with Deafblindness
    • Planning Matrix
    • Daily Schedule
    • Team Management Plan
    • Team Meeing Worksheet
    • Role Release Plan
    • Routine and Data Sheet
    • Biological Information Chart

Glossary

Index

An Orientation & Mobility Curriculum for Students with Visual Impairments, 3rd Edition

see TAPS - Supplemental Flash Drive - This flash drive contains evaluation tools, a report template, and other supplementary materials to be used when evaluating and providing instruction to individual students.

by Rona Pogrund, Debra Sewell, Heidi Anderson, Lisa Calaci, Mary Faith Cowart, Carolina Gonzalez, Ruth Ann Marsh, & Burnsteen Roberson-Smith. Major contributors include Ryan Conlin, Carol Dancey and Christopher Tabb. Authors of Part 4 Supplement are Linda Myers and Wendy Scheffers.
© TSBVI 2012

Table of Contents for this book.

For orientation and mobility specialists who serve students ages 3 to 21 who may also have other impairments. This curriculum includes goals, objectives, and teaching strategies as well as functional mobility tasks, for the following environments: home/living, campus, residential, commercial and public transportation, as well as an ambulatory devices section. The four-part set also includes extensive appendices containing a wide range of O&M related topics and a supplement that details street crossing strategies.

The four-part curriculum set includes:

Part 1: The Curriculum with Goals, Objectives and Teaching Strategies

Part 2: Comprehensive Initial and Ongoing Evaluation

Part 3: Appendices

Part 4: Supplement: Street Crossings for Travelers Who Are Visually Impaired

The evaluation booklet can also be purchased separately. This booklet is intended for use with an individual student throughout his or her school years.

The curriculum is spiral-bound.

$90.00, Order # 59448 TAPS 
or textfile - Order # 59448 TAPS text

TAPS, 3rd Edition, Supplemental Flash Drive

$30.00, Order # 59450TAPSFD

TAPS – Comprehensive Initial and Ongoing Evaluation

The spiral bound evaluation booklet (118 pp.) is intended for use with an individual student throughout his or her school years and features:

  • Instructions to the examiner
  • A student information form
  • Interview questions for the student
  • Interview questions for the parent, or guardian
  • Interview questions for school personnel familiar with the student
  • Score-sheets for functional mobility tasks
  • Evaluation pages for the goals and skills from the curriculum organized by their domains: home/living environment, campus environment, residential environment, commercial environment, public transportation and ambulatory devices
  • Plenty of spaces for comments

$20.00, Order # 59449 TAPS-Eval


Table of Contents (four-part set)

Part 1: The Curriculum

  • Description and Use 1
    • Definitions 2
    • Philosophy 3
    • Evidence-Based Practices 4
    • Models of O&M Instruction 5
    • Curriculum Design 7
      • Intended Population 7
      • Components of the Curriculum 8
        • Comprehensive Initial and Ongoing Evaluation 8
        • Functional Mobility Tasks 9
        • Educational Goals and Objectives 10
        • Teaching Strategies 11
        • Appendices and Supplement 11
    • Using the Curriculum for Program Development 12
      • Building Rapport 12
      • Evaluating the Student 14
        • Using the Comprehensive Initial and Ongoing Evaluation Booklet 14
        • Gathering Additional Information 15
          • Sample Evaluation 16
        • Writing the Evaluation Report 17
          • Excerpt from Sample Evaluation Report 17
      • Planning Instruction 18
        • Choosing an Approach 18
        • IEP Goals and Objectives 19
          • Individualized Education Program IEP Example 21
      • Planning the Lesson 22
        • Lesson Plan Example 23
      • Instructing the Student 24
          • Creativity 24
          • Criteria 24
          • Age-Appropriateness 24
          • Teaching Environment 25
        • Individual Progress 25
        • Monitoring Progress/Data Collection 26
          • Data Sheet Example 26
          • Blank Data Sheet 27
        • Effective Teaching Strategies 28
        • Sensitivity Towards Students 30
      • Reinforcement 31
      • Ongoing Evaluation 31
  • Working with Students Who Have Multiple Impairments 32
    • Purposeful Movement 35
    • Active Learning: Orientation and Mobility Implications for Students with Severe Multiple Impairments 36
    • Cortical (Cerebral) Visual Impairment (CVI) 45
  • Educational Goals and Objectives with Teaching Strategies 55
    • Home/Living Environment 56
      • Functional Mobility Tasks 57
      • Attending Behaviors 58
      • Auditory Abilities 63
      • Receptive Language 67
      • Expressive Language 69
      • Posture and Gait 72
      • Body Image 77
      • Laterality 82
      • Turns 86
      • Directionality 88
      • Quantitative Concepts 90
      • Directional/Positional Concepts 92
      • Time-Distance Concepts 94
      • Ordinal Sequencing 95
      • Colors 96
      • Geometric Shapes 97
      • Basic Skills 98
        • Guide Technique 98
        • Hand Trailing 104
        • Upper Body/Forearm Protective Technique 106
        • Lower Body Protective Technique 107
        • Upper and Lower Body Protective Techniques 107
        • Protective Techniques and Trailing 108
        • Squaring Off 108
        • Parallel Alignment 109
        • Dropped Objects 109
      • Landmarks and Clues 110
      • Basic Spatial Awareness 112
    • Campus Environment 114
      • Functional Mobility Tasks 115
      • Attitude and Behavior 116
      • Adaptive Mobility Devices 118
      • Cane Techniques 127
      • On-Campus Orientation and Mobility 140
      • Cardinal Directions 145
      • Distance Low Vision Devices 151
    • Residential Environment 162
      • Functional Mobility Tasks 163
      • Modified Forearm Protective Technique 164
      • Vehicle Familiarization 167
      • Residential Area Travel 169
      • Residential Street Crossings 184
      • Address Systems 200
      • Rural Travel 202
      • Night Travel 207
      • Adverse Weather Conditions 210
    • Commercial Environment 214
      • Functional Mobility Tasks 215
      • Commercial Area Travel 216
      • Commercial Area Street Crossings 230
      • Community Experiences 242
    • Public Transportation 252
      • Functional Mobility Tasks 253
      • Public Transportation Systems 254
    • Ambulatory Devices 266
      • Introduction 267
      • Wheelchair Skills Checklist 272
      • Use of a Wheelchair 277
      • Use of a Walker 294
      • Use of Crutches 301
      • Use of One-Handed Support Device 308
  • References 315
  • Additional Professional References 321
  • Resources 333
  • Glossary 345
  • Index 365

Part 2: Comprehensive Initial and Ongoing Evaluation

  • Instructions to the Examiner 2
  • Student Information 5
    • Interview Questions for the Student 6
  • Interview Questions for the Parent or Guardian 10
  • Interview Questions for School Personnel 14
  • Areas of Evaluation 18
    • Home/Living 18
    • Campus 44
    • Residential 60
    • Commercial 80
    • Public Transportation 94
    • Ambulatory Devices 103

Part 3: Appendices

  1. Resources for Explaining the Benefits of O&M 1
  2. Legal Issues in Orientation and Mobility 3
  3. Research Studies in O&M Supporting Evidence-Based Practices 5
  4. Early O&M Evaluations 49
    • Purposeful Movement Behaviors 50
    • O&M Assessment: Early Years of Birth through Three Years 57
  5. Effective Questioning 83
  6. Problem Solving 89
  7. Adaptive Mobility Devices 95
  8. Cane Selection 119
  9. O&M Instruction with Students Using Dog Guides 125
  10. O&M Strategies for Working with Students with Deafblindness and Other Communication Challenges 129
  11. Promoting Movement 147
    • Exercises 148
    • Movement Activities 175
    • Yoga 179
  12. Using Tactile Maps as an Orientation Aid 189
  13. Assistive Technology Used in O&M 211
  14. Personal Safety in the Community 225
  15. Alternative Indoor Activities 229
  16. Music Motivation 237
  17. O&M Terms in Spanish 241
  18. Evaluation and Training of Visual Efficiency Skills 251
  19. O&M Evaluation Report Template and Sample Reports 277
  • Glossary 317
  • Index 337

Part 4: Supplement: Street Crossings for Travelers Who Are Visually Impaired

  • Introduction 3
  1. Intersection Analysis 7
  2. Street Crossings 117
  3. Scanning to Monitor Traffic 205
  4. Additional Tools 231
  5. References 255
  6. Glossary 257

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Information for Occupational and Physical Therapists Working with Students with Visual Impairments

By Chris Strickling, OTR
© TSBVI 1998 - 42 pages Order # 59420VMP (4 oz.)

As the title states, occupational and physical therapists will welcome this informative booklet when working with children who are visually impaired. Ms. Strickling offers insightful information on:

  • Vision and early development, and how incidental learning needs to be compensated
  • Movement and how it influences primitive reflexes and postural tone
  • Sensation and how it impacts proprioceptive and vestibular input
  • Common postural characteristics of children with visual impairments and intervention techniques
  • Whole body stimulation and awareness
  • Visual diagnoses
  • The importance of teaming orientation and mobility instructors, adaptive physical education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired, physical and occupational therapists, and parents
  • Educational impacts of low vision in regards to tactual and incidental learning, special positioning needs, environmental considerations, and social relationships

Table of Contents

  • Vision and Early Development
  • Movement
  • Sensation
  • Common Postural Characteristics
  • Common Problems with Hand Function
  • Understanding Visual Diagnoses
  • The Importance of Teaming
  • Educational Impacts of Low Vision
  • Resources

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By Virginia E. Bishop, Ph.D.
©TSBVI 2006 270 pp Order # 59400 BISH
also available as a text file

The present is a product of the past. You have to know where you've been to understand where you are, and where you should be going. To help us understand where we've been, Dr. Virginia Bishop has compiled a history of services to blind and visually impaired infants and preschoolers. This book provides solid informational background of how we arrived where we are today, and serves as a reminder to all of us that we have a rich heritage of serving children, birth to five. This history chronicles the evolution of services and depicts the legacy of the leaders in our field.

Contents

  • Introduction
  • Beginnings
  • The RLF Era
  • Changing Times (1950s and 1960s)
  • The Government Steps In (1970s)
  • The Expansion Years (1980s and 1990s)
  • Into the Twenty-First Century
  • Appendices

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Making Evaluation Meaningful: Determining additional eligibilities and appropriate instructional strategies for blind and visually impaired students
Determining additional eligibilities and appropriate instructional strategies for blind and visually impaired students

By Marnee Loftin
© TSBVI 2006 430 pp Order # 59443MEM also available as a textfile

Table of Contents

Meaningful evaluation of students with a visual impairment is an especially complicated task. The population of students with visual impairment is diverse. Often these students have additional impairments that impact their growth and progress. The combined effects must be closely examined to determine effective instructional strategies. Meaningful evaluation will depend on the knowledge and ability of staff to administer tests and interpret results. Good evaluation and assessment results are essential to provide a foundation for the educational planning process.

This book, Making Evaluation Meaningful, is intended to provide guidance to evaluation personnel, teachers of the visually impaired, and families in making the best possible decisions regarding student evaluation. The beginning chapters include basic information about the characteristics of students with visual impairment, as well as information about preparing for evaluation, including helpful observation and interview protocols.

The individual chapters of this guide include pertinent information on types of testing such as Intelligence Testing, Adaptive Behavior Testing, Emotional Behavior Testing, and Educational Evaluations. Specifically addressed are many of the additional impairments seen in our student population, such as Mental Retardation, Learning Disabilities, Autism/Pervasive Development Disorders (PDD), Traumatic Brain Injury, and Significant Multiple Impairment. Extensive Case Studies are included for each of these chapters to allow readers to understand how the concepts are applied in an evaluation situation.


Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgements
  • Glossary of Educational Terminology Used in this Book

Chapter I

  • Introduction
  • Evaluation of Students with Visual Impairments
  • Characteristics of Students with Visual Impairments
  • Issues That May Impact Learning and Development
  • Visual Impairment is Not a Single Condition

Chapter II

  • Preparing for Evaluation
  • Determining the Need for Evaluation
  • Beginning an Evaluation
  • Information for Parents About Evaluation
  • Consultation Between TVI and Evaluation Staff
  • Functional Vision Evaluation and Learning Media Assessment: Impact on Evaluation 33
  • Cautions in Identification of Other Eligibilities
  • General Guidelines for Testing Students with Visual Impairments
  • Evaluation Checklist
  • Diagnostic Do's
  • Diagnostic Don'ts
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Functional Vision Evaluation/Learning Media Assessment Report 1
  • Functional Vision Evaluation/Learning Media Assessment Report 2

Chapter III

  • Observations and Interviews
  • Observation During the Evaluation Process
  • Interviews as a Source of Information
  • Observation and Interview Forms

Chapter IV

  • Intelligence
  • General Information
  • Possible Impact of Visual Impairment on Specific Subtests of the WISC/WAIS
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Chapter V

  • Adaptive Behavior
  • General Information
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Chapter VI

  • Emotional Behavior
  • General Information
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Case Study  

Chapter VII

  • Educational Evaluations
  • General Information
  • Gifted and Talented
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Educational Report 1 - Informal Reading Inventory (Print)
  • Educational Report 2 - Informal Reading Inventory (Braille)
  • Educational Report 3 - Key Math Diagnostic Inventory of Essential Mathematics

Chapter VIII

  • Mental Retardation
  • General Information
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Case Study

Chapter IX

  • Learning Disabilities
  • General Information
  • Summary of Suggested Procedure for Determination of Learning Disabilities in a Student
  • with Visual Impairment
  • Suggested Summary Statement
  • Other Characteristics of Specific Learning Disabilities
  • Auditory Processing Problems
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Case Study 1

Chapter X

  • Autism/Pervasive Developmental Disorders
  • General Information for Autism/PPD
  • Autistic Disorders in Students with Visual Impairments
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Case Study
  • Asperger's Disorder
  • Significant Differences
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Case Study

Chapter XI

  • Traumatic Brain Injury and Other Neurological Insults
  • General Information
  • Federal Educational Guidelines Information
  • Eventual Prognosis for Recovery
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Case Study

Chapter XII

  • Significant Multiple Impairments
  • General Information
  • General Guidelines
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Case Study

Chapter XIII

  • Instructional Strategies
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Auditory Processing Problems
  • Autism/PDD
  • Asperger's Disorder
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Mental Retardation
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
  • Traumatic Brain Injury

APPENDICES

  • Appendix A " VI Eligibility Criteria
  • Appendix B " Additional Facts about Specific Visual Conditions
  • Appendix C " References
  • Appendix D " Sources for Evaluation Materials

by Alan J. Koenig and M. Cay Holbrook
© TSBVI 1995 - 220 pages Order # 59423LMP (22 oz.)
Also available on disk - MAC or DOS (textfile-no forms) Order # 59423LMD

A limited quantity of paper braille books are available. Please indicate on the order form when you want to order a braille edition.

Go to Table of Contents of this book.

A how-to resource guide for assessing and evaluating appropriate learning and literacy media for your student including reproducible forms

  • Designed for teachers and diagnosticians working with visually impaired students of all ages:
    • Infants and preschoolers
    • Students in academic programs
    • Students with additional disabilities
  • Featured topics:
    • Use of sensory channels
    • Determining types of general learning media
    • Selecting literacy media
    • Making decisions about functional learning and literacy media

Contents of Learning Media Assessment of Students with Visual Impairments:
A Resource Guide

by Alan J. Koenig and M. Cay Holbrook

Chapter 1: Introduction

  • Learning Media and Literacy
  • What is Learning Media Assessment?
  • Braille Legislation
    • Typical Requirements
    • Using this Guide
  • Overview of the Learning Media Assessment
    • Sensory Channels
    • General Learning Media
    • Literacy Media
    • Conventional and Functional Literacy Programs
    • Best Practices
  • Diagnostic Teaching
    • An Illustration
    • Holistic Assessment
    • Initial Decision
    • Continuous Assessment
  • Assessing When English is a Second Language
  • Summary

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Chapter 2: Use of Sensory Channels

  • Overview
  • Applicable Populations
  • Materials
  • Procedures
    • Using Form 2: Use of Sensory Channels
    • Interpretation of Data
  • Case Studies
  • Summary

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Chapter 3: Determining Types of General Learning Media

  • Overview
  • Applicable Populations
  • Materials
  • Procedures
    • Using Form 3: General Learning Media Checklist
    • Interpretation of Data
  • Case Studies
  • Summary

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Chapter 4: Selecting Literacy Media: Initial Decision

  • Overview
  • Applicable Populations
  • When to Make a Decision
    • Using Form 4: Indicators of Readiness for a Conventional Literacy Program
    • Interpretation of Data
  • Materials
  • Procedures
    • Using Form 5: Initial Selection of Literacy Medium
    • Additional Observations
    • Interpretation of Data
    • Making a Decision
  • Case Studies
  • Decision-Making Guide
    • Use of Sensory Information
    • Working Distances and Size Preferences
    • Information on Visual Impairment
    • Information on Additional Disabilities
  • Summary

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Chapter 5: Selecting Literacy Media: Continuing As:essment

  • Overview
  • Applicable Populations
  • Materials
  • Procedures
    • Using Form 6: Continuing Assessment of Literacy Media
    • Additional Information on Visual Functioning
    • Reading Efficiency
    • Academic Achievement
    • Handwriting
    • Literacy Tools
    • Using Form 7: Literacy Tools Inventory
    • Interpretation of Data
  • Case Study
  • Decision-Making Guide
    • Additional Information on Visual Functioning
    • Reading Efficiency
    • Academic Achievement
    • Handwriting
    • Literacy Tools
  • Summary

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Chapter 6: Selecting Learning and Literacy Media for Students with Additional Disabilities

  • Overview
    • Diagnostic Teaching
  • Applicable Populations
  • Materials
  • Procedures
    • Using Form 2: Use of Sensory Channels
    • Interpretation of Data
    • Using Form 8: Functional Learning Media Checklist
    • Interpretation of Data
    • Using Form 9: Indicators of Readiness for a Functional Literacy Program
    • Interpretation of Data
    • Using Form 10: Initial Selection of Functional Literacy Medium
    • Interpretation of Data
    • Using Form 11: Continuing Assessment of Functional Literacy Media
    • Interpretation of Data
  • Case Study
  • Decision-Making Guide
  • Summary

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Appendices

  • Appendix A: Texas Braille Bill and Regulations
  • Appendix B: Benefits of Braille
  • Appendix C: Continuing Assessment: Selection of Appropriate Print Media for Students with Low Vision
    • Overview
    • Applicable Populations
    • Materials
    • Screening Version
    • Comprehensive Version
    • Data Collection
    • Data Analysis
    • Interpretation
  • Appendix D: Qualitative Analysis System: Guidelines for Use
  • Appendix E: Reading Strategy Lessons
  • Appendix F: Selected Informal Reading Inventories
  • Appendix G: Blank Assessment Forms
  • Appendix H: Quick Reference Guide

References

Glossary

Index

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A Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists

by Maria L. Muñoz, M.A., CCC-SLP
© TSBVI 1998 - 42 pages Order # 59420LAI (4 oz.)

This booklet hopes to give Speech and Language Pathologists (SLPs) some guidelines for providing appropriate assessment and intervention services to children with visual impairments by addressing issues such as:

  • Understanding visual impairment
  • Developmental differences between children with vision and those who are visually impaired
  • Assessment and intervention strategies and adaptations
  • Considerations for infants and culturally and linguistically diverse students

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Visual Impairments - What SLPs should know
  • Language Development
    • The Importance of Experience
    • Developmental Differences
    • First Words
    • Pre-Linguistic Communication
    • Expressive and Receptive Language
    • Developmental Red Flags
  • Assessment
    • The Importance of Teamwork
    • Standardized Tests
    • Informal Assessment Procedures
    • Assessment Administration Considerations
  • Intervention
    • The Importance of Team Work
    • Effective Intervention Strategies
    • Calendar Systems
    • Tactual Symbols
    • Experience Stories
    • Video-, Story-, and Song-Based Activities
    • Classroom-Based Intervention
    • Conversation Groups
  • Special Considerations for Children Birth to Three
  • Multicultural Issues
    • Limited English Proficient Children
    • Attitudes and Expectations
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography

Infants and Toddlers with Visual Impairments

by
Virginia E. Bishop, Ph.D.
1998

PREFACE

In 1991, Region XIII Education Service Center asked me to put together a little handbook for their early childhood teachers, to help them understand the possible effects of visual impairments on early learning. Apparently, the handbook met a need, for requests have come for it from all over Texas, from other locations in the United States, and from early childhood programs in other countries.

In 1996, the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired asked me to update the handbook, for inclusion in a vision screening packet. Materials were intended to help early childhood personnel identify young children who might be visually impaired, so that appropriate referrals could be made for medical follow-up and the inclusion of a VI professional educator on the early intervention team.

The title of the original manual - Preschool Children with Visual Impairments - suggests that it is most useful with the 3-5 age group, and many of the ideas for programming are appropriate for that age range. Since there was no specific emphasis on the birth-to-3 age group, this accompanying handbook has been written to fill that gap. It is intended that the two handbooks be used together, since many basic philosophies and ideas expressed in the original handbook will not be repeated in this manual. Moreover, the first handbook may be used as a reference for the second. (See Table of Contents for the original manual, in the Appendix of this handbook.) The two manuals together should provide a continuum of information and ideas for young children with visual impairments. It is hoped that the reader will refer to both guides as needed.

VB

Dr. Virginia Bishop; 4312 Duval St. #206; Austin, TX 78751

INTRODUCTION

P.L. 99-457 extended access to special services for children with disabilities down to birth. Part of this mandate, however, allowed each state's governor to decide which state agency would oversee the provision of services for the Birth-to-3 age group. Some states' education departments were given this responsibility, simply extending their already mandated preschool services down to include the B-3 age group. In the state of Texas (as in some other states), the Department of Health was appointed as the "lead agency," so it is the early childhood specialists working under the Department of Health umbrella of services, who locate, evaluate, and provide leadership in coordinating services for disabled children from birth to age 3.

A "Memorandum of Agreement" between the Interagency Council on Early Childhood Intervention and the Texas Education Agency establishes a "statewide system of services which ensures that all children, birth to two, with auditory and/or visual impairments, receive services as outlined in Part H of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and subsequent amendments." (from the Memorandum). It is this agreement that creates the cooperative arrangement between early childhood interventionists (ECI), school districts, and VI teachers. It places responsibility for screening and identifying young children with possible visual impairments on the ECI personnel; referral is made to the local school district who will add the VI teacher to the IFSP team when the child has a visual impairment. Not only will VI teachers perform the state mandated Functional Vision Evaluation (which ECI personnel are not certified to do), but they can also do a Learning Media Assessment and contribute valuable information to the program planning process. They can also make suggestions for early intervention activities which can help to alleviate or eliminate delays in development caused by visual impairments. The VI teacher can provide direct and/or consultative services to families & their VI children.

This handbook is intended to help ECI personnel understand the importance of early identification, and how visual impairments may impede development if appropriate intervention is not provided. The cooperative efforts of both ECI staff and VI teachers is essential if infants and toddlers with visual impairments are to have the opportunities to develop, learn, and realize their potential.

(especially when teaching social and recreational skills)

by Valerie Perwein & Nancy Levack
© TSBVI 1996 - 48 pages Order # 59421ILS (7 oz.)
Note: This curriculum is sold unbound and printed on 3-hole punched 8 1/2 x 11 paper ready for a ring binder.

This booklet can serve as a basis for inservice, especially when using the Independent Living Curriculum to teach from.

  • Information about teaching social and recreational skills
  • How to choose the right objectives and teaching strategies
  • Examples of teaching strategies
  • Question and strategy forms

Independent Living: Activity Routines

©TSBVI Revised 2009 - 258 pp. - Order # 59421IAP or textfile (22 oz.)

A collection of routines for the following goals from the Independent Living curriculum:

  • Personal Hygiene and Grooming
  • Eating
  • Food Management
  • Housekeeping
  • Money

Each routine refers to target skills from the curriculum and points out the specific challenges related to visual impairment a student may encounter. Suggested materials, methods, and adaptations will help in instruction. Sequenced steps outline the basic routine. Special considerations for students who have multiple disabilities are included also. The routines are sold unbound printed on 3-hole punched 8 1/2 x 11 paper ready for ring binders. (258 pp.)

Assessment & Ongoing Evaluation booklet

© TSBVI 1993 - 148 pages Order # 59421ILE (18 oz.), or database Order # 59421AED

 

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Contents for Independent Living: A Curriculum with Adaptations for Students with Visual Impairments

by Robin Loumiet and Nancy Levack

Description and Use

  • Philosophy
  • Description and Use of the Curriculum
    • Curriculum Design
    • Intended Population
    • Who Can Use the Curriculum
    • Where to Use the Curriculum
    • How to Use the Curriculum
  • Description of the Goal and Skills Section
    • General Considerations for Teaching
    • Skills and Teaching Suggestions
    • What the Icons Mean
  • Descriptions of the Appendices and Supplementary Packe
  • Assessment
    • Initial Assessment
    • On-Going Evaluation
  • Instructional Planning
    • Selecting Skills from the Curriculum
    • Rewording Skills in the Curriculum
    • Adding New Skills
    • Planning Lessons
    • IEP Planning
    • Transferring Skills from the Curriculum to a Student's IEP
  • Teaching Students with Visual Impairments
    • Effective Instruction
    • Hand-Over-Hand Assistance
    • Task Analysis
    • Mediation
    • Modelling
    • Role Play
    • Identifying Adaptations to Use and When to Use Them
    • Adaptations for Increasing Visual Efficiency
    • Visual Adaptations
    • Tactual Adaptations
    • Using Audio and Audio-Visual Materials
    • Using Models

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Volume I: Social Competence

  • Social Competence Goals
  • Introduction
    • Why Teach Social Skills
    • Reasons for Delays in the Development of Social Competence
    • Effective Strategies for Teaching Social Skills
    • Resources for Teaching Social Skills
  • Interaction with Family, Peers, and Other
  • Self-Concept
  • Recognition and Expression of Emotions
  • Nonverbal Communication
  • Values Clarification
  • Personal and Social Aspects of Sexuality
  • Physical Aspects of Sexuality
  • Courteous Behavior
  • Problem Solving, Decision Making, and Planning
  • Scholastic Success
  • Personal and Civic Responsibility
  • Appendices
  • Sample Lessons on Conversations
  • Social Skills Curricula
  • Student Books Related to Social Competence
  • Audio and Audio-Visual Materials
  • Catalogs for Speciality Items
  • Glossary
  • Evaluation Forms
  • References
  • Index

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Volume II: Self-Care and Maintenance of Personal Environment

  • Self-Care and Maintenance of Personal Environment Goals
  • Introduction
    • Why Teach Self-Care and Maintenance of Personal Environment
    • Instructional Setting
    • Task Analyses
    • Initiative and Problem Solving
  • Dressing
  • Clothing Management
  • Personal Hygiene and Grooming
  • Toileting and Feminine Hygiene
  • Eating
  • Eating in Different Settings
  • Food Management
  • Housekeeping and Home Maintenance
  • Housing
  • Telephone Use
  • Time Concepts
  • Obtaining and Using Money
  • Health and Safety
  • Self-Advocacy
  • Appendices
  • Sample Lesson on Unbuttoning
  • Sample Lesson on Shopping
  • Audio and Audio-Visual Materials
  • Resources for Task Analyses of Self-Care
  • Resources for Adapted Cookbooks
  • Catalogs for Speciality Items
  • Glossary
  • Evaluation Forms
  • References
  • Index

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Volume III: Play and Leisure

  • Play and Leisure Goals
  • Introduction
    • Why Teach Play and Leisure
    • Play
    • Leisure
    • Resources
  • Management of Leisure Time
  • Solitary Play and Leisure Activities
  • Social Play and Leisure Activities
  • Physical Games and Sports
  • Enjoyment of Pets and Nature
  • Music and Dance
  • Arts and Crafts
  • Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Drama
  • Science and Technology
  • Appendices
  • Sample Lesson on on Playing a Board Game
  • Catalogs for Speciality Items
  • Glossary
  • Evaluation Forms
  • References
  • Index

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by Robin Loumiet and Nancy Levack
© TSBVI 1993 - 3 Volumes . Order # 59421ILP (106 oz.) sold only in sets
Also available on disk - MAC or DOS (textfiles-no forms) Order # 59421ILD

Table of Contents for these books.
Companion Books

Vol. I: Social Competence (248 pp.)
Vol. II: Self-Care and Maintenance of Personal Environment (296 pp.)
Vol. III: Play and Leisure (148 pp.)

This bestseller will help you in assessing, teaching, and evaluating students from school age to adulthood who will live independently or with minimal assistance in social, self-care, and leisure skills.

This three volume curriculum is accompanied by reproducible Assessment and Ongoing Evaluation forms. A booklet of these forms can also be purchased separately.

  • Designed for teaching in public schools, residential schools, and rehabilitation centers, it features:
    • age-appropriate skills
    • adaptations
    • professional resources
    • student resources
    • examples of competence
    • evaluation forms
    • examples for lesson planning
  • A tool for educating students to:
    • improve social competence
    • take care of themselves and maintain their personal environments
    • improve their quality of life and find fulfillment from leisure pursuits
    • apply knowledge and skills acquired from language arts, mathematics, and other academic courses as well as skills from orientation and mobility instruction and perceptual training in real life situations

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Independent Living: From IEP to Teaching Strategies...How Do We Get There? (especially when teaching social and recreational skills)

by Valerie Perwein & Nancy Levack
© TSBVI 1996 - 48 pages Order # 59421ILS (7 oz.)
Note: This curriculum is sold unbound and printed on 3-hole punched 8 1/2 x 11 paper ready for a ring binder.

This booklet can serve as a basis for inservice, especially when using the Independent Living Curriculum to teach from.

  • Information about teaching social and recreational skills
  • How to choose the right objectives and teaching strategies
  • Examples of teaching strategies
  • Question and strategy forms

Independent Living: Activity Routines

©TSBVI Revised 2009 - 258 pp. - Order # 59421IAP or textfile (22 oz.)

A collection of routines for the following goals from the Independent Living curriculum:

  • Personal Hygiene and Grooming
  • Eating
  • Food Management
  • Housekeeping
  • Money

Each routine refers to target skills from the curriculum and points out the specific challenges related to visual impairment a student may encounter. Suggested materials, methods, and adaptations will help in instruction. Sequenced steps outline the basic routine. Special considerations for students who have multiple disabilities are included also. The routines are sold unbound printed on 3-hole punched 8 1/2 x 11 paper ready for ring binders. (258 pp.)

Assessment & Ongoing Evaluation booklet

© TSBVI 1993 - 148 pages Order # 59421ILE (18 oz.), or database Order # 59421AED

 

Go to top


Contents for Independent Living: A Curriculum with Adaptations for Students with Visual Impairments

by Robin Loumiet and Nancy Levack

Description and Use

  • Philosophy
  • Description and Use of the Curriculum
    • Curriculum Design
    • Intended Population
    • Who Can Use the Curriculum
    • Where to Use the Curriculum
    • How to Use the Curriculum
  • Description of the Goal and Skills Section
    • General Considerations for Teaching
    • Skills and Teaching Suggestions
    • What the Icons Mean
  • Descriptions of the Appendices and Supplementary Packe
  • Assessment
    • Initial Assessment
    • On-Going Evaluation
  • Instructional Planning
    • Selecting Skills from the Curriculum
    • Rewording Skills in the Curriculum
    • Adding New Skills
    • Planning Lessons
    • IEP Planning
    • Transferring Skills from the Curriculum to a Student's IEP
  • Teaching Students with Visual Impairments
    • Effective Instruction
    • Hand-Over-Hand Assistance
    • Task Analysis
    • Mediation
    • Modelling
    • Role Play
    • Identifying Adaptations to Use and When to Use Them
    • Adaptations for Increasing Visual Efficiency
    • Visual Adaptations
    • Tactual Adaptations
    • Using Audio and Audio-Visual Materials
    • Using Models

Go to top

Volume I: Social Competence

  • Social Competence Goals
  • Introduction
    • Why Teach Social Skills
    • Reasons for Delays in the Development of Social Competence
    • Effective Strategies for Teaching Social Skills
    • Resources for Teaching Social Skills
  • Interaction with Family, Peers, and Other
  • Self-Concept
  • Recognition and Expression of Emotions
  • Nonverbal Communication
  • Values Clarification
  • Personal and Social Aspects of Sexuality
  • Physical Aspects of Sexuality
  • Courteous Behavior
  • Problem Solving, Decision Making, and Planning
  • Scholastic Success
  • Personal and Civic Responsibility
  • Appendices
    • Sample Lessons on Conversations
    • Social Skills Curricula
    • Student Books Related to Social Competence
    • Audio and Audio-Visual Materials
    • Catalogs for Specialty Items
    • Glossary
    • Evaluation Forms
    • References
    • Index

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Volume II: Self-Care and Maintenance of Personal Environment

  • Self-Care and Maintenance of Personal Environment Goals
  • Introduction
    • Why Teach Self-Care and Maintenance of Personal Environment
    • Instructional Setting
    • Task Analyses
    • Initiative and Problem Solving
  • Dressing
  • Clothing Management
  • Personal Hygiene and Grooming
  • Toileting and Feminine Hygiene
  • Eating
  • Eating in Different Settings
  • Food Management
  • Housekeeping and Home Maintenance
  • Housing
  • Telephone Use
  • Time Concepts
  • Obtaining and Using Money
  • Health and Safety
  • Self-Advocacy
  • Appendices
    • Sample Lesson on Unbuttoning
    • Sample Lesson on Shopping
    • Audio and Audio-Visual Materials
    • Resources for Task Analyses of Self-Care
    • Resources for Adapted Cookbooks
    • Catalogs for Specialty Items
    • Glossary
    • Evaluation Forms
    • References
    • Index

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Volume III: Play and Leisure

  • Play and Leisure Goals
  • Introduction
    • Why Teach Play and Leisure
    • Play
    • Leisure
    • Resources
  • Management of Leisure Time
  • Solitary Play and Leisure Activities
  • Social Play and Leisure Activities
  • Physical Games and Sports
  • Enjoyment of Pets and Nature
  • Music and Dance
  • Arts and Crafts
  • Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Drama
  • Science and Technology
  • Appendices
    • Sample Lesson on on Playing a Board Game
    • Catalogs for Specialty Items
    • Glossary
    • Evaluation Forms
    • References
    • Index

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