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Case study, Phase 1, Direct Assessment 1, Dark Room

with Eric Grimmett and Sara Kitchen, Certified Teachers of the Visually Impaired.

Sara: So now we're going to go our first direct assessment. In this set of clips, they are all in a dark room, that's where we did our first direct assessment. Brandon noticed the red plate with the light shining on it and he's gonna be leaning in towards it to get closer. And when I give him permission, he's one of those guys who thinks he needs permission to do a lot of things. He's very polite. He touched the red plate and pretty much reached directly for it. So let's look at this clip.

[Video Dialog]

Uh-hum.

You can touch it if you want to.

Uh-hum.

Permission.

[end Video Dialog]

Sara: And let's mark row one which is color, range one to two. Row seven, distance, range one to two. And row 10, visually guided reach because he doesn't look away when we reaches for that, range five to six.

Eric: All right, for this clip, we have Brandon looking at a blue item. We have the flashlight shining on this one as well and Brandon displays a couple of different behaviors here. When he initially sees the blue item, he looks away to reach for it. But then right after that, he gets his face very close to it to really get a gaze at that blue item.

[Video Dialog]

Uh-hum.

Pretty cool. Good job.

[Mumbling]

Uh-hum?

[Mumbling]

Oh, you hear that beeping?

[end Video Dialog]

Eric: Okay, for this one then, we're looking at several different areas.

First, you want to come down to mark row one which is the color row, a range one to two for the blue item. Then let's go to row seven, that's for distance, a range one to two when Brandon brings his face very close to that blue item. And we also have row 10, visually guided reach. We do that in range three to four for Brandon on this item.

Sara: In this clip, we're going to be looking at Brandon looking at a lighted reflective gold thing. I'm not sure what this thing is but it made into our kit. And this thing has movement qualities because it's reflective and we're gonna see Brandon distracted by the actual flashlight, but then he does go ahead and look at this reflective thing and reaches for it. And which is easier to do for kids a lot of times when something is lit up or when it's reflective which means that it looks like it's moving. So let's watch this clip.

[Video Dialog]

[Mumbling]

All right.

[end Video Dialog]

Sara: All right, we're gonna mark this in row two for movement because reflection simulates movement, supercharged movement, in range one to two. We're going to mark this also in row seven, which is distance, range one to two, because Brandon leans in. He looked at the flashlight, too, and we're gonna mark that in light gazing, range three to four. And we're gonna mark row 10, visually guided reach, range three to four, because he reached for it and didn't look away.

Eric: All right, this next clip, we have Brandon looking at a silver and blue pinwheel. So this is reflective as well. It does have that movement quality to it. And you'll see Brandon look directly at that, and when asked to reach out and touch, he does reach out but he'll look away when he does that. But notice how he reaches out to the right of it. He doesn't actually reach out to where it is. This could have something to do with his depth perception, only having vision out of one eye. But he does effectively search for it when prompted to do so.

Sara: Another interesting thing that you'll need to know about Brandon when looking at this clip and looking at a lot of other clips is that since his vision, his best visual field and his remaining vision is in his left eye, he has to cross midline because the use of his body is best on his right side. So he reaches with his right hand for things that are on a left, which is a difficult task.

Eric: And you'll see that in this clip.

[Video Dialog]

Do you wanna touch it one more time?

Yeah.

Oops, where did it go?

It moved. No, it's quite all right.

It moved.

Uh-huh.

Now see if you can touch it.

Good! Very good!

Thank you.

[end Video Dialog]

Eric: All right, for this one, the silver and blue pinwheel, you'll want to mark that in row one, the color row, because of the two color and give that a range, five to six. And we're gonna go down to row two for movement in a range three to four for Brandon on this one. He did search in the correct direction after looking but he looked away. So for visually guided reach in row 10, we're gonna mark that three to four.

Sara: This video clip has a lot going on. Besides just the visual stuff, one of the things you're gonna notice in these clips in the dark room is that I was drawn in by Brandon's interest in the interaction part. Well, he did seem to be waiting for prompts sometimes in order to do things so I went ahead and prompted him. He needed to be engaged in that way to participate especially because he didn't really know us. But we didn't always mark that down for complexity just because it was kind of a constant. Another thing is he's gonna be looking at an aluminum pan with a light shining on it which is basically just reflecting a big light at him. So it's more like he's looking at a light. And he also is hesitant to explore this pan when I asked him to tap it. Instead of doing that, he reaches for my arm and touches my hand, close to the pan. And to me, that's something that's really important to note. It's not a visual thing but as far as thinking about ways that you would interact with Brandon when introducing him to new objects, sometimes he might wanna touch a person's arm instead of the object. So it's just a strategy you might wanna think about using.

[Video Dialog]

Now see if you can touch that thing.

Uh-hum.

That's my arm. Yeah! Very good.

Yeah, you got close.

Try it one more time.

[Chuckles] You got my arm.

You got so close.

That's it.

[Tapping sound]

Can you tap it?

[Tapping sound]

[Chuckles]

[end Video Dialog]

Sara: For this clip, we're gonna mark distance, row seven, range one to two. And then we're gonna look at light gazing which is row six, and mark range one to two. We're gonna mark row five, complexity, range three to four. And the last one we're gonna mark for this clip is in row 10, range three to four because he looked away before he touched the item.

Eric: This next clip, there are a lot of things going on, you can't really tell from the video but this object is a stuffed toy, it's three colors, pink, white and black. And Brandon basically glances at the dog, at the stuffed dog when the light is shone on it, and he reaches towards it but he looks away to reach. Now one thing you're gonna wanna look for is when the sound is activated, when we actually start making the dog sound with the dog.

All visual behavior from Brandon is shut down. He basically no longer uses his vision because that auditory stimulus is there.

[Video Dialog]

Uh-hum.

Okay, I saw that.

Hug.

Uh-hum. Just a minute.

You can have some hugs and kisses in just a minute.

Ready?

[Dog barks]

Sorry.

You're doing great.

[Dog barking]

Whoa! [Laughing]

Scary dog.

You wanna look at it with your eyes?

Uh-hum, you touched it.

[Dog barking]

Dog bite.

[Chuckles]

[end Video Dialog]

Eric: Okay, for the nice stuffed dog here with Brandon, you'll want to come down to row one for color and mark a range of five to six right here. This was a three-colored item for Brandon and he did look at it. Come down to row 10 for visually guided reach and let's give him a range of three to four on this. Let's go down to row five which is visual complexity and give a range of one to two for Brandon in this area. And that concludes our first direct assessment and let's move on to our second direct assessment.