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Lynne:
We asked Ian's family and educators to answer questions about Ian's visual behaviors. Ian's classroom teacher, who is a teacher of the visually impaired, interviewed Ian's mother by phone and wrote down her answers. Sometimes she also added her own input when she saw something different from what mom saw, though this was infrequent. We will consider input from both parent and teacher when recording our information. We'll skip over questions that don't contain any information for us to record on our data sheet, unless they seem to bring up something to take note of. We recorded this information on the data sheet called "Interview Information." You can look at the parent interview guide on page 41 (Appendix 4.A) in Roman's book to help you interpret what the questions are getting at.

Sara:
Question 1 asks what they do to get Ian interested in an object. The answer said that he used to require movement and the color red but "they are past that." We marked that in the first row, "Color" on our data sheet, and in the second row, "Need for Movement."

Question 2 asks about how they know that Ian sees something when it is shown to him. His mom said she asks him to describe it, especially with objects. She commented that with pictures they "wonder if he is guessing." We recorded that information in the fifth row, "Complexity."

Lynne:
Question 3 asks if Ian has a favorite side or head position. It's reported that he tilts his head to the right, and seems to see things better if they are up or at eye level, and that it seems like he may have a hard time with things that are down and in front of him. We marked that data in the fourth row, "Field Preferences."

Question 4 asks if Ian usually finds objects visually or tactually. His mother answered mostly by looking, except when things were on the table in that lower field; he may sometimes find those by feeling. We marked that part of the answer in "Field Preferences." The next statement, "They had a big keys keyboard and he could tell you all the letters that were yellow," we marked in the color and complexity rows.

The last statement, "Using his hands and using his eyes at the same time was difficult," we marked in complexity, because it could be a complexity of the sensory environment issue and we also marked this in visually guided reach, because it could be a visual motor issue.

Sara:
Question 5 asks if there are concerns about they way Ian sees. There was a note that vision didn't seem dependable. Also there were concerns about reading. We didn't mark this down on our data sheet, but this concern seems very related to possible CVI characteristics.

Question 6 asks where someone would hold something for Ian to look at. His mom said at eye-level but that Ian can see "on any plane. It is the 2D that is trickier." We marked "eye level" and "on any plane" in "Field preferences," and 2D is tricky in "Complexity."

Lynne:
Question 9 asks about when Ian likes to look at things. The answer identifies that he sees best when he is awake and alert, and doesn't see as well when he is tired. We marked this answer on the data sheet in the third row, "Visual Latency."

Question 10 asks about Ian's favorite color of things to look at. HIs mother said, "If we are on the highway, he always points out yellow cars. Also things that are red. Bright colors. He is not dependent on color to see like he used to be." We marked that data in the row for "Color." We also marked it in "Distance" since he identifies cars on the highway from a distance.

Sara:
Question 11 asks about what Ian does near shiny and mirrored objects. His mother said this is not applicable now but that they used to get his attention. We marked that data in the row "Need for Movement."

Question 12 asks about Ian's response to lights or ceiling fans. He behaves normally around them. We marked that one in the sixth row, "Light."

Number 13 asks if it is easy to identify what Ian is looking at, and mom answers that it's sometimes difficult. We marked that one in the sixth row, "Light" as well.

Lynne:
Question 14 asks about whether Ian notices things that move or things that don't move first. His mom said movement used to be needed to get him to look, and it continues to help in getting his visual attention, but it is no longer required. We marked that one in "Need for movement."

Number 15 asks about Ian's head positioning while he is looking at something. His teacher said he may hold his head down and toward the left. We marked that in the row called, "Field Preferences."

Sara:
Number 16 asks again about favorite colors. Mom said that yellow & red seem to be what he responds to the most, though his favorite colors are the Laker's colors, Purple & Gold. We marked that in the first row, "Color."

Question 17 asks about whether Ian notices things in new places more, or in familiar places. Mom said he could point out landmarks or items of interest while traveling familiar routes on the highway. She thought unfamiliar situations might cause difficulty. We marked this data in the rows called "Complexity" and "Novelty."

Lynne:
Question 18 asks about how Ian holds his head when reaching toward something. His mom said that he "reaches with his left hand and his head is cocked to the right." His teacher said she thought she saw his head cocked to the left while reaching with the same hand. We marked this one in the row called "Visually Guided Reach."

Question 19 asks how Ian responds when given unfamiliar items to look at. His mom said that she's not sure whether language retrieval or vision would be the reason for the difficulty Ian has with new things. We marked that one in the row for "Visual Novelty."

Sara:
Question 20 asks again about positioning of materials. The answer applies to fields, with "eye-level" being mentioned as more successful than "things on the table," as well as complexity, when she says, "there can not be a lot of stuff competing with what he is trying to do," and that "he can point to details on a picture card..." We marked that information in the corresponding rows.

Question 22 asks what Ian does when he has many items in front of him to look at. Mom said, "That is overload. He may try but then it is just too much." We recorded that response in "Complexity."

Lynne:
Question 23 asks about Ian looking at faces. His mom said that he likes to look at a calendar of pretty girls' faces. We marked that in "Complexity," and in "Novelty" since the calendar girls are not familiar people.

Question 25 asks about the visual characteristics of Ian's favorite objects. His mom said he'll look at anything that is three dimensional, but the two dimensional things seem to cause trouble in looking. We marked that in "Complexity."