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Sara:
The CVI Resolution Chart can be a quick reference guide to use when developing the IEP to accommodate and support a student's current visual functioning. Following the directions at the bottom of the page, we will draw an "X" through boxes that represent resolved visual behaviors, use a highlighter to outline boxes describing current visual functioning, and draw an "O" or circle in boxes that describe visual skills that may never resolve due to coexisting ocular conditions. The boxes highlighted correspond with the scores given on Rating II.

Lynne:
For Ian's CVI Resolution Chart, in the first row, color, we put an X in the first four boxes. Ian did not seem to be restricted to looking at specific colors, though we noted that he continues to be more drawn to red and yellow items. He can look at about anything. We highlighted the last column in that row, Range 9 to 10, because we did not see Ian needing specific colors or patterns in order to look.

In the second row, need for movement, we also put an X in the first four boxes. The last column in Range 9 to 10 was the one we highlighted, "Typical responses to moving targets."

Sara:
In the third row, visual latency, we put Xs in the first two boxes because we did not see latency very much, except when Ian was "tired, stressed or overstimulated," which was what we highlighted in the third column, Range 5 to 6.

In the fourth row, visual field preferences, we marked the first four columns with Xs and highlighted the last column, "visual fields unrestricted," in range 9 to 10.

Lynne:
In the fifth row, difficulties with visual complexity, things were not so clear cut. We marked the first two columns with Xs, since Ian was able to look when the environment wasn't all that controlled. We highlighted "Regards familiar faces when voice does not compete" in range 5 to 6. The other statement in range 5 to 6, "Student tolerates low levels of familiar background noise," seems to be resolved. In Range 7 to 8, we highlighted all of the statements.

Sara:
In the sixth row, light-gazing and nonpurposeful gaze, we put X's in all of the boxes. If there was a statement in range 9 to10, we would have highlighted that, in that Ian behaves typically around light sources.

In the seventh row, difficulty with distance viewing, we saw this characteristic resolved at all levels up to range 7 to 8 and marked those with Xs. We highlighted the statements in range 9 to 10, the last column.

Lynne:
In the eighth row, atypical visual reflexes, we found Ian to be resolved through the first four columns, and highlighted the last column, "Visual reflexes always present; resolved." which was in Range 9 to10.

In the ninth row, difficulty with visual novelty, we found that Ian was able to look at most new items, but not all. We could not highlight the last column, "selection of objects not restricted," and even though we weren't sure he exactly needed warm up time, we highlighted that box, since he definitely did not require "known objects to initiate a looking sequence". This was highlighted more as a process of elimination.

Sara:
In the tenth row, absence of visually guided reach, we found the statement, "Look and touch occur together consistently," to be the best description of Ian, and that the descriptions in the first four columns were resolved. We highlighted the last column in range 9 to 10.

Ian did not have any items that were circled because he has no identified ocular condition.