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Most consultation is general. Specialists do assessments and write recommendations. When specialists consult with teachers, they talk to them about their recommendations. Information is shared at a general level.

Example:

The student has CVI. Most CVI students like the color red. If you want the student to look at something, try using red. Moving the object slightly in the peripheral field might also help.

Many teachers will remember the student might like red and they will probably make an attempt to select red materials when they can. When the VI teacher checks back with the teacher after this kind of consult, she may hear something like, "Well, I don't notice that red really- makes that much difference".

Specific consultation tends to more effective. In this type of consultation the specialist assesses, recommends, demonstrates in a natural context, and evaluates results.

Example:

The student is CVI. CVI students tend to like red. Lets use a red scoop dish at mealtime instead of the cream colored cafeteria tray. If he can see the bowl, it may be easier to get him to scoop. We may need to position the bowl slightly to the left and move it a little at first. When he looks at the bowl, we'll give him a touch prompt to move his hand to the bowl. I'd like to come in at lunch time and try this a few times. Let's keep data on this for two weeks and see if there are more independent attempts to scoop. We may need to do something with the spoon as well.