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AER International, Friday, March 28, 2014

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SLIDE 2: Service Intensity Subcommittee Members- 2010 to present

Current Members
Rona Pogrund, TTU, Chair
Cyral Miller, TSBVI Outreach
Frankie Swift, SFASU
Kitra Gray, Region 10 ESC
Mary Ann Siller, Richardson ISD
Chrissy Cowan, TSBVI Outreach
Michael Munro, SFASU      
Tracy Hallak, SFASU
Debby Cady, SFASU
Cecilia Robinson, Region 4 ESC
Shannon Darst, TTU Ph.D.  student
Former Members
Jim Durkel, TSBVI Outreach
Suzy Scannell, Region 4
Steve Young, Alief ISD Administrator
Dixie Mercer, SFASU
Ann Rash, TSBVI Outreach
Michelle Chauvin, parent

SLIDE 3: What is the VISSIT  ?

Visual Impairment Scale of Service Intensity of Texas (VISSIT)
Type of service: direct intervention and collaborative consultation
Focus on student need
Appropriate for ALL students with visual impairments

SLIDE 4: History of the VISSIT

Creation of the VISSIT
Field trials
June 2013 retreat of the Service Intensity Subcommittee of the Texas Committee for the Education of Students with Visual Impairments

SLIDE 5: History of the VISSIT (continued)

Validation study of the scale
Research study proposal through Texas Tech University’s Institutional Review Board
Study approval and participant selection
Study implementation

SLIDE 6: The VISSIT: First Page

          This slide shows the first page of the VISSIT.  The scale is three columns wide, with column headings from left to right: ECC Skill Area, Direct Instruction from TVI, and Educational Team Support/Collaboration.  This scale is 15 rows deep.  The first row is the heading descriptions for each column.  The second through sixth row include scoring descriptions to be used for scoring student need for each ECC skill area.

Type of TVI ServiceDirect Instruction from TVI Educational Team Support/Collaboration

 

0=no need at this time

0=no need at this time

 

1=low need-occasional support and maintenance of skills

1=low need-teacher(s)/family needs infrequent support for established routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/curriculum

 

4=medium need-needs skills but lower priority; generalization and fluency development

4=medium need-teacher(s)/family needs some support for development and maintenance of routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

7=high need-priority; complete mastery of introduced skills

7=high need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support for established routines/ implementation of IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

10=intense need-priority; acquisition of new skills

10=intense need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support to establish new routines/ implement IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ use of curriculum

ECC Skill Area  V

   

COMPENSATORY SKILLS

 

 

  Literacy Instruction

 

 

Includes emergent literacy, pre-braille, braille, Nemeth, access to print materials, alternate literacy through signs and pictures, etc.

 

 

  Organization and Study Skills

 

 

Includes note-taking, research, time & material management, calendar/ schedule system, etc.

 

 

  Communication Modes

 

 

Includes body responses, gestures, object/tactile/picture symbols, calendars,  sign language, tactile signs for students who are deafblind

 

 

PAGE TOTALS =>

   

 

SLIDE 7: The VISSIT: Final Page

This slide shows the final page of the scale.  The scale is three columns wide, with column heading from left to right: ECC Skill Area, Direct Instruction from TVI, and Educational Team Support/Collaboration.  The final page of the scale is 15 rows deep.  The first row is the descriptions for each column.  The second through sixth row include scoring descriptions to be used for scoring student need for each ECC skill area.  Rows seven through nine include the ECC area of Self-Determination heading and the description of self-determination.  Columns ten and eleven are the Column Subtotals for columns with column headings labeled “Direct Instruction Column Subtotal” in column two and “Educational Team Support Column Subtotal” in column three.  Rows twelve through fourteen include contributing factors score boxes for both columns two and three, as well as the Additional Areas of Family Support Subtotal score box in column three.  Row fifteen includes the score box for the total scores for direct instruction from TVI in column two and educational team support/collaboration in column three.

Type of TVI ServiceDirect Instruction from TVI Educational Team Support/Collaboration

 

0=no need at this time

0=no need at this time

 

1=low need-occasional support and maintenance of skills

1=low need-teacher(s)/family needs infrequent support for established routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/curriculum

 

4=medium need-needs skills but lower priority; generalization and fluency development

4=medium need-teacher(s)/family needs some support for development and maintenance of routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

7=high need-priority; complete mastery of introduced skills

7=high need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support for established routines/ implementation of IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

10=intense need-priority; acquisition of new skills

10=intense need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support to establish new routines/ implement IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ use of curriculum

ECC Skill Area

 

 

SELF-DETERMINATION

 

 

Includes enabling student choice-making, self-evaluation, self-advocacy, and assertiveness

 

 

COLUMN SUBTOTALS

Direct Instruction Column Subtotal

Educational Team Support Column Subtotal

A

 

E

 

Contributing Factor: Transition

B

 

F

 

Contributing Factor: Medical Status/Condition

C

 

G

 

Additional Areas of Family Support Subtotal

 

H

 

TOTAL

D

 

I

 

SLIDE 8: The VISSIT: Additional Areas of Family Support Table

          This slide shows the Additional Areas of Family Support (AAFS) Table.  This table contains two columns and eight rows.  The first column describes the areas of family need.  The second column contains the description of the value range of the scores used to score the areas of family need described in column one.  Row eight is the scoring box for the AAFS table. 

Areas of Family NeedValue Range

 

 

There is a need for:

0=No Need
1=Low Need
4=Medium Need
7=High Need
10=Intense Need

Consistency of educational concepts across school and home settings (e.g., communication systems, behavioral techniques, routines, independent living skills, environmental adaptations, adapted toys/equipment, etc.).

 

Connecting family members to outside agencies and support services (e.g., family organizations, state and local community resources including related agencies, camps, respite, etc.).

 

Facilitating active family participation in special education meetings and medical visits (e.g., training on special education laws and guidelines, interpreting medical information, accompanying family to medical visits).

 

Assistance in overcoming cultural/language differences.

 

Strategies to support family members in bonding and interactions with their child.

 

SUBTOTAL

H

 

SLIDE 9: The VISSIT: Recommended Direct Service Time Range Form

This slide shows the recommended schedule of service minutes for direct service time.  The table contains four columns and fourteen rows.  The first column is the list of the score ranges on the TOTAL direct service score on the VISSIT.  The second column includes the recommended service time ranges for each score range.  The third column is the space where the actual total from the VISSIT  direct service time need is recorded.  The fourth column is the space where the actual recommended direct service time will be recorded.

DIRECT SERVICE TIMETOTAL (box D) from direct service columnYOUR Recommended AMOUNT OF DIRECT SERVICE TIME
(MINUTES PER WEEK)

Score on rubric

Suggested service time

 

 

106+

600 or more minutes/wk

 

 

97 - 106

480 - 600 minutes/wk

 

 

86 -96

360 - 480 minutes/wk

 

 

75 - 85

270 - 360 minutes/wk

 

 

60 -74

180 - 270 minutes/wk

 

 

45 - 59

120 - 180 minutes/wk

 

 

38 – 44

90 - 120 minutes/wk

 

 

29 – 37

60 - 90 minutes/wk

 

 

17 –  28

30 - 60 minutes/wk

 

 

10 - 16

15 - 30 minutes/wk

 

 

0 – 9

0 - 15 minutes/wk

 

 

BASED on a 2400-minute/per week system --- 2400 minutes in a school week (includes a 7 hour, 15 minute school day, plus 45 minutes for lunch [lunch time can be used for instruction])
2400 min per week = 480 minutes per day available for instruction

SLIDE 10: The VISSIT: Recommended Educational Team Support/Collaboration Service Time Range Form

This slide shows the recommended schedule of service minutes for educational team support/collaborative service time.  The table contains four columns and fourteen rows.  The first column is the list of the score ranges on the TOTAL collaborative consultation service score on the VISSIT.  The second column includes the recommended service time ranges for each score range.  The third column is the space where the actual total from the VISSIT educational team support/collaboration service time need is recorded.  The fourth column is the space where the actual recommended educational team support/collaboration service time will be recorded.

Educational Team
Support/Collaboration Time
TOTAL (box I) from the educational team support/ collaboration columnYOUR Recommended AMOUNT OF EDUCATIONAL TEAM SUPPORT/COLLABORATION SERVICE TIME
(MINUTES PER WEEK)

Score on rubric

Suggested service time

 

 

112+

600 or more minutes/wk

 

 

101 - 111

450 - 600 minutes/wk

 

 

91 - 100

300 - 450 minutes/wk

 

 

81 - 90

150 - 300 minutes/wk

 

 

69 - 80

110 - 150 minutes/wk

 

 

58 - 68

70 - 110 minutes/wk

 

 

47 – 57

30 - 70 minutes/wk

 

 

40  –  46

15 - 30 minutes/wk

 

 

27 – 39

10 - 15 minutes/wk

 

 

14 - 26

5 - 10 minutes/wk

 

 

0 – 13

0 - 5 minutes/wk

 

 

SLIDE 11: The VISSIT: Frequently Asked Questions

This is a list of the frequently-asked questions in the VISSIT.  They are divided into three sections: purpose, how to use the VISSIT, and effect on programming.

PURPOSE

Q:  Can the VISSIT be used for all students on my caseload, including those with multiple impairments and/or those with deafblindness? How about infants?

A:  The VISSIT is designed to determine the appropriate type and amount of services needed for ALL students with visual impairments on the TVI caseload.

Q:  Is the VISSIT to be used as a caseload analysis?

A:  The VISSIT is not a caseload analysis tool but can be used as part of a process to determine appropriate caseload size. The VISSIT does not take into account issues related to workload (e.g., planning, travel, and material preparation).

HOW TO USE THE VISSIT

Q:  Can professionals who are not teachers of students with visual impairments fill out the VISSIT?

A:  The VISSIT must be completed by a TVI who has the vision-specific knowledge to quantify the levels of service intensity.

Q:  How often should the VISSIT be completed? When might I complete the VISSIT?

A:  The VISSIT should be completed prior to any determination of service type and amount. It should be completed prior to any IEP or IFSP meeting so that the TVI can have data to determine and support recommended type and amount of services for students.

SLIDE 12: The VISSIT Validation Study

  • 38 responded and consented to participate
  • 25 actual participants
  • 81 actual VISSITs completed and returned
  • Electronic survey
  • Results of the study indicated that the tool is valid and reliable

SLIDE 13: Was the VISSIT, in its entirety, easy to use?

This table shows the responses of participants in regard to ease of use of the VISSIT.  The table is made of eight columns and two rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column, and row two includes the results. 

#QuestionCompletely unclearMostly unclearClearMostly clearCompletely clearTotal ResponsesMean

1

How clear?

1

1

3

13

7

25

3.96

SLIDE 14: Time Needed to Complete VISSIT

The average time it took to complete the VISSIT per student was 31 minutes per student.

Average time to complete was faster (15-20 minutes) after completion of several scales and with more familiarity.

SLIDE 15: Did you base your VISSIT scoring of student need on the student's evaluation results?

This table shows the responses of participants in regard to how the participants based their scoring of student need on the VISSIT.  The table is made of eight columns and two rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column, and row two includes the results. 

#QuestionCompletely not based on evaluation resultsMostly not based on evaluation resultsSomewhat based on evaluation resultsMostly based on evaluation resultsCompletely based on evaluation resultsTotal ResponsesMean

1

Based on student evaluation results?

0

0

4

10

10

24

4.25

SLIDE 16: Did the results of the VISSIT match your professional judgment regarding student need and recommended type and amount of service?

This table shows the responses of participants in regard to whether the results of the VISSIT matched the participant’s professional judgment regarding student need and recommended type and amount of service.  The table is made of eight columns and two rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column, and row two includes the results. 

#QuestionCompletely did not matchMostly did not matchSomewhat matchedMostly matchedCompletely matchedTotal ResponsesMean

1

Matched?

2

1

4

10

7

24

3.79

SLIDE 17: Did your VISSIT results directly translate into the type and amount of service you recommended for your student's IEP?

This table shows the responses of participants in regard to how the results of the VISSIT directly translated into the type and amount of service they recommended for their students’ IEPs.  The table is made of eight columns and two rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column, and row two includes the results. 

#QuestionCompletely did not translate to recommendationMostly did not translate to recommendationSomewhat translated to recommendationMostly translated to recommendationCompletely translated to recommendationTotal ResponsesMean

1

Translated to recommendation?

0

1

5

10

8

24

4.04

SLIDE 18: Do you feel you would use the VISSIT in the future for determining the type and amount of service you recommend for your students?

This table shows the responses of participants in regard to their opinions about using the VISSIT in the future.  The table is made of four columns and four rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column.  Rows two through four include the results. 

#AnswerResponse%

2

Yes

22

96%

1

No

1

4%

 

Total

23

100%

SLIDE 19: Do you feel that the VISSIT is a better tool to use for determining the type and amount of service than other available tools or methods you are currently using?

This table shows the responses of participants in regard to their opinion of the VISSIT when compared to other tools or methods used for determining service time.  The table is made of four columns and four  rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column.  Rows two through four include the results. 

#AnswerResponse%

2

Yes

18

78%

1

No

5

22%

 

Total

23

100%

SLIDE 20: Revised VISSIT

Based on feedback from the study participants, the instructions were simplified and reformatted to make it more user-friendly
A test-retest phase of the study was conducted in March with the revised VISSIT asking the same participants to complete one additional administration of the tool on one student and take a short survey to assess the revisions of the scale.

Slide 21: Overall, was the revised VISSIT easy to use?

(n=16)
This table shows the responses of participants in regard to the ease of use of the revised VISSIT.  The table is made of four columns and six rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column, and rows 2 through 6 includes the results. 

#AnswerResponse%

1

Completely difficult to use

0

0%

2

Mostly difficult to use

0

0%

3

Easy to use

0

0%

4

Mostly easy to use

8

50%

5

Completely easy to use

9

56%

Slide 22: Were the revised instructions clear and understandable?

(n=16)
This table shows the responses of participants in regard to the clarity and understandability of the revised instructions of the VISSIT.  The table is made of four columns and six rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column, and rows 2 through 6 includes the results. 

#AnswerResponse%

1

Completely unclear and not understandable

0

0%

2

Mostly unclear and not understandable

0

0%

3

Clear and understandable

1

6%

4

Mostly clear and understandable

5

31%

5

Completely clear and understandable

10

63%

Slide 23: Would you prefer to use a paper format or an electronic format of the VISSIT?

(n=16)
This table shows the responses of participants in regard to their preference of use of the paper format or an electronic format.  The table is made of four columns and three rows.  Row one is the heading description for each of the column, and rows 2 and 3 include the results. 

#AnswerResponse%

1

Paper format

6

38%

2

Electronic format

10

63%

 SLIDE 24: Next Steps

The electronic version has been completed.
A website for accessing the electronic version is in development.  
Continuing data analysis to gather more information about various aspects of the validity and reliability of the tool. 

SLIDE 25: Sample VISSIT – STUDENT A “Lily”

 Lily is a 5-year-old girl who has a history of “extensive multifocal cystic encephalomalacia involving bilateral cerebral hemispheres”.  Dr. XXX reports, “likely cortical vision impairment”, legally blind and, "… appears to have no vision".  Lily also has a history of HSV meningitis as an infant, cerebral palsy, seizure disorder, encephalopathy, and developmental delay.  She is able to alert to sounds and to her name being called; turn or tilt her head towards music, bells, and instruments; sit in an adapted chair; smile when she is happy; and demonstrate discomfort (as when she is wet).  She demonstrates the 3 distinct criteria for Cortical Visual Impairment:  1) eye exam does not explain the child’s functional use of vision, 2) history of a neurologic incident or some neurologic sequelae, and 3) demonstrates the unique visual and behavioral characteristics associated with CVI.

With regard to her vision, Lily is able to visually attend to and track an 8-inch lighted red ball when it is presented in either her far left or far right visual field or no more than 12 inches away from her face.  She also visually attends to other targets that are either lighted or have reflective qualities.  No distance viewing is observed, other than staring at ceiling lights and sunlight for brief moments.  Results from her learning media assessment indicate that Lily relies heavily on her auditory mode for learning, but will explore real objects that are of a single, bright color, reflective, and/or can light up. 
Lily is transitioning from a school-based self-contained classroom into a homebound setting with services being provided in her home.

Slide 26: Filling Out the VISSIT – Intensity of Need in Skill Areas

This slide shows the first page of the VISSIT.  The scale is three columns wide, with column headings from left to right: ECC Skill Area, Direct Instruction from TVI, and Educational Team Support/Collaboration.  This scale is 15 rows deep.  The first row is the heading descriptions for each column.  The second through sixth row include scoring descriptions to be used for scoring student need for each ECC skill area.

This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily. 

Type of TVI ServiceDirect Instruction from TVI Educational Team Support/Collaboration

 

0=no need at this time

0=no need at this time

 

1=low need-occasional support and maintenance of skills

1=low need-teacher(s)/family needs infrequent support for established routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/curriculum

 

4=medium need-needs skills but lower priority; generalization and fluency development

4=medium need-teacher(s)/family needs some support for development and maintenance of routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

7=high need-priority; complete mastery of introduced skills

7=high need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support for established routines/ implementation of IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

10=intense need-priority; acquisition of new skills

10=intense need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support to establish new routines/ implement IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ use of curriculum

ECC Skill Area  V

   

COMPENSATORY SKILLS

 

 

  Literacy Instruction

 

 

Includes emergent literacy, pre-braille, braille, Nemeth, access to print materials, alternate literacy through signs and pictures, etc.

 0

 0

  Organization and Study Skills

 

 

Includes note-taking, research, time & material management, calendar/ schedule system, etc.

 0

 0

  Communication Modes

 

 

Includes body responses, gestures, object/tactile/picture symbols, calendars,  sign language, tactile signs for students who are deafblind

 4

 4

PAGE TOTALS =>

4

4

Slide 27: Filling Out the VISSIT – Intensity of Need in Skill Areas

This slide shows the second page of the VISSIT.  The scale is three columns wide, with column headings from left to right: ECC Skill Area, Direct Instruction from TVI, and Educational Team Support/Collaboration.  This scale is 15 rows deep.  The first row is the heading descriptions for each column.  The second through sixth row include scoring descriptions to be used for scoring student need for each ECC skill area. This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily. 

Type of TVI ServiceDirect Instruction from TVI Educational Team Support/Collaboration

 

0=no need at this time

0=no need at this time

 

1=low need-occasional support and maintenance of skills

1=low need-teacher(s)/family needs infrequent support for established routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/curriculum

 

4=medium need-needs skills but lower priority; generalization and fluency development

4=medium need-teacher(s)/family needs some support for development and maintenance of routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

7=high need-priority; complete mastery of introduced skills

7=high need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support for established routines/ implementation of IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

10=intense need-priority; acquisition of new skills

10=intense need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support to establish new routines/ implement IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ use of curriculum

ECC Skill Area  V

   

Access to Core Curriculum

 

 

Includes access to English/language arts, math concepts, math trends, tactile graphics, science, social students, art, music, and P.E.

 0

 0

Concept Development

 

 

Includes note-taking, research, time & material management, calendar/ schedule system, etc.

 0

 0

Assistive Technology

 

 

Electronic Devices

 

 

Includes braille notetakers, electronic braillers, tablets, mobile devices, audio devices, readers, switches, deafblind-specific technology, etc.

 4

 1

PAGE TOTALS =>

4

1

Slide 28: Page 3

This slide shows the third page of the VISSIT.  The scale is three columns wide, with column headings from left to right: ECC Skill Area, Direct Instruction from TVI, and Educational Team Support/Collaboration.  This scale is 15 rows deep.  The first row is the heading descriptions for each column.  The second through sixth row include scoring descriptions to be used for scoring student need for each ECC skill area.  This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily. 

Type of TVI Service

Direct Instruction from TVI

 Educational Team Support/Collaboration

 

0=no need at this time

0=no need at this time

 

1=low need-occasional support and maintenance of skills

1=low need-teacher(s)/family needs infrequent support for established routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/curriculum

 

4=medium need-needs skills but lower priority; generalization and fluency development

4=medium need-teacher(s)/family needs some support for development and maintenance of routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

7=high need-priority; complete mastery of introduced skills

7=high need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support for established routines/ implementation of IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

10=intense need-priority; acquisition of new skills

10=intense need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support to establish new routines/ implement IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ use of curriculum

ECC Skill Area  V

   

Computer Access

 

 

Includes magnification, screen reading, alternative keyboards, keyboarding, etc.

 0

 0

Low-Tech Devices

 

 

Includes abacus, mechanical brailler, reading stand, optical devices, etc.

 0

 0

Social Interaction Skills

 

 

Includes gestures, facial expressions, conversation skills, body language, developing relationships, personal space, human sexuality, etc.

 0

 0

PAGE TOTALS =>

0

0

Slide 29: Page 4

This slide shows the fourth page of the VISSIT.  The scale is three columns wide, with column headings from left to right: ECC Skill Area, Direct Instruction from TVI, and Educational Team Support/Collaboration.  This scale is 15 rows deep.  The first row is the heading descriptions for each column.  The second through sixth row include scoring descriptions to be used for scoring student need for each ECC skill area.  This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily. 

Type of TVI Service

Direct Instruction from TVI

 Educational Team Support/Collaboration

 

0=no need at this time

0=no need at this time

 

1=low need-occasional support and maintenance of skills

1=low need-teacher(s)/family needs infrequent support for established routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/curriculum

 

4=medium need-needs skills but lower priority; generalization and fluency development

4=medium need-teacher(s)/family needs some support for development and maintenance of routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

7=high need-priority; complete mastery of introduced skills

7=high need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support for established routines/ implementation of IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

10=intense need-priority; acquisition of new skills

10=intense need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support to establish new routines/ implement IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ use of curriculum

ECC Skill Area  V

   

Independent Living Skills

 

 

Includes functional skills needed for personal care, time and money management, food preparation, clothing care, household maintenance, etc.

 0

 0

Career Education

 

 

Includes learning about jobs and work-related skills, assuming responsibilities, evaluating vocational interests, exploring and participating in work experiences, preparing for transition, etc.

 0

 0

Sensory Efficiency Skills

 

 

Includes teaching functional use of vision, hearing, touch, smell, and taste

 7

 4

PAGE TOTALS =>

7

4

Slide 30: Page 5

This slide shows the fifth page of the VISSIT.  The scale is three columns wide, with column headings from left to right: ECC Skill Area, Direct Instruction from TVI, and Educational Team Support/Collaboration.  This scale is 15 rows deep.  The first row is the heading descriptions for each column.  The second through sixth row include scoring descriptions to be used for scoring student need for each ECC skill area.  This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily. 

Type of TVI Service è

Direct Instruction from TVI

 Educational Team Support/Collaboration

 

0=no need at this time

0=no need at this time

 

1=low need-occasional support and maintenance of skills

1=low need-teacher(s)/family needs infrequent support for established routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/curriculum

 

4=medium need-needs skills but lower priority; generalization and fluency development

4=medium need-teacher(s)/family needs some support for development and maintenance of routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

7=high need-priority; complete mastery of introduced skills

7=high need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support for established routines/ implementation of IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

10=intense need-priority; acquisition of new skills

10=intense need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support to establish new routines/ implement IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ use of curriculum

ECC Skill Area  V

   

Recreation/Leisure Skills

 

 

Includes investigating and experiencing recreation and leisure options, including games, sports, social events, and personal interests

 1

 1

  O&M Support From TVI

 

 

Includes collaborating with the O&M specialist to support basic skills (guide technique, protective techniques, alignment, sound localization) and orientation and monitoring student safety

 0

 0

PAGE TOTALS =>

1

1

Slide 31: Final Page

This slide shows the final page of the scale.  The scale is three columns wide, with column heading from left to right: ECC Skill Area, Direct Instruction from TVI, and Educational Team Support/Collaboration.  The final page of the scale is 15 rows deep.  The first row is the descriptions for each column.  The second through sixth row include scoring descriptions to be used for scoring student need for each ECC skill area.  Rows seven through nine include the ECC area of Self-Determination heading and the description of self-determination.  Columns ten and eleven are the Column Subtotals for columns with column headings labeled “Direct Instruction Column Subtotal” in column two and “Educational Team Support Column Subtotal” in column three.  Rows twelve through fourteen include contributing factors score boxes for both columns two and three, as well as the Additional Areas of Family Support Subtotal score box in column three.  Row fifteen includes the score box for the total scores for direct instruction from TVI in column two and educational team support/collaboration in column three. This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily. 

Type of TVI Service èDirect Instruction from TVI Educational Team Support/Collaboration

 

0=no need at this time

0=no need at this time

 

1=low need-occasional support and maintenance of skills

1=low need-teacher(s)/family needs infrequent support for established routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/curriculum

 

4=medium need-needs skills but lower priority; generalization and fluency development

4=medium need-teacher(s)/family needs some support for development and maintenance of routines/ IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

7=high need-priority; complete mastery of introduced skills

7=high need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support for established routines/ implementation of IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ curriculum

 

10=intense need-priority; acquisition of new skills

10=intense need-teacher(s)/family needs ongoing support to establish new routines/ implement IEP goals & objectives/ modeling/ use of curriculum

ECC Skill Area

 

 

SELF-DETERMINATION

 

 

Includes enabling student choice-making, self-evaluation, self-advocacy, and assertiveness

 0

 0

COLUMN SUBTOTALS

Direct Instruction Column Subtotal

Educational Team Support Column Subtotal

A

16

E

10

Contributing Factor: Transition

B

+10

F

+10

Contributing Factor: Medical Status/Condition

C

0

G

0

Additional Areas of Family Support Subtotal

 

H

22

TOTAL

D

26

I

42

Slide 32: AAFS

This slide shows the Additional Areas of Family Support (AAFS) Table.  This table contains two columns and eight rows.  The first column describes the areas of family need.  The second column contains the description of the value range of the scores used to score the areas of family need described in column one.  Row eight is the scoring box for the AAFS table.  This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily

Areas of Family NeedValue Range

 

 

There is a need for:

0=No Need
1=Low Need
4=Medium Need
7=High Need
10=Intense Need

Consistency of educational concepts across school and home settings (e.g., communication systems, behavioral techniques, routines, independent living skills, environmental adaptations, adapted toys/equipment, etc.).

10

Connecting family members to outside agencies and support services (e.g., family organizations, state and local community resources including related agencies, camps, respite, etc.).

7

Facilitating active family participation in special education meetings and medical visits (e.g., training on special education laws and guidelines, interpreting medical information, accompanying family to medical visits).

4

Assistance in overcoming cultural/language differences.

0

Strategies to support family members in bonding and interactions with their child.

1

SUBTOTAL

H

22

Slide 33: The VISSIT: Recommended Direct Service Time Range Form

This slide shows the recommended schedule of service minutes for direct service time.  The table contains four columns and fourteen rows.  The first column is the list of the score ranges on the TOTAL direct service score on the VISSIT.  The second column includes the recommended service time ranges for each score range.  The third column is the space where the actual total from the VISSIT  direct service time need is recorded.  The fourth column is the space where the actual recommended direct service time will be recorded. This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily.

DIRECT SERVICE TIMETOTAL (box D) from direct service columnYOUR Recommended AMOUNT OF DIRECT SERVICE TIME
(MINUTES PER WEEK)

Score on rubric

Suggested service time

 

 

106+

600 or more minutes/wk

 

 

97 - 106

480 - 600 minutes/wk

 

 

86 -96

360 - 480 minutes/wk

 

 

75 - 85

270 - 360 minutes/wk

 

 

60 -74

180 - 270 minutes/wk

 

 

45 - 59

120 - 180 minutes/wk

 

 

38 – 44

90 - 120 minutes/wk

 

 

29 – 37

60 - 90 minutes/wk

 

 

17 –  28

30 - 60 minutes/wk

26

60 minutes per week

10 - 16

15 - 30 minutes/wk

 

 

0 – 9

0 - 15 minutes/wk

 

 

BASED on a 2400-minute/per week system --- 2400 minutes in a school week (includes a 7 hour, 15 minute school day, plus 45 minutes for lunch [lunch time can be used for instruction])
2400 min per week = 480 minutes per day available for instruction

Slide 34: The VISSIT: Recommended Educational Team Support/Collaboration Service Time Range Form

This slide shows the recommended schedule of service minutes for educational team support/collaborative service time.  The table contains four columns and fourteen rows.  The first column is the list of the score ranges on the TOTAL collaborative consultation service score on the VISSIT.  The second column includes the recommended service time ranges for each score range.  The third column is the space where the actual total from the VISSIT educational team support/collaboration service time need is recorded.  The fourth column is the space where the actual recommended educational team support/collaboration service time will be recorded. This table is filled in with the scores given to the sample student, Lily.

Educational Team
Support/Collaboration Time
TOTAL (box I) from the educational team support/
collaboration column
YOUR Recommended AMOUNT OF EDUCATIONAL TEAM SUPPORT/COLLABORATION SERVICE TIME
(MINUTES PER WEEK)

Score on rubric

Suggested service time

 

 

112+

600 or more minutes/wk

 

 

101 - 111

450 - 600 minutes/wk

 

 

91 - 100

300 - 450 minutes/wk

 

 

81 - 90

150 - 300 minutes/wk

 

 

69 - 80

110 - 150 minutes/wk

 

 

58 - 68

70 - 110 minutes/wk

 

 

47 – 57

30 - 70 minutes/wk

 

 

40  –  46

15 - 30 minutes/wk

42

30 minutes per week

27 – 39

10 - 15 minutes/wk

 

 

14 - 26

5 - 10 minutes/wk

 

 

0 – 13

0 - 5 minutes/wk

 

 

Slide 35: Questions?  Comments?

Slide 36:  Contact Information
Rona Pogrund, Ph.D., Texas Tech University –
Cyral Miller, Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired –
Michael Munro, Stephen F. Austin State University –
Shannon Darst, Ph.D., Texas Tech University –