Communication
for Children with Deafblindness, or Visual and Multiple Impairments

Create the Routine

This is not so hard! Use your imagination. Think of the things that your student likes to do. Think of things that you like to do. Make it functional – I cannot stress this enough – Our students/children learn best when they’re doing – When they’re involved in experiences that they can attach positive emotions to.

Considerations:

  • What are the IEP objectives that will be infused?
  • What skills are being targeted?
  • Consider the language that will be infused – write that down too.
  • Are there any special modifications or adaptations needed?
  • What materials will you need?

Do it!

  • Write the steps of the routine down in order
  • Label each step in your routine with sign – vocalization - and the appropriate symbol – i.e., what are you going to call the action of pouring the flour into the mix during your “cookie making routine”?
  • Use a sequence calendar (if appropriate) to distinguish each step as a separate chunk of time and part in the routine.
  • Have a clear beginning, middle, and end.
  • Establish a consistent time and place where you will do your activity.
  • Train the entire team (including parents) in each step of the routine so it can be consistently implemented.
  • Have fun!