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Cassie: Filling Out the CVI Resolution chart Transcript

Lynne:
The CVI Resolution Chart can be a quick reference guide to use when developing the IEP to accommodate and support a student's current visual functioning. Following the directions at the bottom of the page, we will draw an "X" through boxes that represent resolved visual behaviors, use a highlighter to outline boxes describing current visual functioning, and draw a circle in boxes that describe visual skills that may never resolve due to coexisting ocular conditions. The highlighted boxes correspond with the scores given on Rating II.

Sara:
For Cassie's CVI Resolution Chart, in the first row, color, we put an "X" in the first box, "Objects viewed are generally a single color," because Cassie looks at things that have more than one color. We put an "X" in the second box, "Has 'favorite' color," because she did not seem to show a color preference. In the third box, "Objects may have two to three favored colors," we also put an X, since Cassie showed no color preference, and would look at a small variety of items that had two or three colors. The next box, "More colors, familiar patterns regarded," was what we highlighted, since Cassie seemed to be interested in many colors and especially in the familiar stripe pattern.

Lynne:
In the second row, need for movement, we marked the first and second boxes with "Xs," because Cassie was able to look at things that didn't move, though we found movement definitely helped her to visually attend, particularly when there were high levels of complexity. We highlighted the third box, "Movement continues to be an important factor to initiate visual attention."

Sara:
The third row, visual latency, presented a question of ocular vs. CVI characteristics. We definitely saw Cassie looking at most things immediately. She was able to locate these targets, and demonstrated that by reaching for them after she had seen them. If the target had high levels of complexity and was new to her, however, she did not study it. So we marked "X" in the first two boxes, because we did not see latency in most situations. We did see it after we had asked her to look at a lot of new things in a non-routine testing session. She became tired and her looking behaviors decreased. By the end of the testing session, it seemed to take her quite a while to decide to study a visually simple item that produced movement, and when she did look, it was not for long. So we highlighted the third box in that row, "Latency present only when student is tired, stressed, or overstimulated." We circled the next two boxes because, according to her eye report, Cassie has intermittent nystagmus. Nystagmus can also cause decreased looking if the student is tired, stressed, or overstimulated.

Lynne:
In the fourth row, visual field preferences, we marked an "X" in the first box, "Distinct field dependency," because we did see Cassie respond to highly stimulating things in her peripheral fields. We highlighted the second box, "shows visual field preferences," because Cassie needed non-shiny or static things placed in a specific spot to see them. Even a very favored item could not be detected slightly out of her best field, which was her lower central field.

In the fifth row, we found that Cassie could definitely use her vision when there were low to medium levels of background noise, though sometimes this would increase the difficulties in other areas, such as looking at touching at the same time. We marked an "X" in the first two boxes, and highlighted the third box, "Student tolerates low levels of familiar background noise. Regards familiar faces when voice does not compete." This last statement in particular really seemed to describe Cassie's behavior.

Sara:
The sixth row, light-gazing and nonpurposeful gaze, we thought about for quite a while. When Cassie is busy doing something, she does not seem to be distracted by light, though she does respond to it by squinting for short periods of time. She may take a brief time out to look at a light in a totally new and out-of-routine situation like when we pulled her out of her classroom to do some direct assessment, but in general, when she is working on something, she does not get distracted and stop looking at other things because of light. When she does take a break she easily redirects herself back to the activity at hand. So we put an "X" in each of the first two boxes and highlighted the third box, "Light is no longer a distractor."

Lynne:
In the seventh row, "Difficulty with distance viewing," we marked "Xs" in the first three boxes because we definitely noticed Cassie seeing objects beyond 6 feet if they had movement qualities. We highlighted the box, "Visual attention extends to 10 feet with targets that produce movement."

The eighth row, "Atypical visual reflexes" we mulled over for a while. The first two boxes we obvious Xs, so we marked those that way. We really noticed that Cassie always blinked when an open hand came toward her face. So that would not be an intermittent response. That caused us to put an "X" in the third box as well. We then highlighted the next box, "Visual threat response consistently present (both reflexes near 90 percent resolved)."

Sara:
The ninth row was interesting. We presented Cassie with a number of new objects. She did not study many of them, particularly the ones that were challenging due to complexity of the target, but she was able to detect and respond to them. Sometimes, she just knew something was there, and reached in the general vicinity to find it tactually. Sometimes she reached directly toward a novel item if there was a plain background. So the novelty of the item did not seem to present a problem as far as detecting it visually. We put an "X" in each of the first four boxes and highlighted the last box, "Selection of objects not restricted."

Lynne:
In the last row, absence of visually guided reach, we put an "X" in the first two boxes because Cassie was able to look and touch at the same time particularly when items presented were familiar or had movement qualities against a non-complex background. We highlighted the third box, "Visually guided reach used with familiar objects or 'favorite' color." The "familiar objects" part seemed very important, though "favorite color" was not really an issue.