TEXAS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED PRESENTS VIP MENTOR TRAINING:

ANALYZING STYLES OF MENTORING

Mentor 1: The best intersection to teach crossings at lighted intersections is over at 7th and Main Street. 

Mentor 2: The first thing you need to do is discover a motivator that appeals to a student; this is the key to having them put in the effort to memorize all the Braille contractions.

Mentor 3: Yeah. Working with children with multiple impairments can be difficult at first.  I remember the first time I walked into a functional skills classroom, and the child I was going to work with for the first time had a seizure, right there.

Mentor 4:  Oh, I need to send you this web address.  I think you’d find this information on albinism useful with your student.

Mentor 5: Always remember that parents are the experts on their child.  They’re the ones that are going to be with that child for all their life.  As professionals, we need to respect the information that parents have to share with the educational team, as well as their feelings.

Mentor 6: Be sure to keep detailed records of your mileage.  You’ll use the form provided by the District, and at the end of the month submit your mileage for reimbursement.

Mentor 7: Before you can work out your itinerant schedule, you have to get your students’ schedules.  Then you can use this form that has the day broken down into 15-minute intervals and plot your schedule. Remember that from week to week, your schedule’s probably going to change, because of changes in your student’s schedules and needs and things that come up. Also, when you’re planning your schedule, make sure that you plan time for lunch and a planning time.